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We have a generated list:

1. 003
2. 012
3. 021
4. 030
5. 102
6. 111
7. 120
8. 201
9. 210
10. 300

(numbers are from 0 to 3 and their sum is 3)

How to find in what place is a combination without counting them?? Ex. 201 -> index=8 Thanks in advance.

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closed as off-topic by Delan Azabani, Shaggy Frog, Alex K, zero323, Matt Clark Nov 7 '13 at 0:26

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Perhaps this would be better if it were posted to Math.SE... –  abiessu Nov 6 '13 at 16:38
2  
It's called "binary search". –  TC1 Nov 6 '13 at 16:48
1  
The title is a bit misleading. For the more general problem I would have suggested a binary search. –  Mark Ransom Nov 6 '13 at 16:48
1  
@TC1: I don't think they want to perform a search. The permutation has a defined order, the individual digits of each permutation are valued and relevant to that order. It's a mathematical construction of the index from the digits of the permutation. –  Orbling Nov 6 '13 at 16:53
1  
@Orbling if you wanna go that way, they're not permutations, they're weak compositions of 3. He presented it as a list with lexicological ordering, in which case a binary search would find what he needs in O(log N). –  TC1 Nov 6 '13 at 16:59

4 Answers 4

If digits of your number are ABC, then index is:

ndx = A * (8 - A + 1) / 2 + B + 1;

For example, for value ABC=201, we will have:

ndx = 2 * (8 - 2 + 1) / 2 + 0 + 1 = 8; 

Really, value 201 has index 8.

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yeah but where did you get the 8 and why have not used the c value?? –  Katolog Katolog Nov 6 '13 at 17:34
2  
if i have a longer combination with another sum how do i get the index. i need a general way of doing this –  Katolog Katolog Nov 6 '13 at 17:35
    
C values is unused. It defined by values AB. About 8 -- See formula of sum of arithmetic progression. –  maxihatop Nov 6 '13 at 17:35
2  
Sorry, telepats on vacations –  maxihatop Nov 6 '13 at 17:44
1  
@KatologKatolog: If you look at my answer, you'll see that the C value is irrelevant. You can compute the index based only on the first two digits. This is the answer to the question you asked. If you want some other answer, then you need to ask a different question. –  Jim Mischel Nov 6 '13 at 19:26

Not a complete answer, but I think this is a good start.

If you view each digit as two binary digits, you get:

 1. 003  00 00 11
 2. 012  00 01 10
 3. 021  00 10 01
 4. 030  00 11 00
 5. 102  01 00 10
 6. 111  01 01 01
 7. 120  01 10 00
 8. 201  10 00 01
 9. 210  10 01 00
10. 300  11 00 00

If you ignore the right hand column of digits, then the first seven items (values 003 through 120) are the binary representations of the numbers 0 through 6.

The next two items have values 8 and 9, and the last is 12.

So, we can convert the number to a rough index with:

ix = 4*first_digit + second_digit

And then adjust:

if (first_digit < 2)
    ix = ix + 1
else if (first_digit == 3)
    ix = ix - 2

I'm not happy with the conditional there. Is there a mathematical way to make this translation:

0 => 1
1 => 1
2 => 0
3 => -2
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Downvoter? It's customary to supply a comment stating your reason. –  Jim Mischel Nov 6 '13 at 21:39

Right, the comments under the question I have been making are assuming you want to go directly from the current value to the index, without performing a search. That is to say, making some inspection of the digits of the entry and translating that to a 1-indexed number.

Note, this answer is directional and incomplete, just shows the way I would approach the problem.

Looking at your example, if we treat each entry as composed of 3 digits, (z_i, y_i, x_i), then you get the following sequences:

  1. 003; z=0, y=0, x=3
  2. 012; z=0, y=1, x=2
  3. 021; z=0, y=2, x=1
  4. 030; z=0, y=3, x=0
  5. 102; z=1, y=0, x=2
  6. 111; z=1, y=1, x=1
  7. 120; z=1, y=2, x=0
  8. 201; z=2, y=0, x=1
  9. 210; z=2, y=1, x=0
  10. 300; z=3, y=0, x=0

If the max digit is k (=3), then:

x_i = 3, 2, 1, 0, 2, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0 = k, k-1, ..., 0, k-1, ... 0, ......, 0

y_i = 0, 1, 2, 3, 0, 1, 2, 0, 1, 0 = 0, 1, ..., k, 0, ..., k-1, ......, 0

z_i = 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3 = k+1 x 0, k x 1, ......., 1 x k

As you can see, the y_i digit goes up in sequence repetitively, knocking the z_i up at the end of each completion.

If you had more digits, the pattern gets more complicated, but still follows a similar pattern.

For k=4:

  1. 0004
  2. 0013
  3. 0022
  4. 0031
  5. 0040
  6. 0103
  7. 0112
  8. 0121
  9. 0130
  10. 0202
  11. 0211
  12. 0220
  13. 0301
  14. 0310
  15. 0400
  16. 1003
  17. 1012
  18. 1021
  19. 1030
  20. 1102
  21. 1111
  22. 1120
  23. 1201
  24. 1210
  25. 1300
  26. 2002
  27. 2011
  28. 2020
  29. 2101
  30. 2110
  31. 2200
  32. 3001
  33. 3010
  34. 3100
  35. 4000

The total entries can be seen from the first or last column, it is the triangle number of the triangle number of k+1, in the case of k=4. For k=3, it's just the triangle of k+1.

Triangle-triangle numbers

Not having it worked it out, but that pattern might indicate successive summations as the number of digits increases.

There is a pattern still:

k=3:

Triangle numbers

k=4:

Triangle squared?

k=5:

Triangle cubed?

Or in general for the total number of entries in the sequence of length k:

Summation sequence total entries

This knowledge helps give us a hand in finding the scalars for the first digit, and the rest of the problem is effectively a sub problem for k-1. Defeating me at the moment...

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