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I am applying the workaround from SWIG manual section on Nested Classes, that uses the global Inner class. Here I will show you a version like in the manual, but simplified for you as much as possible. I also had to add the inline definition {} to method() because without that SWIG would not work at all.

// File outer.h
class Outer {
public:
  class Inner {};
  void method() {}
};


// File : example.i

// Redefine nested class in global scope in order for SWIG to generate
// a proxy class. Only SWIG parses this definition.
class Inner {};

%{
#include "outer.h"
%}
%include "outer.h"

%{
// SWIG thinks that Inner is a global class, so we need to trick the C++
// compiler into understanding this so called global type.
typedef Outer::Inner Inner;
%}

This works well. However, suppose I change method() to create and return the nested Inner():

Inner method() { return Inner(); }

Now, the results are as I expect (in the real more complex example), so that is not my problem. My problem is, this warns of a leak: repeated application of

>>>Outer().method()

results in

swig/python detected a memory leak of type 'Outer::Inner *', no destructor found.

I know how to fix this kind of thing - provide the full definition of the offending class to SWIG. However, the full definition of the global scope Inner class is already provided. In fact, the definition of the nested class is provided as well but SWIG I guess ignores it and the warning continues.

So the nested class works for me as expected, except I get a memory leak warning.

How to avoid it??

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In the SWIG documentation (6.27 Nested Classes), it looks like there is a feature flag %nestedworkaround that can work around this exact issue:

%module x

class Inner {
};

%nestedworkaround Outer::Inner;

%inline %{
class Outer {
public:
  class Inner {};
  Inner method() { return Inner(); }
};
%}

%{
typedef Outer::Inner Inner;
%}

Result:

>>> import x
>>> x.Outer().method()
<x.Inner; proxy of <Swig Object of type 'Inner *' at 0x0000000002AE6880> >
>>> x.Outer().method()
<x.Inner; proxy of <Swig Object of type 'Inner *' at 0x0000000002AE69A0> >

Without that flag, I received a warning processing the SWIG interface:

x.i(15) : Warning 325: Nested class not currently supported (Inner ignored)

And this was the result:

>>> import x
>>> x.Outer().method()
<Swig Object of type 'Outer::Inner *' at 0x0000000002AA6880>
>>> x.Outer().method()
swig/python detected a memory leak of type 'Outer::Inner *', no destructor found.
<Swig Object of type 'Outer::Inner *' at 0x0000000002AA69A0>
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