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My questions are:

  1. Do any of you experts use the concept of the javascript date "object" (ms) as a "date standard" and store it in your dbs?

  2. Are there pros and cons to this idea?

Background:

Recently I've been working on the Javascript Date object and its use. As an exercise I created THIS page to allow me to understand each command's usage, but also to serve as a reference for me.

The concept of the "object" (milliseconds) as a standard way of storing dates is intruiging so I pounded out code that would create an "object", store it in a table as a varchar, pull it out and use it for whatever purpose one needs.

After trying to manipulate various dates using MySQL (YYYY-MM-DD), standard US date format (MM/DD/YYYY) and php strtotime (DD/MM/YYYY) - each in a different string format - I thought that the "object" form might be a bit more "standard" and flexible.

So as a proof of concept I wrote a simple frontend and backend in which the front end passes a "date" to the servers as a millisecond value, the server sends it back, and it is parsed in any way necessary by the front end.

Here is the code:

CSS

.divtest {
  width:500px;
  margin:0px auto;
  text-align:center;
  background-color:#C1C1FD;
  padding:2em;
  border: 10px solid #FCD1E3;}
.span1 {
  color:black;}
.div1 {
  color:red;
  background-color:#C6CDFD;}

HTML

<body>
<div style="width:500px; margin:0px auto; text-align:center;">
<div id = "test1" class="div1"><span class="span1">Date:</span></div>
<div id = "test2" class="div1"><span class="span1">Object:</span></div>
<div id = "test3" class="div1"><span class="span1">Returned Object:</span></div>
<div id = "test4" class="div1"><span class="span1">Returned Date/Time:</span></div>
<div id = "test5" class="div1"><span class="span1">Returned Year:</span></div>
<div id = "test6" class="div1"><span class="span1">Returned Month:</span></div>
<div id = "test7" class="div1"><span class="span1">Returned Day:</span></div>
<div id = "test8" class="div1"><span class="span1">Returned Hours:</span></div>
<div id = "test9" class="div1"><span class="span1">Returned Minutes:</span></div>
</div>

Javascipt

$(document).ready(function(e) {

var testdate = "12-12-2013";
var testobject = Date.parse("12/12/2013 11:22:33");

$('#test1').append(testdate);
$('#test2').append(testobject);

$.ajax({
        type: "POST",
         url: "timedatewritereadbackend.php",
        data: {testobject: testobject},
    dataType: 'json'
        })
          .done( function(result) {
                                   $('#test3').append(result.datetimeobject);
                                   var milliseconds = result.datetimeobject;
                                   var settime = new Date( milliseconds * 1 );//1386876153000
                                   $('#test4').append(settime.toString());
                                   $('#test5').append(settime.getFullYear());
                                   $('#test6').append(settime.getMonth());
                                   $('#test7').append(settime.getDate());
                                   $('#test8').append(settime.getHours());
                                   $('#test9').append(settime.getMinutes());
                                   console.log("Object: " + result.datetimeobject + "--" + "Var milli: " + milliseconds + "--" + "Var settime: " + settime);
                                     })
            .fail(function(jqXHR, textStatus, errorThrown){ console.log(jqXHR.responseText, textStatus, errorThrown);
                                                           $('#returnedobject').append("Fail");
                                                           })
            .always(function(data, textStatus, jqXHR){
                                                      console.log(data, textStatus, jqXHR);
                                                     });                                                           

});//End of ready

PHP

$testobject  = $_POST['testobject'];
$localid = '138';

$host     = XXXXX;
$user     = XXXXX;
$password = XXXXX;
$dbname   = XXXXX;

$cxn = mysqli_connect($host,$user,$password,$dbname);
if (mysqli_connect_errno()) {echo "No connection" . mysqli_connect_error();}

$query = " UPDATE testtable
           SET datetimeobject = '$testobject'
           WHERE localid = $localid " ;
$result = mysqli_query($cxn, $query) or die ("could not query database 1");

$query = " SELECT datetimeobject
           FROM testtable
           WHERE localid = $localid " ;
$result = mysqli_query($cxn, $query) or die ("could not connect");

$row = mysqli_fetch_array($result);
$variablestopass = array
    (
          'datetimeobject' => $row['datetimeobject']
   );
echo json_encode($variablestopass);

This seems to work nicely as a "proof of concept" - always store a date/datetime as an object (varchar), then pull the object out and reformat it any way you want.

My questions to you are:

  1. Do the experts use this technique at all? (not having to manipulate date/time strings but only objects)

  2. Are there pros and cons that I might be missing in this idea?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
I didn't quite understand... but storing dates (or whatever well-defined stuff) as varchars is a big no-no.. –  georg Nov 7 '13 at 0:34
    
You can store dates in MySQL like YYYY/MM/DD or YYYY/MM/DD HH:MM:SS, you must manipulate dates for US format MM/DD/YYYY, English format DD/MM/YYYY, change a date for strtotime (English format). But if you store a "date" in ms format - 1383311740813 for 11/1/13 6:15:40 - you only have to manipulate a format from a "universal format" to whatever format you want. –  TimSPQR Nov 7 '13 at 0:43

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