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Most of the examples I come across show how to fork, like this one:

main()
{
    int    pid;

    pid = fork();
    // child
    if (pid == 0)                
    {
        ...
    }
    // Parent
    else if (pID > 0)            
    {
        ...
    }

}

Some show how to fork 2 children, like so

pid = fork();
// Child
if ( pid==0 )
{
   ...
}

// Parent
else if ( pid>0 )
{
   pid=fork();

   // Second child
   if ( pid==0 ){
      ...
   }

}

And here is my attempt to fork 5 children...

pid = fork();
// Child
if ( pid==0 )
{
   ...
}

// Parent
else if ( pid>0 )
{
   pid=fork();

   // Second child
   if ( pid==0 ){
      ...
   }

   // Parent
   else if ( pid>0 )
   {
      pid=fork();

      // Third child
      if ( pid==0 ){
         ...
      }
      // Parent
      else if ( pid>0 )
      {
         pid=fork();

         // Fourth child
         if ( pid==0 ){
            ...
         }
         // Parent
         else if ( pid>0 )
         {
            pid=fork();

            // Fifth child
            if ( pid==0 ){
               ...
            }
         }
      }
   }
}

Question:

My point is that this is insanity. Is there a cleaner way to loop through and create a varying number of children (ie. specified via a command line argument)?

NOTE: It is vitally important that the children distinguish themselves apart (ie. write "hi, I am child number 6"...) as my job involves each process signalling a different computer. Currently I am doing so using semaphores and an array of target computers. What I would rather want is increasing indeces 1..N for the processes.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use a for loop. Each process will get it's own copy of the loop variable.

int pid;
int numKids = 5;
int procNum;

for(procNum = 0; i < numKids; procNum++) {
    // Note: haven't included error handling...
    pid = fork();
    if (pid == 0) {
        break;
    }
}

if (pid == 0) {
    // child specific stuff. procNum is set to the "child number"
}
else {
    // parent stuff
}
share|improve this answer
    
For whatever reason, I assumed the variables for the for loop would get reset –  puk Nov 7 '13 at 4:15
1  
Nope, each child will get it's own copy so you need to make sure the children break the loop otherwise you'll end up with each child spawning more children and resetting pid so they act as a parent... –  John3136 Nov 7 '13 at 4:19

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