Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm trying to create a class which will contain a map of type_index keys mapped to pointers of each type passed as a template argument. This would allow me to specify a series of types my class will rely on in it's declaration.

I've done a bit of research but can only seem to find ways to unpack arguments, rather than types. I'm new to this subject, and would appreciate any clarification on terminology, or references to relevant text.

template <typename T>
T* SomeFakeFactoryGetter() { return new T(); }

template <class... Injected>
class UtilityProvider
{
public:
    template <class U>
    U* GetUtility()
    {
        std::type_index idx = std::type_index(typeid(U));
        assert(_injectedClasses.find(idx) != _injectedClasses.end());
        return reinterpret_cast<U*>(_injectedClasses[idx]);
    }

    // **
    // How would I *unpack* all types for use as indices into my map?
    // ( I realise this function is not what I want.)
    template <Injected... C>
    void Unpack()
    {
        _injectedClasses[std::type_index(typeid(C))] = SomeFakeFactoryGetter<C>();
    }

private:
    typedef std::unordered_map<std::type_index, void*> InjectedMap;
    InjectedMap _injectedClasses;
};

class Bar{ public: void A() { printf("Hello bar"); } };
class Baz{ public: void B() { printf("Hello baz"); } };
class Nope {};

class Foo : public UtilityProvider<Bar, Baz>
{
public:
    Foo()
    {
        GetUtility<Bar>()->A();
        GetUtility<Nope>(); // Fail. User must specify which utilities this class     will use.
    }
};
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

What I've done in this situation is to create a dummy function to expand these expressions into, but it looks quite hideous:

    template <int ... Dummies>
    void dummy(int&& ...){}

    template <class ... C>
    void Unpack()
    {
       dummy(((_injectedClasses[std::type_index(typeid(C))] = 
                 SomeFakeFactoryGetter<C>()), 0)...);
    }

Note that in your case I think you'll be better off with using insert with an initializer_list:

    template <class ... C>
    void Unpack()
    {
      _injectedClasses.insert({std::make_pair(std::type_index(typeid(C)),
                                              SomeFakeFactoryGetter<C>())...});
    }

I couldn't find a direct mention of this but I believe there is an important difference between the two methods, in case you didn't already know. insert will not override existing key-value pairs, whereas operator[] will. This can affect which method you should use if if this is important to you.

share|improve this answer
    
That works awesome - thanks for the heads up on the initializer lists solution. – Aesthete Nov 7 '13 at 5:24

An alternative approach:

template <typename ... C> struct Unpacker;

template <typename Tail, typename ... Queue>
struct Unpacker<Tail, Queue...>
{
    void operator () (InjectedMap& injectedClasses) const
    {
        _injectedClasses[std::type_index(typeid(Tail))] = SomeFakeFactoryGetter<Tail>();
        Unpacker<Queue...>()(injectedClasses);
    }
};

template <>
struct Unpacker<>
{
    void operator () (InjectedMap& injectedClasses) const {}
};
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.