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I'm new to Java. I am trying to create a multiplication table with 12 on each side of the table, so 12 going to the right and 12 going down. On each line, we will see the two values multiple. So my plan is to use 12 very similar for statements to print each of the twelve lines. One value will increment within a loop. The issue is, the first line isn't increment my y value. So it just prints out spaced out 1s.

If you have any suggestions on my latter part of the assignment, it'd be helpful. Once I get the first line to print 12 digits, I can make 11 other for statements. But I feel like there may be a simpler way to get the rest of the statements.

public class Sixthree
{
    public static void main (String[] args) 
  {
        int x = 1;
        int y = 1;

        System.out.print("   ");

        for ( int c= x*y; y<= 12; y++)
        {
            System.out.print(c + "  ");
        }
   }
}

I want the out put to look like this to start off with.:

 1  2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

But the current output looks like this:

 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

But I want it to eventually like this: http://math.about.com/blgrid.htm But without the blue lines.

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2  
You should use two nested loops. –  Bahman M. Nov 7 '13 at 4:46
    
What is your excepted out put? –  Ruchira Gayan Ranaweera Nov 7 '13 at 4:48
    
I'm not sure why you think it is messy. It's spaced out. You can tell by the indentations where the brackets are matching up. What is your suggestion? Also, no one is paying for something so simple. This is for school. –  munchschair Nov 7 '13 at 4:53
    
I wouldn't call this crappy compared to some of the code that is posted on here. The spacing in your loop declaration is inconsistent and so is your bracing style (the brace after the class declaration is on the next line where all the others are on the same line) but that's it. And for all we know those are just copy and paste errors. –  Radiodef Nov 7 '13 at 5:44
    
It definitely is a copy paste issue, the code on my editor doesn't look like that. I'll have to keep this in mind when I copy paste my code elsewhere. –  munchschair Nov 7 '13 at 13:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted
for (int i = 1; i <= 12; i++) {
    for (int j = 1; j <= 12; j++){      
        System.out.printf ("%3d ", j * i);
    }
    System.out.print ("\n");
}

The above code will give you output similar to what is shown below:

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10  11  12
  2   4   6   8  10  12  14  16  18  20  22  24
  3   6   9  12  15  18  21  24  27  30  33  36
  4   8  12  16  20  24  28  32  36  40  44  48
  5  10  15  20  25  30  35  40  45  50  55  60
  6  12  18  24  30  36  42  48  54  60  66  72
  7  14  21  28  35  42  49  56  63  70  77  84
  8  16  24  32  40  48  56  64  72  80  88  96
  9  18  27  36  45  54  63  72  81  90  99 108
 10  20  30  40  50  60  70  80  90 100 110 120
 11  22  33  44  55  66  77  88  99 110 121 132
 12  24  36  48  60  72  84  96 108 120 132 144
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I see you used System.out.printf ("%3d ". It evens out the spacing. Why? –  munchschair Nov 7 '13 at 5:42
    
This is a format specifier, it outputs the integer using a width of at least 3 (%3D). If the digits is <3, spaces will be added before the number. In the case of the int 99, you can think of the spaces as an imaginary zero (099) removing that leading zero will right align it with 100 below it (the output is right justified by default). same thing for 1 (001). –  m8L Nov 7 '13 at 13:23
    
I looked it up. In the book I'm using it says that printf is avoided because: "is not a particularly clean object-oriented solution to the problem of formatting output" –  munchschair Nov 7 '13 at 13:35

You are getting all 1s because the loop initialization statement int c= x*y will be executed only once for a for loop. That is it is executed the first time when x=1 and y=1 and since, it is given as the loop initialisation statement and not in the loop body, it is never reevaluated. The for loop works as :

The loop initialisation statement is executed only once at the beginning of the loop. After each iteration the loop update expression is executed and the loop condition is reevaluated. for(loop_initialisation;loop_condition;loop_update) { ... }

So you should update c inside the loop, something like :

for ( int c= x*y; y<= 12; y++)
{
    c = x*y;
    System.out.print(c + "  ");

}
share|improve this answer
    
I thought for loops keep repeating till the condition is no longer fulfilled? –  munchschair Nov 7 '13 at 4:57
    
The loop initialisation statement is executed only once at the beginning of the loop. After each iteration the loop update expression is executed and the loop condition is reevaluated. for(loop_initialisation;loop_condition;loop_update) { ... } –  jester Nov 7 '13 at 4:58
    
the for has this structure: for(initial statement, run once; condition, always evaluate; increment, always run); –  iajrz Nov 7 '13 at 4:59
    
Also if you are assigning c inside the loop like jester has shown you don't need to initialize it at the beginning of the loop. for (int c; y <= 12; y++) { c = x * y; } works and doesn't do the redundant assignment. –  Radiodef Nov 7 '13 at 5:39

You should be using two nested for loops, one to iterate over the values of x, another to iterate over the values of y with each inner loop printing the value of x * y and each outer loop printing a new line character for formatting.

// Pseudo-code //
for(each x) {
    for(each y) {
        print(product);
    }
    print(newline);
}
share|improve this answer
    
So the outer loop should increment x and the inner loop should increment y? –  munchschair Nov 7 '13 at 5:15
    
That is correct. Each for loop is delegated the task of incrementing a single variable, either x or y. The inner most code executes after every increment of y, so that is where we must print our product. –  Taylor Hx Nov 7 '13 at 5:19
    
I did that, but I am only getting the first line printed followed by many new lines. –  munchschair Nov 7 '13 at 5:23
    
That says to me that perhaps your for(each y) line is faulty. Can you post that line here? –  Taylor Hx Nov 7 '13 at 5:26
    
Actually I got it to run and print the correct numbers. Now a table comes out, but the spacing is somewhat erratic. The double digits throw off the line. It's because they require another digit. I'm sure I can get it right with some minor tweaking. –  munchschair Nov 7 '13 at 5:39

Why it just prints out spaced out 1s ?

It is because you just assign c only once in for-loop. for ( int c= x*y; y<= 12; y++)

When value y is incvreasing, value c is not changing. The values is 1*1=1 (x=1, y=1).

As a result, you see it just prints out spaced out 1s.

You can use nested for loop to implement it.

public class Sixteen {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int x = 12;
    int y = 12;

    for (int i = 1; i <= x; i++) {
        for (int j = 1; j <= y; j++) {
            System.out.printf("%d ", i * j);
        }
        System.out.println();
    }
}

}

share|improve this answer
for (int x = 1; x <= 12; x++)
{
    for (int y = 1; y <= 12; y++)
    {
        int multiply = x * y;
        System.out.print(multiply + "\t");
    }
    System.out.println();
}
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