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If I have a model that works directly with my database (Personally using ASP.NET w\Entity Framework) should I be using a constructor to set variable?

Example:

public class songs
{
    public IEnumerable<songs> allSongs {get; }

    public songs()
    {
        using (var context = new entities())
        {
            allSongs = context.songs.orderBy(n => n.name).toList();
        }
    }
 }

VS

public class songs
{
    public IEnumerable<songs> allSongs
    {
        get
        {
            using (var context = new entities())
            {
                allSongs = context.songs.orderBy(n => n.name).toList();
            }
         }
    }

    public songs() {}
 }

Technically both are correct, but which is more correct? The only time I can think of where there is only one correct answer is if the variable I'm setting either needs to always be updated or stay the same during an operation.

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2 Answers

You shouldn't be accessing the data from a domain class.

You should create a SongRepository which interacts with your database. You inject the controller with this repository and when you want a list of songs you simply refer to that repository.

It might become a little tricky when songs is actually supposed to be it's own entity. However I'd strongly suggest you to implement the repository pattern.

The second approach is best when working with repositories.

Example layout:

public class SongController : Controller {
 private SongRepository _songRepository;

 public SongController(SongRepository repo) {
  _songRepository = repo;
 }

 public ActionResult ShowSongs(){
  return View(_songRepository.GetAllSongs());
 }
}

public class SongRepository {
 public IEnumerable<Song> GetAllSongs(){
  using (var context = new entities())
        {
            allSongs = context.songs.orderBy(n => n.name).toList();
        } 
 }
}
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Not sure I understand what you mean about the domain class. Can you provide a reference to help me understand why my example is outside of best practices? The above is really just an example. Would I really want to make a repository every time I need to work with data. As @Stijn said below, I'm not always going to be grabbing a copy of every item in the database. –  DR913 Nov 6 '13 at 18:48
    
@DR913: You should be injecting your repository using a tool like ninject which will make sure there is just one repository that's used everywhere. I will elaborate my answer in 3-4 hours after I get back from a lecture (and if nobody has done so by then) –  Jeroen Vannevel Nov 6 '13 at 18:51
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What if you only want to get 1 song? I'm sure you don't want to load all songs then.

If I may add, you should take a look around at existing projects or tutorials to see how things can be done. Note that I say can, what you'll read is by no means the way to do it. For example, @JeroenVannevel recommends the repository pattern, but there are plenty of people who recommend against it (when working with EF).

I recommend browsing the top questions in , , and before deciding on your data access strategy.

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