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How to ensure the correctness of our structure if we enable overriding in subclasses?

Or, in another words, do we have to ensure this? (If no, please give strong reasons.)


Here is a simple example to show the issue:

Our structure: an ArrayList which only holds even numbers.

The library developer Alice wrote this (correct) class:

import java.util.ArrayList;

public class EvenArrayList {
    private ArrayList<Integer> mArrayList = new ArrayList<Integer>();

    public boolean isEven(int num) { return num % 2 == 0; }

    public void addToList(int num) { if (isEven(num)) mArrayList.add(num); }

    public void printList() { System.out.println(mArrayList); }
}

However, the evil Bob override it with this (wrong) sub-class:

public class EvilEvenArrayList extends EvenArrayList {

    @Override
    public boolean isEven(int num) { return true; }

}

Upon usage, Mandy picks Alice's (correct) class:

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        EvenArrayList eal = new EvenArrayList();
        eal.addToList(1);
        eal.addToList(2);
        eal.addToList(3);
        eal.addToList(4);
        eal.addToList(5);
        eal.printList();       // prints [2, 4]
    }
}

Upon usage, Nancy wants some extra functions, thus she picks Bob's (wrong) sub-class:

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        EvilEvenArrayList eeal = new EvilEvenArrayList();
        eeal.addToList(1);
        eeal.addToList(2);
        eeal.addToList(3);
        ((EvenArrayList) eeal).addToList(4);
        ((EvenArrayList) eeal).addToList(5);
        eeal.printList();      // prints [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
    }
}

As we can see, even Nancy explicitly casts back to the parent-class EvenArrayList, there is no help to the issue.


Up to now, i think of a solution to avoid this (while Alice develop her library). However, this is not a nice solution.

(1) Not to call other methods:

public class EvenArrayList {
    // ...

    public boolean isEven(int num) { return num % 2 == 0; }

    public void addToList(int num) { if (num % 2 == 0) mArrayList.add(num); }

    // ...
}

(2) Or, use only private methods (as they are not inherited):

public class EvenArrayList {
    // ...

    public boolean isEven(int num) { return _isEven(num); }
    private boolean _isEven(int num) { return num % 2 == 0; }

    public void addToList(int num) { if (_isEven(num)) mArrayList.add(num); }

    // ...
}

(3) Or, use only final methods (as they cannot be overridden):

public class EvenArrayList {
    // ...

    public boolean isEven(int num) { return _isEven(num); }
    public final boolean _isEven(int num) { return num % 2 == 0; }

    public void addToList(int num) { if (_isEven(num)) mArrayList.add(num); }

    // ...
}

The three approaches are more or less the same.

(1) is not so nice because we cannot reuse the same block of codes.

(2) and (3) are not so nice because they complicated the class by nearly doubling the among of methods. Moreover, it creates "a trap" for ourselves that we may wrongly use the override-able methods.

In addition, (2) and (3) introduces a little bit function call overheads.


This issue could be both

(1) a security issue:

if Bob intentionally overrides some methods wrongly, and tempts others to use his added-(evil)-feature library, and Nancy is still hacked even she thought she is using Alice's version of method, by casting.

(2) and a potential trap for library developers:

even if we act as both Alice and Bob, incorrect overriding in sub-class may break the whole structure (even ArrayList), and the cause of error may not easily be found, as where it is happening is far from the cause (we never call isEven() upon usage).


What is your opinion? Please provide some solutions. Thanks very much for your inputs!!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

First of all, if you don't want your class to be subclassed, or have not designed it in order to be subclassed, you can (and you should) make it final, or at least document the fact that the class is extendable for internal purpose only, and shouldn't be extended.

Now, if your goal is for this class to be subclassed, you indeed have to design it so that the subclasses don't easily break the invariants of the superclass. That is a tough exercise.

In your example, there is no reason to allow the redefinition of isEven(), so you should simply make it final (if you want to make it public), or private (if you don't want to make it public). A private method is implicitely final. Same for the other methods.

That said, if a subclass decides to extend your class and break its invariants, that's not really your problem. It's the problem of the subclass and of the clients of this subclass, which have chosen to use this broken subclass.

The thing to remember, though, is that if your base class is designed for extension (which is not inherently a good thing), then your business is to make sure that these extensions still work when you roll out a new version of your base class.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply. isEven() is only act as an example. In the real case, it could be a complicated method for checking validity, and this is the reason to allow overriding, for the sake of adding functionalities (like checking for more factors), or improving (faster, may be) the algorithm. Secondly, i am not sure if it is a common practice that library classes are not open for extension. Please give me some pros and cons about this? Finally, this is really a good point that i have to make sure those extensions still work for a new version of base class. Thanks! –  midnite Nov 7 '13 at 9:04
    
Regarding opening for extension, read chapter 16 and 17 of Effective Java by Josh Bloch (whos is behind the collections framework): books.google.fr/…. Regarding using inheritance to provide a better algorithm, I would use the strategy pattern instead. –  JB Nizet Nov 7 '13 at 14:26

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