Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a fairly standard creational pattern whereby a class exposes a static method for returning instances of itself, like so:

public class MyClass {

    private MyClass(/*parameter list*/) {
        // internal construction
    }    

    public static MyClass GetMyClass(/*parameter list*/) {
        return new MyClass(/*parameter list*/);
    }
}

...

//this line wont break in the debugger and seemingly never gets called - why?
MyClass inst = MyClass.GetMyClass(/*parameter list*/);

However, inst is always null. I can't break on the line that calls the static method, the debugger just ignores it - what's going on?

Edit: Thanks for the suggestions.

  • All projects have been cleaned and rebuilt (manully in NetBeans)
  • I have added a break in the static method and no it isn't hit.
  • Yes, the code above is being called (ultimately) in a constructor for a Swing 'FrameView' though it surely shouldn't matter where I am calling this from, should it?
  • There is no exception swallowing anywhere

Side note, other than the missing class declaration (which was a typo) why is this not valid Java? Why is this obviously C# code? Explanations would be more helpful than downvotes :)

Edit II: The Params is just supposed to indicate a whole load of parameters - sorry if this confused anyone, I obviously know parameters have type declarations and so on, the code above was intended as a quick shorthand version rather than a full and (complicated) real sample...

share|improve this question
2  
spot the C# programmer :) Please try and post valid, compiling Java (which this isn't). –  skaffman Dec 30 '09 at 19:44
    
Where is that line that is invoking GetMyClass located? In a constructor, static/final init block in another class perhaps? It's also worth noting that the code posted is very C# and not valid Java in most places –  Kristopher Ives Dec 30 '09 at 19:44
    
The code you've provided isn't Java code, so it's sort of hard to help you.... –  delfuego Dec 30 '09 at 19:46
    
Why you started with public MyClass and not public class MyClass? –  Y. Shoham Dec 30 '09 at 19:53
1  
No offense meant, Malcolm, but your method declarations aren't in any way valid Java, and to explain that is to recognize that you've not even tried to learn the language syntax for Java. But in any event, when you're declaring a method, the signature includes the types of each variable -- e.g., public static MyClass GetMyClass(List<Object> Params). But there's a lot more to it than that -- like the fact that methods and parameters start with lower-case letters, and a whole lot more. –  delfuego Dec 30 '09 at 20:41

7 Answers 7

A couple of options:

  • An exception is being thrown which you're somehow missing
  • You're not debugging the code that you think you are (i.e. your built code is out of date with your source code)

The latter is the most likely one, IMO.

share|improve this answer

Apparently you're swallowing an exception inside the constructor something like:

try {
    // Something.
} catch (Exception e) {
}

You should never do that. It makes debugging and nailing down the root cause much harder. Rather throw it or at least do a e.printStackTrace(). If throwing and you don't want to use the throws clause for some reasons, consider using a RuntimeException (or one of its subclasses). E.g.

try {
    // Something.
} catch (Exception e) {
    throw new RuntimeException("Construction failed.", e); // Try to be more specific, e.g. IllegalArgumentException or so. Or just write robust code, i.e. nullchecks and so on.
}

or (but in my opinion not very applicable in your case):

try {
    // Something.
} catch (Exception e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}
share|improve this answer

I understand that you are trying to make a simple example to show your problem, however if you add the appropriate type statements into your sample code, then it both compiles and does what you expect.

However, in your original codebase you could simply place the breakpoint in the static method to see whether or not it is called.

Maybe a simple question, but you never know… are you sure that you are running the code that you think you are running? That is, is everything recompiled and built from the latest sources?

share|improve this answer

There is nothing wrong with :

MyClass inst = MyClass.GetMyClass(Params);

It depends what is before or after that line of code.

share|improve this answer

Start by doing this:

public class MyClass 
{
    private MyClass(/*parameter list*/) 
    {
        System.out.println("entering MyClass(...)");
        // internal construction
        System.out.println("leaving MyClass(...)");
    }    

    // Java uses lower case for method names - so get not Get
    public static MyClass getMyClass(/*parameter list*/) 
    {
        final MyClass foo;

        System.out.println("entering getMyClass(...)");

        foo = new MyClass(...);

        System.out.println("leaving getMyClass(...)");

        return (foo);
    }
}

...

MyClass inst = MyClass.getMyClass(/*parameter list*/);

See if outside the debugger the code gets called.

If you are catching any exceptions, at the very least do:

catch(final WhateverException ex)
{
    // at the very least do this so you can see that the exception happens
    ex.printStackTrace();
}

Avoid catching Throwable, Error, Exception, and RuntimeException. Infact the best way do do it is get rid of all the catch statements and then only add catches for what the compiler tells you that you have to have.

The other thing is you do not say where MyClass inst = MyClass.getMyClass(/parameter list/); is called from. It is entirely possible that that line never gets hit.

share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't public static MyClass getMyClass(/*parameter list*/) return foo ? –  Reuben Mallaby Dec 30 '09 at 21:14
    
yeah I fixed that... :-) –  TofuBeer Dec 30 '09 at 21:32

You mention that you're calling this from the constructor of a FrameView, but I assume you're talking about an implementation or extension of that interface/object. My reasoning was to make sure you wern't recursively invoking the constructor.

share|improve this answer

I think the reason why catching java.lang.Exception isn't catching the problem is because it is likely too specific in this case. Try catching java.lang.Throwable which will catch errors like java.lang.NoClassDefFoundError - that frequently crops up when you have a jar missing somewhere.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.