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I have a program being called by the arguments:

 pipeline -f outfile2 < infile > outfile1

It is supposed to mimick the functionality of the bash script:

 (rev | sort | uniq -c | tee outfile2| wc) < infile > outfile1

I understand how to get the piping set up, but I do not understand how to get the initial read. I've captured the outfile2 filename to a variable, but I think I can keep the outer two and the operating system will pick them up as stdin and stdout respectively. How would I programatically read the stdin into a pipe in my parent process?

UPDATE follows: The following code does nothing to modify the output files with the command line argument: pipeline -f outfile2 outfile1
obviously with real file names.

main:

char *fp;
int c;

/* parse command line arguments */
parse_argv(argc, argv);

if (pipe(pipeOne) == -1){ /* Create the pipe */
    perror("pipe one");
    error(-1);
}


if (pipeOne[1] != 1){
    dup2(pipeOne[1], stdout);
    exit(-1);
}

while ((c = getc(stdin)) != EOF){
      if ((write(pipeOne[1], c, 1)) < 1)
      {
          perror("Write to pipe failed.");
          exit(-1);
     }
 }

wc_child();
/* begin reading file to pipe */
if (close(pipeOne[0]) == -1){ /* Close unused read end */
    perror("closing pipes");
    exit(-1);
}
 close (pipeOne[1]);

wc_child:

void wc_child(){
int numread;
switch (fork()) { /* Create a child process */
    case -1:
        perror("fork for rev_child");
    case 0: /* Child */
        /*if (close(pipeOne[1]) == -1) /* Close unused write end */
        /*perror("closing pipes");*/
        if (close(pipeOne[1]) == -1){ /* Close unused write end */
            perror("closing pipes");
            exit(-1);
            }
        dup2(pipeOne[0], stdin);
        /* dup2(pipeFive[0], stdin);*/
        /* Not sure how to set up stdout since it will be going to a file.*/

        for(;;){
            execlp("wc","wc");
        }

        break;
    default: /* Parent */
        return 0;
}
return -1; /*return -1 because it never should reach this code.  If it does that indicates a problem*/
}
share|improve this question
    
Just a note about reading from piped stdin: Should the sending end of the pipe send a \0, you will read a \0. This is uncommon, but can happen. Should one arrive, it may arrive in the middle of a fgets(...) buffer or in the middle of a scanf("%[^n]", ...) buffer. BTW: I like your getc() method. –  chux Nov 7 '13 at 3:05
    
You could look at C Minishell — adding pipelines. Except for changing the commands and needing to plug an argument into the tee command (which is easy), you can pretty much copy the answer from there and get the job done. You don't need to fix standard input for the rev process; you also don't need to fix standard output for the wc process. (The command is equivalent to rev < infile1 | sort | uniq -c | tee outfile2 | wc > outfile1. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 7 '13 at 4:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could #include <unistd.h> and then read straight from the file descriptor STDIN_FILENO. dup2(pipeOne[0], stdin); should probably also use STDIN_FILENO, as stdin is a FILE * and not a descriptor.

I don't think you really want to do any of that, though. Instead of reading from stdin, you should be hooking stdout up to the write end of a pipe (and the next stage of the pipeline to the read end) and then execing to begin the first stage of your pipeline. The invoked subprocess will then read from stdin, transform the input and write to stdout, filling the pipe with data.

share|improve this answer

There are quite a lot of different ways you could do it; it is probably sufficient to use fgets() to read the data, and then write() carefully to write to the pipe:

char line[4096];
while (fgets(line, sizeof(line), stdin) != 0)
{
    size_t len = strlen(line);
    if (write(pipefd[1], line, len) != len)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Failed to write to pipe\n");
        exit(1);
    }
}

To simulate the pipeline, you really don't need to copy anything from standard input to a pipe; you can simply let rev read standard input.

Here is code swiftly derived from my answer to C Minishell — Adding Pipelines that does what you need.

/*
** How to write from stdin to a pipe in C
** http://stackoverflow.com/questions/19826211
**
** Write program pipeline to be invoked as:
**
**     pipeline -f outfile2 < infile > outfile1
**
** It should mimic the functionality of the bash script:
**
**     (rev | sort | uniq -c | tee outfile2 | wc) < infile > outfile1
**
** Refactored, with equivalent functionality:
**
**     rev < infile | sort | uniq -c | tee outfile2 | wc > outfile1
**
** Based on answer to SO 13636252 C Minishell adding pipelines
*/

/* pipeline.c */
#include <assert.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <stdarg.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/wait.h>
#include <unistd.h>

/*  who | awk '{print $1}' | sort | uniq -c | sort -n */
static char *cmd0[] = { "rev",        0 };
static char *cmd1[] = { "sort",       0 };
static char *cmd2[] = { "uniq", "-c", 0 };
static char *cmd3[] = { "tee", 0,     0 };
static char *cmd4[] = { "wc",         0 };

static char **cmds[] = { cmd0, cmd1, cmd2, cmd3, cmd4 };
static int   ncmds = sizeof(cmds) / sizeof(cmds[0]);

static char const usestr[] = "[-f filename]";

typedef int Pipe[2];

/* These functions normally declared in stderr.h */
static void err_setarg0(const char *argv0);
static void err_sysexit(char const *fmt, ...);
static void err_syswarn(char const *fmt, ...);
static void err_usage(char const *usestr);

/* exec_nth_command() and exec_pipe_command() are mutually recursive */
static void exec_pipe_command(int ncmds, char ***cmds, Pipe output);

/* With the standard output plumbing sorted, execute Nth command */
static void exec_nth_command(int ncmds, char ***cmds)
{
    assert(ncmds >= 1);
    if (ncmds > 1)
    {
        pid_t pid;
        Pipe input;
        if (pipe(input) != 0)
            err_sysexit("Failed to create pipe");
        if ((pid = fork()) < 0)
            err_sysexit("Failed to fork");
        if (pid == 0)
        {
            /* Child */
            exec_pipe_command(ncmds-1, cmds, input);
        }
        /* Fix standard input to read end of pipe */
        dup2(input[0], 0);
        close(input[0]);
        close(input[1]);
    }
    execvp(cmds[ncmds-1][0], cmds[ncmds-1]);
    err_sysexit("Failed to exec %s", cmds[ncmds-1][0]);
    /*NOTREACHED*/
}

/* Given pipe, plumb it to standard output, then execute Nth command */
static void exec_pipe_command(int ncmds, char ***cmds, Pipe output)
{
    assert(ncmds >= 1);
    /* Fix stdout to write end of pipe */
    dup2(output[1], 1);
    close(output[0]);
    close(output[1]);
    exec_nth_command(ncmds, cmds);
}

/* Execute the N commands in the pipeline */
static void exec_pipeline(int ncmds, char ***cmds)
{
    assert(ncmds >= 1);
    pid_t pid;
    if ((pid = fork()) < 0)
        err_syswarn("Failed to fork");
    if (pid != 0)
        return;
    exec_nth_command(ncmds, cmds);
}

/* Collect dead children until there are none left */
static void corpse_collector(void)
{
    pid_t parent = getpid();
    pid_t corpse;
    int   status;
    while ((corpse = waitpid(-1, &status, 0)) != -1)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "%d: child %d status 0x%.4X\n",
                (int)parent, (int)corpse, status);
    }
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int opt;
    char *filename = "outfile2";    // Default file name

    err_setarg0(argv[0]);

    while ((opt = getopt(argc, argv, "f:")) != -1)
    {
        switch (opt)
        {
        case 'f':
            filename = optarg;
            break;
        default:
            err_usage(usestr);
            break;
        }
    }
    if (optind != argc)
        err_usage(usestr);

    /* Set the file name for tee to write to */
    cmd3[1] = filename;

    exec_pipeline(ncmds, cmds);
    corpse_collector();
    return(0);
}

/* Normally in stderr.c */
static const char *arg0 = "<undefined>";

static void err_setarg0(const char *argv0)
{
    arg0 = argv0;
}

static void err_usage(char const *usestr)
{
    fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s %s\n", arg0, usestr);
    exit(1);
}

static void err_vsyswarn(char const *fmt, va_list args)
{
    int errnum = errno;
    fprintf(stderr, "%s:%d: ", arg0, (int)getpid());
    vfprintf(stderr, fmt, args);
    if (errnum != 0)
        fprintf(stderr, " (%d: %s)", errnum, strerror(errnum));
    putc('\n', stderr);
}

static void err_syswarn(char const *fmt, ...)
{
    va_list args;
    va_start(args, fmt);
    err_vsyswarn(fmt, args);
    va_end(args);
}

static void err_sysexit(char const *fmt, ...)
{
    va_list args;
    va_start(args, fmt);
    err_vsyswarn(fmt, args);
    va_end(args);
    exit(1);
}

Example output (outfile1 when infile is a copy of the program's source code):

 125     691    4879

Example output (first and last 10 lines of outfile2):

  22 
   1 )... ,tmf* tsnoc rahc(nrawsys_rre diov citats
   1 )... ,tmf* tsnoc rahc(tixesys_rre diov citats
   1 )0 < ))(krof = dip(( fi    
   1 )0 < ))(krof = dip(( fi        
   1 )0 =! )tupni(epip( fi        
   1 )0 =! dip( fi    
   1 )0 =! munrre( fi    
   1 )0 == dip( fi        
   1 )0vgra* rahc tsnoc(0grates_rre diov citats
...
   1 >h.tressa< edulcni#
   1 C ni epip a ot nidts morf etirw ot woH **
   1 eman elif tluafeD //    ;"2eliftuo" = emanelif* rahc    
   1 senilepip gnidda llehsiniM C 25263631 OS ot rewsna no desaB **
  10 {
   3 {    
   2 {        
  10 }
   3 }    
   2 }  

(I note that the word count is the same whether the lines are reversed or not, so the rev command serves no purpose in the pipeline.) There is some diagnostic output that gets caught; you can easily suppress it.

share|improve this answer
    
updated above with code. I have something similar to this (but each character) and it doesn't work –  Marshall Tigerus Nov 7 '13 at 2:31

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