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I have written a tiny recursive bit of F# code to see how many levels of recursion I can fit onto the stack under .NET/Mono. It just prints the recursion depth whenever it is an exact power of 2, so I find out the maximum depth to within a factor 2.

I start the code in a thread with a defined amount of stack space using System.Threading.Thread (ThreadStart, int). Under .Net it seems to take approx 100 bytes per level of recursion, and I can get about 16 million levels on a 2G stack. The memory usage is broadly similar under Mono, however I can only get about 30 thousand levels. Increasing the stack size value passed to Thread past over about 600000 does not increase the recursion depth.

ulimit reports the stack size limit is 1G.

An obvious explanation is that Mono will not obey the second argument of Thread if it is too large. Does anybody please know how to convince Mono to allocate a large stack?

The code is trivial, but it's below just in case someone cares:

let rec f i =
    if popcount i = 1 then // population count is one on exact powers of 2
        printf "Got up to %d\n" i
        stdout.Flush ()
    if i = 1000000000 then 0 else 1 + f (i+1)
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FYI default .NET application stack size is 1 MB. See Stack capacity in C#. There is also a link to a detailed article on changing stack size. –  Palec Nov 14 '13 at 21:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted
+50

Option 1: Change Mono Stack Size

An obvious explanation is that Mono will not obey the second argument of Thread if it is too large. Does anybody please know how to convince Mono to allocate a large stack?

You are correct that Mono will limit the stack size, even if you pass in a large value. For example, on my Cent OS 64-bit test machine, the maximum stack size that Mono will allocate is 2 megabytes. The Mono C# source file Thread.cs shows us what happens when you create a Mono thread:

public Thread (ThreadStart start, int maxStackSize)
{
    if (start == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException ("start");

    threadstart = start;
    Internal.stack_size = CheckStackSize (maxStackSize);
}

static int CheckStackSize (int maxStackSize)
{
    if (maxStackSize < 0)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException ("less than zero", "maxStackSize");

    if (maxStackSize < 131072) // make sure stack is at least 128k big
        return 131072;

    int page_size = Environment.GetPageSize ();

    if ((maxStackSize % page_size) != 0) // round up to a divisible of page size
        maxStackSize = (maxStackSize / (page_size - 1)) * page_size;

    int default_stack_size = (IntPtr.Size / 4) * 1024 * 1024; // from wthreads.c
    if (maxStackSize > default_stack_size)
        return default_stack_size;

    return maxStackSize; 
}

The code above puts a hard limit on the stack size.

You could in theory change code in one or both of the above functions (bold lines) so that a larger stack size is allocated. Once you did this you would have to build the Mono runtime and then run your function to see if the change makes a difference.

I should stress that I do not know enough about Mono to understand if allocating a larger stack will help in your specific case. I would only do this as a last resort (if neither of my other answers work).

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Many thanks. I would guess the reason is that bad things happen to the garbage collector complexity if the stack grows too far, though that does not explain a laughably small hardwired limit. –  Joe Huha Nov 11 '13 at 19:37
    
@JoeHuha - I found this code commit, which adds the function CheckStackSize, but there is no mention of why. –  chue x Nov 12 '13 at 14:01
    
My guess as to why there is such a small limit: to keep behavior in line with .Net: "only fully trusted code can set maxStackSize to a value that is greater than the default stack size (1 megabyte). If a larger value is specified for maxStackSize when code is running with partial trust, maxStackSize is ignored" –  chue x Nov 12 '13 at 14:02
    
Some of the comments in Mono suggest the limit is a temporary workaround. It's not clear for what, though the number of threads that can be created might be somehow related to it. Either way, simply ripping out the limit from the C# code seems to work for me. The memory allocator complains a bit (for what may be unrelated reasons), but it still runs fast enough. Many thanks for your help. –  Joe Huha Nov 13 '13 at 11:54

Option 2: F# Tail calls

One option is to rewrite your method so that you use recursive tail calls. From the prior (Wikipedia) link:

A tail recursive function is a special case of recursion in which the last instruction executed in the method is the recursive call. F# and many other functional languages can optimize tail recursive functions; since no extra work is performed after the recursive call, there is no need for the function to remember where it came from, and hence no reason to allocate additional memory on the stack.

F# optimizes tail-recursive functions by telling the CLR to drop the current stack frame before executing the target function. As a result, tail-recursive functions can recurse indefinitely without consuming stack space.

There is a caveat - Mono does not fully support tail recursive calls - what you should do is to test first in the .Net runtime, and then see if the code will run in Mono.

Here is your sample function re-written using a tail recursive call - it does work in both .NET (using Visual Studio 2010) and Mono (Mono version 3.2.0, F# 3.0):

let f i =
    let rec loop acc counter =
        // display progress every 10k iterations
        let j = counter % 10000
        if j = 0 then
            printf "Got up to %d\n" counter
            stdout.Flush ()

        if counter < 1000000000 then
            // tail recursive
            loop (acc + 1) (counter + 1)
        else
            acc

    loop 0 i

For input value 1:

let result = f 1
printf "result %d\n" result

The output:

Got up to 10000
Got up to 20000
Got up to 30000
...
Got up to 999980000
Got up to 999990000
Got up to 1000000000
result 999999999

For input value 999,999,998:

let result = f 999999998
printf "result %d\n" result

The output:

Got up to 1000000000
result 2

The code above uses two variables to keep track of progress:

acc - the accumulator, which stores the result of the calculation

counter - is simply the number of recursive calls

Why is your sample code not tail recursive?

Paraphrasing the How To Write Tail-Recursive Functions section of the Wikipedia article, we can rewrite this line of your code:

if i = 1000000000 then 0 else 1 + f (i+1)

as

if i = 1000000000 then 0
else
    let intermediate = f (i+1) // recursion
    let result = 1 + intermediate // additional operations
    result

The very definition of tail recursion says that there cannot be additional operations after the recursive call. As we can see in the rewritten version of your code, there are additional operations required to produce the result.

Resources

share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks. However, the problem (as you observe) is that Mono will not always do tail calls when it should. My code already is tail-recursive and runs just fine under .net. But Mono runs out of stack very quickly on the same code, and with just 30k recursion levels to play with there is not much I can do work around it. (I have upvoted your other answer as that gets very close to what I wanted to know, even though it just explains how Mono limits the stack size rather than why and how to avoid it - but it is progress well worth the bounty. Thanks.) –  Joe Huha Nov 11 '13 at 19:23
    
There's an older question here on the topic: Tailcall elimination in Mono –  Palec Nov 14 '13 at 21:08

Option 3: Make it Iterative

One option is to rewrite your method so that it is not recursive, but iterative. That is, you change the method so that it is a loop that calculates the results:

let f i =
    let mutable acc = 0
    for counter in i .. 1000000000 do
        // display progress every 10k iterations
        let j = counter % 10000
        if j = 0 then
            printf "Got up to %d\n" counter
            stdout.Flush ()

        if counter < 1000000000 then
            acc <- acc + 1
    acc

For input value 1:

let result = f 1
printf "result %d\n" result

The output:

Got up to 10000
Got up to 20000
Got up to 30000
...
Got up to 999980000
Got up to 999990000
Got up to 1000000000
result 999999999

For input value 999,999,998:

let result = f 999999998
printf "result %d\n" result

The output:

Got up to 1000000000
result 2

The code above uses two variables to keep track of progress:

acc - the accumulater, which stores the result of the calculation

counter - is simply the number of iterative calls (number of loops)

Since we are using a loop to calculate the result, there is not any additional stack allocated.

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