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I am creating a concentration game.

I have an buffered image array where I load in a 25 image sprite sheet.

public static BufferedImage[] card = new BufferedImage[25];

0 index being the card back. and 1 - 24 being the values for the face of the cards to check against if the cards match.

What I am tying to do is this I will have 4 difficulties Easy, Normal, Hard, and Extreme. Each difficulty will have a certain amount of cards it will need to draw and then double the ones it chosen. for example the default level will be NORMAL which is 12 matches so it need to randomly choose 12 unique cards from the Buffered Image array and then double each value so it will only have 2 of each cards and then shuffle the results.

This is what I got so far but it always seems to have duplicates about 99% of the time.

//generate cards
                    Random r = new Random();

                    int j = 0;


                    int[] rowOne = new int[12];
                    int[] rowTwo = new int[12];
                    boolean[] rowOneBool = new boolean[12];

                    for(int i = 0; i < rowOneBool.length; i++)
                        rowOneBool[i] = false;


                    for(int i = 0; i < rowOne.length; i++){
                        int typeId = r.nextInt(12)+1;
                        while(rowOneBool[typeId]){
                            typeId = r.nextInt(12)+1;
                            if(rowOneBool[typeId] == false);
                        }

                        rowOne[i] = typeId;
                        j=0;
                    }

A sample run of my program

the 3 amounts I will be needing to generate is Easy 6, Normal 12, and Hard 18 extreme will use all of the images except index 0 which is the back of the cards.

share|improve this question
    
If you have a finite amount of images, it'd be pretty easy to create an array of boolean of this size. Generate a random number, if that index is false, set it true, and add that image. If it's true, generate a replacement random number, and continue until you've set 6/12/18 to true. – nhgrif Nov 7 '13 at 3:39
    
what I would do is pick a random index, get the number, and change it to a 0. then the next iteration, if you get a 0, pick a different index. – Jeeter Nov 7 '13 at 3:40
1  
Put them in in a List, shuffle it, pare the list down to your difficulties list size, use addAll to add the new list to itself, shuffle again. – Tonithy Nov 7 '13 at 3:43
up vote 0 down vote accepted

From what I understand from your question, the answer should look something like this: Have 2 classes, one called Randp and the other called Main. Run Main, and edit the code to suit your needs.

package randp;


public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Randp randp = new Randp(10);
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            System.out.print(randp.nextInt());
        }
    } 

}


package randp;

public class Randp {

private int numsLeft;
private int MAX_VALUE;
int[] chooser;

public Randp(int startCounter) {
    MAX_VALUE = startCounter; //set the amount we go up to
    numsLeft = startCounter;
    chooser = new int[MAX_VALUE];
    for (int i = 1; i <= chooser.length; i++) {
        chooser[i-1] = i; //fill the array up

    }
}

public int nextInt() {
    if(numsLeft == 0){
        return 0; //nothing left in the array
    }
    int a = chooser[(int)(Math.random() * MAX_VALUE)]; //picking a random index
    if(a == 0) {
        return this.nextInt(); //we hit an index that's been used already, pick another one!
    }
    chooser[a-1] = 0; //don't want to use it again
    numsLeft--; //keep track of the numbers
    return a;

}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jeeter, and everyone else I made a new project and put the above code in it to see how it ran and work I will try to integrate it into my project. – Phantom Coder Nov 7 '13 at 4:05
    
No problem. You just need to add it as a separate class, and then use different Randp objects depending on the levels: Easy would be new Randp(6), Normal is new Randp(12), and so on. Then instead of your r.nextInt() you have, call the Randp's nextInt(). – Jeeter Nov 7 '13 at 4:08
    
I have a variable called cardsToDraw. so I did the following Randp randp = new Randp(GameConstants.cardsToDraw); the number is being set when they select the play button. but when I go to put it in the card object I need to somehow get the values of Randp as an int in this statement handler.addcard(new GameCard(i*90, (GameConstants.CENTER_Y - offsetY), rowOne[i], res)) in the place of rowOne[i] – Phantom Coder Nov 7 '13 at 4:39
    
OK i have it to working Thanks I just changed the rowOne[1] to cards[i] because we are calculating it differently and that word just did not fit I just did this cards[i] = randp.nextInt(); - and changed the other code to look like this handler.addcard(new GameCard(i*90, (GameConstants.CENTER_Y - offsetY), cards[i], res)); – Phantom Coder Nov 7 '13 at 4:50
    
Great! Would you like to accept the answer? – Jeeter Nov 7 '13 at 5:02

This is more or less in the nature of random numbers. Sometimes they are duplicates. You can easily factor that in though if you want them to be more unique. Just discard the number and generate again if it's not unique.

Here's a simple method to generate unique random numbers with a specified allowance of duplicates:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int[] randoms = uniqueRandoms(new int[16], 1, 25, 3);
    for (int r : randoms) System.out.println(r);
}

public static int[] uniqueRandoms(int[] randoms, int lo, int hi, int allowance) {
    // should do some error checking up here

    int range = hi - lo, duplicates = 0;
    Random gen = new Random();

    for (int i = 0, k; i < randoms.length; i++) {
        randoms[i] = gen.nextInt(range) + lo;

        for (k = 0; k < i; k++) {
            if (randoms[i] == randoms[k]) {
                if (duplicates < allowance) {
                    duplicates++;
                } else {
                    i--;
                }
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    return randoms;
}

Edit: Tested and corrected. Now it works. : )

share|improve this answer

This is how I would handle it. You would move your BufferedImage objects to a List, although I would consider creating an object for the 'cards' you're using...

int removalAmount = 3; //Remove 3 cards at random... Use a switch to change this based upon difficulty or whatever...
List<BufferedImage> list = new ArrayList<BufferedImage>();
list.addAll(Arrays.asList(card)); // Add the cards to the list, from your array.
Collections.shuffle(list);

for (int i = 0; i < removalAmount; i++) {
    list.remove(list.size() - 1);
}

list.addAll(list);
Collections.shuffle(list);

for (BufferedImage specificCard : list) {
    //Do something
}
share|improve this answer

Ok, I said I'd give you something better, and I will. First, let's improve Jeeter's solution.

  1. It has a bug. Because it relies on 0 to be the "used" indicator, it won't actually produce index 0 until the end, which is not random.
  2. It fills an array with indices, then uses 0 as effectively a boolean value, which is redundant. If a value at an index is not 0 we already know what it is, it's the same as the index we used to get to it. It just hides the true nature of algorithm and makes it unnecessarily complex.
  3. It uses recursion when it doesn't need to. Sure, you can argue that this improves code clarity, but then you risk running into a StackOverflowException for too many recursive calls.

Thus, I present an improved version of the algorithm:

class Randp {
    private int MAX_VALUE;
    private int numsLeft;
    private boolean[] used;

    public Randp(int startCounter) {
        MAX_VALUE = startCounter; 
        numsLeft = startCounter;

        // All false by default. 
        used = new boolean[MAX_VALUE]; 
    }

    public int nextInt() {
        if (numsLeft <= 0)
            return 0;
        numsLeft--;

        int index;
        do
        {
            index = (int)(Math.random() * MAX_VALUE);
        } while (used[index]);

        return index;
    }
}

I believe this is much easier to understand, but now it becomes clear the algorithm is not great. It might take a long time to find an unused index, especially when we wanted a lot of values and there's only a few left. We need to fundamentally change the way we approach this. It'd be better to generate the values randomly from the beginning:

class Randp {
    private ArrayList<Integer> chooser = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    private int count = 0;

    public Randp(int startCounter) {
        for (int i = 0; i < startCounter; i++)
            chooser.add(i);
        Collections.shuffle(chooser);
    }

    public int nextInt() {
        if (count >= chooser.size())
            return 0;
        return chooser.get(count++);
    }
}

This is the most efficient and extremely simple since we made use of existing classes and methods.

share|improve this answer

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