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Here's my code for a function that change the case of the character. For example"ABC" would be turn to "abc" and vice versa.

char *flipCase(const char *src){

char *output;
output = malloc(sizeof(src));
//Copy source to output
strcpy(output,src);
int i = 0;
//Check if the case is lower or upper
while(output[i] != '\0')
{
    //Check if it's alphabetic
    if (isalpha(output[i]))
    {
        //if it's upper case
        if (isupper(output[i]))
        {
            //Convert to lower case and increment i
            output[i]= tolower(output[i]);
            i++;
        }
        //if it's lower case
        if (islower(output[i]))
        {
            //Convert to upper and increment i
            output[i]=toupper(output[i]);
            i++;
        }

    }
    //Else, skip it
    else 
    {
        i++;
    }

}
return output;}

For most of the time, it seems to be fine to me. However when it is tested it with "Hello World, How are you?". I expected "hELLO wORLD, hOW ARE YOU?" but my program gives "hELLO wORLD, hOW ARE YOU1" Notice the "1" at the very end instead of "?". What's causing the problem? How can I fix it?

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1  
Use a debugger. Step through it line by line. Nothing obvious sticks out to me... but maybe I'm missing it. – nhgrif Nov 7 '13 at 0:27
4  
Do you know what sizeof(src) means? – Kerrek SB Nov 7 '13 at 0:28
2  
i++ : please learn about for() loops. – wildplasser Nov 7 '13 at 0:31
    
is '?' alphabetic? ... nope you are getting what was left where you improperly malloc'd – technosaurus Nov 7 '13 at 0:39
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You have two problems in your code.

First - as was pointed out by others, you are not allocating the right amount of memory for the return string. sizeof(src) is whatever size a pointer is in your platform (probably 8 bytes). You need

output = malloc(strlen(src) + 1);

Note that you will have to free the memory so allocated at some point (after you are finished using the result), or you will get a memory leak (creating new blocks of memory every time the function is called).

The second problem is in your while loop. Although you correctly test for the end of the input string, you are actually incrementing i inside the loop, then looking at the next character. That next character is not tested by isalpha - if you think that is important (probably not, I think toupper and tolower should be smart enough) then you should not do that. Adding an else will clean this up:

if(isalpha(output[i])) {
    if (isupper(output[i]))
    {
        //Convert to lower case and increment i
        output[i]= tolower(output[i]);
        i++;
    }
    //if it's lower case
    else {
        if (islower(output[i]))
        {
            //Convert to upper and increment i
            output[i]=toupper(output[i]);
            i++;
        }
    }
}

As a general rule, if you use strncpy instead of strcpy you will avoid "copying more than you are allowed" (as long as you use the parameter n correctly: "the space I allocated for the copy"). In your case you allocated sizeof(src), and if you had done

strncpy(output, src, sizeof(src));

the problem would have been more obvious.

Defensive coding (writing the extra few characters that will catch "trouble") is well worth it in the long run...

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1  
Thanks, I learnt quite a lot :) – Nguyễn Duy Nov 7 '13 at 7:40

The buffer allocation is incorrect, causing a buffer overflow:

output = malloc(sizeof(src));

sizeof always returns a constant (unless applied to a VLA) so it doesn't get you the length of a string. What you want is strlen( src ) + 1.

The other answers about loop factoring have a point at the abstract level, but your loop does not appear to be incorrect. It always goes to the next character, it never checks the same character twice, and it never goes off the end of the buffer (supposing the buffer is valid in the first place). The control flow is just a little odd.

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Oh wow, you're correct. His code is valid in that regard, just so unusual I assumed it was the mistake. This is right. +1 – BlackVegetable Nov 7 '13 at 0:45

I think your problem is you have a case falling through to another case:

// Case IS_UPPER
// Some code
// i++;

// Case IS_LOWER (is reached by the same iteration but i is one higher!
// Some code
// i++;

Thus, you seemed to have a logic bug where some values of i are only reaching half of your logic block(s). Using else if could fix this. However, your control flow (being a while loop) will continue to iterate without incrementing i until it is correct to do so. While this is definitely something to refactor, it isn't your bug here.

Note: One way to refactor this code to be cleaner would be by using a for loop to avoid having to write i++ over and over again.

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toupper and tolower never modify punctuation anyway. – Potatoswatter Nov 7 '13 at 0:39
    
Ah, that I did not know. I figured there was some funny corner case there. It is probably a malloc issue then. – BlackVegetable Nov 7 '13 at 0:40

The bug is caused by double increment of the loop variable.

Suppose that output[i] is upper case, and output[i+1] is lower case. Then the following part of the loop executes and increments i:

    if (isupper(output[i]))
    {
        //Convert to lower case and increment i
        output[i]= tolower(output[i]);
        i++;
    }

And now, because i is now already have been incremented and has the value of the "original" i, the following part of the loop executes as well, causing double increment of i:

    if (islower(output[i]))
    {
        //Convert to upper and increment i
        output[i]=toupper(output[i]);
        i++;
    }

Bugs like these is one of the major reasons why "for" loop are generally preferred to "while" loops whenever an index variable or iterator variable is available. Use "while" loops only if the control of the looping condition is beyond the local code control, such as reading a file or a socket; for everything else use "for" loops.

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But this is not really a problem... since he is looking at the next character. It is unorthodox (and every other character is not tested for isalpha) but in fact no increment occurs if the test fails. Your advice about preferring for over while is absolutely valid, though. "Since you know how long the string is, use that knowledge". – Floris Nov 7 '13 at 2:03
    
@Floris: this is exactly the problem. The test if(isalpha(output[i])) applies to the value of i in the beginning of the loop; after i gets incremented inside the loop output[i] can be absolutely anything. For example, on the iteration when i was 23 output[i] was 'U', so i was incremented to 24 and output[i] was now '?', but you are still inside the body of if(isalpha(output[i])) statement, which was checked when i was 23, doing things to output[24] under the assumption that it's an alpha. Bottom line: don't increment loop counter in more than one place; prefer "for" loop to "while". – Michael Nov 7 '13 at 17:06
    
I agree with you, but the isalpha outer condition is actually irrelevant as tolower and toupper will only do something if their argument is an alpha. Dangerous code structure, but not the thing that caused issues in this instance. – Floris Nov 7 '13 at 18:43

Most importantly malloc size was wrong (yours would always malloc the size of a pointer) Secondly, the logic is messed up WRT lower and upper, your output would miss 2 subsequent capitals amongst others. And less importantly, there is no reason to copy data then manipulate it when you can copy in the data as you go.

char *flipCase(const char *src){
char *output=malloc(strlen( src ) + 1);
int i;

for(i=0; *src; src++,i++){
    if (isupper(*src)){
        output[i]=tolower(*src);
    }else if (islower(*src)){
        output[i]=toupper(*src);
    }else{
        output[i]=*src;
    }
}
return output;
}
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