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Let's say I don't need with the mainstream number system that starts at zero and increases or decreases infinitely. What I need is a cyclic number system that starts at 0 and ends at 5, pretty much like the angular system of a circle. So, if I do additions, it goes something like this:

0+1=1
1+1=2
2+1=3
3+1=4
4+1=5
5+1=0

Now, our programming languages use the traditional number system. Is there any workaround that if I type 5+1, the programming language will give me 0 every time and not the 6 symbol? No matter, if that is a Python, C, D, or other programming solution.

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closed as off-topic by iCodez, soldier.moth, Luiggi Mendoza, Hyperboreus, Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Nov 6 '13 at 20:36

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That's a pretty useless number system. –  iCodez Nov 6 '13 at 20:24
1  
Modulo operator? –  DrummerB Nov 6 '13 at 20:26
1  
@DoxyLover: Yeah, but nothing costs more than 5 either. Plus, if something is too expensive, wait for the price to go up 16% and now it's free. –  abarnert Nov 6 '13 at 20:28
1  
@Luiggi Mendoza base 6, 5 + 1 = 10 –  user1631616 Nov 6 '13 at 20:30
1  
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about Martians. –  Hyperboreus Nov 6 '13 at 20:33

1 Answer 1

You are looking for arithmetic modulo 6:

for i in range(6):
    print('{}+1 = {}'.format(i, (i+1)%6))

yields

0+1 = 1
1+1 = 2
2+1 = 3
3+1 = 4
4+1 = 5
5+1 = 0
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It might be worth pointing out that in C, instead of %6, the answer is %6. And in D, it's %6. And in Ruby, it's %6. And in bash, it's %6. And… (It's always worth learning as many languages as possible to see all the different ways to do things.) –  abarnert Nov 6 '13 at 20:29
    
Yes, but that does not look a very permanent solution. If I type 5+1 below your code, inside the same script, it will still give me 6. –  Ardit S. Nov 6 '13 at 20:31
    
In Python, numbers like 5 are immutable. You can not change its __add__ method, for instance. So there is no way (without modifying Python itself) to make 5+1 evaluate to 0. –  unutbu Nov 6 '13 at 20:35
    
You can subclass int and override __add__ and the like... –  kindall Nov 6 '13 at 20:39
    
@kindall: True, but you can't make 5 an instance of the subclass. I think Ardit wants to literally type 5+1 and have it evaluate to 0. –  unutbu Nov 6 '13 at 20:40

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