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I recently started to play around with NodeJS - all I know is that it's a server side technology. What I did and want to accomplish are as following:

I have a MongoDB running on a remote server. I am using nodejs mongodb driver, and by simply doing the following I can connect to the database and just lets say create a document:

// main.js
var MongoClient = require('mongodb').MongoClient;
MongoClient.connect('mongodb://remote_url:27017/mymongo', function(err, db) {
    var document = {a:"1", b:"2"};
    db.collection('collection').insert(document, function(err, records) {
        if (err) throw err;
    }
}

As you know, the code above requires a console call such: node main.js, however I have a HTML5 frontend with several text fields, and I want to pass the fields to my database with a simple button click event. My questions are:

Is it really stupid if I directly connect to remote mongodb as above? Can I call the script from my HTML page? If I can, then what are the drawbacks compared to redesigning it into a client-server structure?

Finally, I think the right practice to accomplish above is to create an http server with nodejs on the remote server which passes client's requests to the mongodb driver. Am I right?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Is it really stupid if I directly connect to remote mongodb as above?

No, using the native MongoDB driver is pretty standard. However, instead of connecting and then immediately interacting with your database, I'd structure the application so that you connect and then wait for HTTP calls or some other function to interact with the database.

Can I call the script from my HTML page?

Absolutely. In your node.js application, I would build in a web server that listens for certain HTTP calls. In your HTML, provide links or forms to GET, POST, etc. the web server that your application is listening on.

For example, your front-end would look like maybe a <form action="/document/add" method="post">. Then, keep main.js as your back-end code running on node.js, but modify it to listen for a POST call to /document/add. When a call to that URL comes in, run the insert code with the POSTed form data.

You could also create an AJAX solution to listen for form submission and submit the POST in the background, wait for a response, and update the page accordingly.

What are the drawbacks compared to redesigning it into a client-server structure?

Advantages and drawbacks are going to be very specific to the type of application you want to create.

I think the right practice to accomplish above is to create an http server with nodejs on the remote server which passes client's requests to the mongodb driver. Am I right?

You are correct. That is pretty standard practice for using node.js and MongoDB. I'm going to recommend Express for creating your API to interface with the database. It provides features such as URL routing right out of the box. However, you can build your own platform, or use any other one that works for your application/environment.

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Thanks really helpful. What I meant with my second question is how can I integrate node main.js with my front end? I already tried copying and pasting main.js nodejs code to my frontend javascript but no luck. –  anvarik Nov 6 '13 at 16:59
1  
I see. I updated my answer to question 2. Hopefully that helps. –  Travis Nov 6 '13 at 17:06
    
Sorry, I am really bad in explaining what I really want to ask. Let's say I have a js belonging to my website frontend.js and inside defined a var fields = getInputTexts() and fields varialbe is being filled by the input texts of my website. I want to send it to mongodb; why can't i just copy main.js and use fields there? On command line we simply type node, but on the browser? Do I need to run my nodejs on the server and listen all the time? –  anvarik Nov 6 '13 at 17:30
    
Yes, you keep your main.js app running on the server at all times listening for HTTP calls that your front-end code will make. Putting the database interface code on the front-end would be a huge security vulnerability. –  Travis Nov 6 '13 at 18:14
    
Thanks a lot :) –  anvarik Nov 7 '13 at 9:00

You could try building a REST API to interact with the MongoDB server(s) using vanilla NodeJS or your choice of quite a few additional frameworks. You might try baucis*.

*Disclaimer: I am the main author of baucis

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looks promising, but I think I will write my own with express. thanks! –  anvarik Nov 7 '13 at 9:01

You should use a REST interface for MongoDB. I like sleepy.mongoose a lot. It runs on python and can take a minute to set up, but is well worth the effort.

Here is a blog by the author which helped get me started.

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so cool, thanks! –  anvarik Nov 6 '13 at 18:47

Here is the Demo App deployed to Heroku, http://nodejs-crud.herokuapp.com/ and the tutorial link is http://codeforbrowser.com/blog/crud-operations-in-node-js-and-mongodb/

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