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How do you reverse a string in C or C++ without requiring a separate buffer to hold the reversed string?

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6  
The code in the accepted answer is appallingly wrong. See stackoverflow.com/a/21263068/88656 for details. –  Eric Lippert Jan 21 at 16:17

26 Answers 26

up vote 89 down vote accepted

Evil C:

#include <stdio.h>

void strrev(char *p)
{
  char *q = p;
  while(q && *q) ++q;
  for(--q; p < q; ++p, --q)
    *p = *p ^ *q,
    *q = *p ^ *q,
    *p = *p ^ *q;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
  do {
    printf("%s ",  argv[argc-1]);
    strrev(argv[argc-1]);
    printf("%s\n", argv[argc-1]);
  } while(--argc);

  return 0;
}

(This is XOR-swap thing. Take care to note that you must avoid swapping with self, because a^a==0.)


Ok, fine, let's fix the UTF-8 chars...

#include <bits/types.h>
#include <stdio.h>

#define SWP(x,y) (x^=y, y^=x, x^=y)

void strrev(char *p)
{
  char *q = p;
  while(q && *q) ++q; /* find eos */
  for(--q; p < q; ++p, --q) SWP(*p, *q);
}

void strrev_utf8(char *p)
{
  char *q = p;
  strrev(p); /* call base case */

  /* Ok, now fix bass-ackwards UTF chars. */
  while(q && *q) ++q; /* find eos */
  while(p < --q)
    switch( (*q & 0xF0) >> 4 ) {
    case 0xF: /* U+010000-U+10FFFF: four bytes. */
      SWP(*(q-0), *(q-3));
      SWP(*(q-1), *(q-2));
      q -= 3;
      break;
    case 0xE: /* U+000800-U+00FFFF: three bytes. */
      SWP(*(q-0), *(q-2));
      q -= 2;
      break;
    case 0xC: /* fall-through */
    case 0xD: /* U+000080-U+0007FF: two bytes. */
      SWP(*(q-0), *(q-1));
      q--;
      break;
    }
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
  do {
    printf("%s ",  argv[argc-1]);
    strrev_utf8(argv[argc-1]);
    printf("%s\n", argv[argc-1]);
  } while(--argc);

  return 0;
}
  • Why, yes, if the input is borked, this will cheerfully swap outside the place.
  • Useful link when vandalising in the UNICODE: http://www.macchiato.com/unicode/chart/
  • Also, UTF-8 over 0x10000 is untested (as I don't seem to have any font for it, nor the patience to use a hexeditor)

Examples:

$ ./strrev Räksmörgås ░▒▓○◔◑◕●

░▒▓○◔◑◕● ●◕◑◔○▓▒░

Räksmörgås sågrömskäR

./strrev verrts/.
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94  
There's no good reason to use XOR swap outside of an obfuscated code competition. –  Chris Conway Oct 13 '08 at 17:02
21  
1. XOR-swap can swap arbitrary size elements without allocating any intermediate storage. (Admittedly not relevant.) 2. I like it. –  Anders Eurenius Oct 13 '08 at 17:09
16  
I'd say that if you are going to ask for "In place" without being more specific, it HAS to be the xor thing. Anything else isn't in-place. That said, this has no business being in production code anywhere ever. if you're ever even tempted to use it, quit engineering now. –  Bill K Oct 13 '08 at 17:24
17  
You think "in-place" means "no extra memory", not even O(1) memory for temporaries? What about the space on the stack for str and the return address? –  Chris Conway Oct 13 '08 at 17:30
31  
@Bill, that's not what the common definition of “in-place” means. In-place algorithms may use additional memory. However, the amount of this additional memory must not depend on the input – i.e. it must be constant. Therefore, swapping of values using additional storage is completely in-place. –  Konrad Rudolph Oct 13 '08 at 17:31
#include <algorithm>
std::reverse(str.begin(), str.end());

This is the simplest way in C++.

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75  
simple question, simple answer... –  Greg Rogers Oct 13 '08 at 21:45
12  
Why would the answer need to be any longer? –  korona Oct 14 '08 at 8:13
7  
I seriously doubt if this was the expected answer ! –  Sushant Jan 25 '12 at 1:44
6  
#include <algorithm> –  Tom Jul 22 '12 at 3:50
6  
@fredsbend, the "ridiculously long" version of the selected answer handles a case which this simple answer doesn't - UTF-8 input. It shows the importance of fully specifying the problem. Besides the question was about code that would work in C as well. –  Mark Ransom Aug 16 '13 at 14:45

Read Kernighan and Ritchie

#include <string.h>

void reverse(char s[])
{
      int length = strlen(s) ;
      int c, i, j;

      for (i = 0, j = length - 1; i < j; i++, j--)
     {
         c = s[i];
         s[i] = s[j];
         s[j] = c;
      }
}
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3  
Tested on my iphone this is slower than using raw pointer addresses by about 15% –  PsychoDad Apr 29 '13 at 20:16
1  
Shouldn't variable "c" be a char instead of an int? –  Lesswire Nov 17 '13 at 17:25
    
@Lesswire - In C, whenever a character constant or variable is used in an expression in C, it is automatically converted & treated as an integer. If you have a linux termminal, you can see the ascii codes by typing man ascii –  user1527227 Apr 9 at 1:48
2  
Its important to note in this example that the string s must be declared in an array form. In other words, char s[] = "this is ok" rather than char *s="cannot do this" because the latter results in a string constant which cannot be modified –  user1527227 Apr 9 at 1:50
    
length, i, j should be size_t, but then would have trouble when length == 0. –  chux Jun 13 at 22:16

Non-evil C, assuming the common case where the string is a null-terminated char array:

#include <stddef.h>
#include <string.h>

/* PRE: str must be either NULL or a pointer to a 
 * (possibly empty) null-terminated string. */
void strrev(char *str) {
  char temp, *end_ptr;

  /* If str is NULL or empty, do nothing */
  if( str == NULL || !(*str) )
    return;

  end_ptr = str + strlen(str) - 1;

  /* Swap the chars */
  while( end_ptr > str ) {
    temp = *str;
    *str = *end_ptr;
    *end_ptr = temp;
    str++;
    end_ptr--;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You don't need the stddef.h and string.h headers. –  Robert Gamble Oct 13 '08 at 17:18
    
I need stddef, but not stdio. –  Chris Conway Oct 13 '08 at 17:27
    
Rather than using a while loop to find the end pointer, can't you use something like end_ptr = str + strlen (str); I know that will do practically the same thing, but I find it clearer. –  QuantumPete Oct 13 '08 at 17:43
    
Fair enough. I was trying (and failing) to avoid the off-by-one error in @uvote's answer. –  Chris Conway Oct 13 '08 at 19:57
    
Aside from a potential performance improvement with maybe int temp, this solution looks best. +1 –  chux Jun 13 at 22:17

You use std::reverse algorithm from the C++ Standard Library.

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1  
Standard Template Library –  Federico A. Ramponi Oct 13 '08 at 17:17
7  
Standard Template Library is a pre-standard term. The C++ standard does not mention it, and former STL components are in the C++ Standard Library. –  Nemanja Trifunovic Oct 13 '08 at 17:26
14  
right. i always wonder why so many people still call it "STL" even though it just serves to confuse the matter. would be nicer if more people are like you and call it just "C++ Standard Library" or STL and say "STandard Library" :) –  Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 21 '09 at 1:49

It's been a while and I don't remember which book taught me this algorithm, but I thought it was quite ingenious and simple to understand:

char input[] = "moc.wolfrevokcats";

int length = strlen(input);
int last_pos = length-1;
for(int i = 0; i < length/2; i++)
{
    char tmp = input[i];
    input[i] = input[last_pos - i];
    input[last_pos - i] = tmp;
}

printf("%s\n", input);
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Note that the beauty of std::reverse is that it works with char * strings and std::wstrings just as well as std::strings

void strrev(char *str)
{
    if (str == NULL)
        return;
    std::reverse(str, str + strlen(str));
}
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If you're looking for reversing NULL terminated buffers, most solutions posted here are OK. But, as Tim Farley already pointed out, these algorithms will work only if it's valid to assume that a string is semantically an array of bytes (i.e. single-byte strings), which is a wrong assumption, I think.

Take for example, the string "año" (year in Spanish).

The Unicode code points are 0x61, 0xf1, 0x6f.

Consider some of the most used encodings:

Latin1 / iso-8859-1 (single byte encoding, 1 character is 1 byte and vice versa):

Original:

0x61, 0xf1, 0x6f, 0x00

Reverse:

0x6f, 0xf1, 0x61, 0x00

The result is OK

UTF-8:

Original:

0x61, 0xc3, 0xb1, 0x6f, 0x00

Reverse:

0x6f, 0xb1, 0xc3, 0x61, 0x00

The result is gibberish and an illegal UTF-8 sequence

UTF-16 Big Endian:

Original:

0x00, 0x61, 0x00, 0xf1, 0x00, 0x6f, 0x00, 0x00

The first byte will be treated as a NUL-terminator. No reversing will take place.

UTF-16 Little Endian:

Original:

0x61, 0x00, 0xf1, 0x00, 0x6f, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00

The second byte will be treated as a NUL-terminator. The result will be 0x61, 0x00, a string containing the 'a' character.

share|improve this answer
    
std::reverse will work for two-byte unicode types, as long as you're using wstring. –  Eclipse Oct 13 '08 at 19:02
    
I'm not very familiar with C++, but my guess is that any respectable standard library function dealing with strings will be able to handle different encodings, so I agree with you. By "these algorithms", I meant the ad-hoc reverse functions posted here. –  Juan Pablo Califano Oct 13 '08 at 19:10
    
Unfortunately, there's no such thing as "respectable function dealing with strings" in standard C++. –  Jem Mar 30 '12 at 14:08
    
@Eclipse If it reverses a surrogate pair, the result won't be correct anymore. Unicode is not actually a fixed-width charset –  Lưu Vĩnh Phúc May 17 at 3:55

In the interest of completeness, it should be pointed out that there are representations of strings on various platforms in which the number of bytes per character varies depending on the character. Old-school programmers would refer to this as DBCS (Double Byte Character Set). Modern programmers more commonly encounter this in UTF-8 (as well as UTF-16 and others). There are other such encodings as well.

In any of these variable-width encoding schemes, the simple algorithms posted here (evil, non-evil or otherwise) would not work correctly at all! In fact, they could even cause the string to become illegible or even an illegal string in that encoding scheme. See Juan Pablo Califano's answer for some good examples.

std::reverse() potentially would still work in this case, as long as your platform's implementation of the Standard C++ Library (in particular, string iterators) properly took this into account.

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3  
std::reverse does NOT take this into account. It reverses value_type's. In the std::string case, it reverses char's. Not characters. –  MSalters Oct 14 '08 at 7:24

Reverse a string in place (visualization):

Reverse a string in place

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Use the std::reverse method from STL:

std::reverse(str.begin(), str.end());

You will have to include the "algorithm" library, #include<algorithm>.

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1  
Which library needs to be included? –  Don Cruickshank Aug 2 '13 at 10:09
    
#include<algorithm> I forgot to write it and then edited the answer but it wasnt saved, thats why name was missing.. –  user2628229 Aug 2 '13 at 10:32
#include <cstdio>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <string>

void strrev(char *str)
{
        if( str == NULL )
                return;

        char *end_ptr = &str[strlen(str) - 1];
        char temp;
        while( end_ptr > str )
        {
                temp = *str;
                *str++ = *end_ptr;
                *end_ptr-- = temp;
        }
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
        char buffer[32];

        strcpy(buffer, "testing");
        strrev(buffer);
        printf("%s\n", buffer);

        strcpy(buffer, "a");
        strrev(buffer);
        printf("%s\n", buffer);

        strcpy(buffer, "abc");
        strrev(buffer);
        printf("%s\n", buffer);

        strcpy(buffer, "");
        strrev(buffer);
        printf("%s\n", buffer);

        strrev(NULL);

        return 0;
}

This code produces this output:

gnitset
a
cba
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2  
@uvote, Don't use strcpy. Ever. If you have to use something like strcpy use strncpy. strcpy is dangerous. By the way C and C++ are two separate languages with separate facilities. I think you're using header files only available in C++ so do you really need an answer in C? –  Onorio Catenacci Oct 13 '08 at 16:48
    
If the string is empty, strlen will return 0 and you will index outside the array which is illegal in C (you can address one element past the end of an array but not one element before). –  Robert Gamble Oct 13 '08 at 16:48
4  
strcpy is perfectly safe if the programmer can keep track of the size of his arrays, many would argue that strncpy is less safe since it does not guarantee the resulting string is null terminated. In any case, there is nothing wrong with uvote's use of strcpy here. –  Robert Gamble Oct 13 '08 at 16:52
2  
Anyone that can't use strcpy properly shouldn't be programming in C. –  Robert Gamble Oct 13 '08 at 18:15
2  
@Robert Gamble, I agree. However, since I don't know of any way to keep people from programming in C no matter what their competence, I usually recommend against this. –  Onorio Catenacci Oct 13 '08 at 18:35

In case you are using GLib, it has two functions for that, g_strreverse() and g_utf8_strreverse()

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Recursive function to reverse a string in place (no extra buffer, malloc).

Short, sexy code. Bad, bad stack usage.

#include <stdio.h>

/* Store the each value and move to next char going down
 * the stack. Assign value to start ptr and increment 
 * when coming back up the stack (return).
 * Neat code, horrible stack usage.
 *
 * val - value of current pointer.
 * s - start pointer
 * n - next char pointer in string.
 */
char *reverse_r(char val, char *s, char *n)
{
    if (*n)
        s = reverse_r(*n, s, n+1);
   *s = val;
   return s+1;
}

/*
 * expect the string to be passed as argv[1]
 */
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    char *aString;

    if (argc < 2)
    {
        printf("Usage: RSIP <string>\n");
        return 0;
    }

    aString = argv[1];
    printf("String to reverse: %s\n", aString );

    reverse_r(*aString, aString, aString+1); 
    printf("Reversed String:   %s\n", aString );

    return 0;
}
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1  
That's a quite fun solution, you should add some tracing like printf("%*s > [%d] reverse_r('%c', %p=\"%s\", %p=\"%s\")\n", depth, " ", depth, val, s, (s ? s : "null"), n, (n ? n : "null")); at the start and < at the end. –  Benoît Oct 15 '13 at 20:59
    
-1 i notice just the 'bad bad stack usage part' –  George Polevoy Nov 12 at 8:54

I like Evgeny's K&R answer. However, it is nice to see a version using pointers. Otherwise, it's essentially the same:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char *reverse(char *str) {
    if( str == NULL || !(*str) ) return NULL;
    int i, j = strlen(str)-1;
    char *sallocd;
    sallocd = malloc(sizeof(char) * (j+1));
    for(i=0; j>=0; i++, j--) {
        *(sallocd+i) = *(str+j);
    }
    return sallocd;
}

int main(void) {
    char *s = "a man a plan a canal panama";
    char *sret = reverse(s);
    printf("%s\n", reverse(sret));
    free(sret);
    return 0;
}
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Another C++ way (though I would probably use std::reverse() myself :) as being more expressive and faster)

str = std::string(str.rbegin(), str.rend());

The C way (more or less :) ) and please, be careful about XOR trick for swapping, compilers usually cannot optimize that.

In such case it is usually much slower.

char* reverse(char* s)
{
    char* beg = s-1, *end = s, tmp;
    while (*++end);
    while (end-- > ++beg)
    { 
        tmp  = *beg; 
        *beg = *end;  
        *end =  tmp;  
    }
    return s;
}
share|improve this answer

Here's my take on it in C. Did it for practice and tried to be as concise as possible! You enter a string via the command line, i.e ./program_name "enter string here"

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

void reverse(int s,int e,int len,char t,char* arg) {
   for(;s<len/2;t=arg[s],arg[s++]=arg[e],arg[e--]=t);
}

int main(int argc,char* argv[]) {
  int s=0,len=strlen(argv[1]),e=len-1; char t,*arg=argv[1];
  reverse(s,e,len,t,arg);
  for(s=0,e=0;e<=len;arg[e]==' '||arg[e]=='\0'?reverse(s,e-1,e+s,t,arg),s=++e:e++);
  printf("%s\n",arg);
}
share|improve this answer

Yet another:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <strings.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv) {

  char *reverse = argv[argc-1];
  char *left = reverse;
  int length = strlen(reverse);
  char *right = reverse+length-1;
  char temp;

  while(right-left>=1){

    temp=*left;
    *left=*right;
    *right=temp;
    ++left;
    --right;

  }

  printf("%s\n", reverse);

}
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3  
This doesn't really add anything to the accepted answer... –  alestanis Oct 21 '12 at 9:04
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdbool.h>

unsigned char * utf8_reverse(const unsigned char *, int);
void assert_true(bool);

int main(void)
{
    unsigned char str[] = "mañana mañana";
    unsigned char *ret = utf8_reverse(str,  strlen((const char *) str) + 1);

    printf("%s\n", ret);
    assert_true(0 == strncmp((const char *) ret, "anãnam anañam", strlen("anãnam anañam") + 1));

    free(ret);

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

unsigned char * utf8_reverse(const unsigned char *str, int size)
{
    unsigned char *ret = calloc(size, sizeof(unsigned char*));
    int ret_size = 0;
    int pos = size - 2;
    int char_size = 0;

    if (str ==  NULL) {
        fprintf(stderr, "failed to allocate memory.\n");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }

    while (pos > -1) {

        if (str[pos] < 0x80) {
            char_size = 1;
        } else if (pos > 0 && str[pos - 1] > 0xC1 && str[pos - 1] < 0xE0) {
            char_size = 2;
        } else if (pos > 1 && str[pos - 2] > 0xDF && str[pos - 2] < 0xF0) {
            char_size = 3;
        } else if (pos > 2 && str[pos - 3] > 0xEF && str[pos - 3] < 0xF5) {
            char_size = 4;
        } else {
            char_size = 1;
        }

        pos -= char_size;
        memcpy(ret + ret_size, str + pos + 1, char_size);
        ret_size += char_size;
    }    

    ret[ret_size] = '\0';

    return ret;
}

void assert_true(bool boolean)
{
    puts(boolean == true ? "true" : "false");
}
share|improve this answer

If you are using CString, call stringname.MakeReverse();

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If you don't need to store it, you can reduce the time spent like this:

void showReverse(char s[], int length)
{
    printf("Reversed String without storing is ");
    //could use another variable to test for length, keeping length whole.
    //assumes contiguous memory
    for (; length > 0; length--)
    {
        printf("%c", *(s+ length-1) );
    }
    printf("\n");
}
share|improve this answer

But I think the XOR swap algorithm is the best...

char str[]= {"I am doing reverse string"};
char* pStr = str;

for(int i = 0; i != ((int)strlen(str)-1)/2; i++)
{
    char b = *(pStr+i);
    *(pStr+i) = *(pStr+strlen(str)-1-i);
    *(pStr+strlen(str)-1-i) = b;
}
share|improve this answer

Share my code. As a C++ learner, as an option to use swap(), I am humbly asking for comments.

void reverse(char* str) {
    int length = strlen(str);
    char* str_head = str;
    char* str_tail = &str[length-1];
    while (str_head < str_tail) 
        swap(*str_head++, *str_tail--);
}
share|improve this answer
#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>

int main()
{
    char *my_string = "THIS_IS_MY_STRING";
    char *rev_my_string = my_string;

    while (*++rev_my_string != '\0')
        ;

    while (rev_my_string-- != (my_string-1))
    {
        printf("%c", *rev_my_string);
    }

    getchar();
    return 0;
}

This is optimised code in the C language for reversing a string... And it is simple; just use a simple pointer to do the job...

share|improve this answer
/**
   I am a boy -> boy a am I
*/
    int main()
    {
        int i, j, n, temp, temp_i, cnt;
        //char *array = "Samsung";
        char array[1000];
        char newarr[strlen(array)];
        printf("Enter The String: \n");
        gets(array);

        for(i = (strlen(array)-1), n = 0, j = 0; i >= 0; i--)
        {
         if( array[i] != ' ')
         {
             n++;
         }
         else
         {
             temp = n;
             temp_i = i;
             for(n = 0; n <= temp; n++)
             {
               //  i = i + 1;
                 newarr[j++] = array[i++];
             }
             i = temp_i;
             n = 0;
         }

         if(i == 0)
         {
             newarr[j++] = ' ';
             temp = n;
             temp_i = i;
             for(n = 0; n <= temp; n++)
             {
               //  i = i + 1;
                 newarr[j++] = array[i++];
             }
             i = temp_i;
             n = 0;
         }


         //newarr[j++] = array[i];
        }
        newarr[j] = '\0';
        cnt = 0;
        for(j = 0; j <= (strlen(newarr)-1); j++)//This is not required just do some R n D
        {
            newarr[j] = newarr[++cnt];
        }
       //  printf("The first element is %c \n", newarr[1]);
        puts(newarr);
        return 0;
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
Neither does your code reverse a string (it reverses the order of words,) nor does it do what it does in-place. –  Nikhil Dabas Jun 8 '12 at 20:02
    
@Nikhil Dabas: This code is working try it once again.I wrote the code in CODE::BLOCKS in Windows XP. –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak Jun 12 '12 at 10:37
1  
Your solution does "I am a boy" -> "boy a am I" but the question is about "I am a boy" -> "yob a ma I", and doing that in-place, that is, without a temporary copy like your newarr variable. I never said that your code doesn't work; it's just not the answer to this question. –  Nikhil Dabas Jun 12 '12 at 13:56

Here is the cleanest, safest, easiest way to reverse a string in C++ (in my opinion):

#include <string>

void swap(std::string& str, int index1, int index2) {

    char temp = str[index1];
    str[index1] = str[index2];
    str[index2] = temp;

}

void reverse(std::string& str) {

    for (int i = 0; i < str.size() / 2; i++)
        swap(str, i, str.size() - i - 1);

}

An alternative is to use std::swap, but I like defining my own functions - it's an interesting exercise and you don't need to include anything extra.

share|improve this answer

protected by hjpotter92 Oct 10 '13 at 21:20

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