Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am getting compilation error when compiling below code.

#include <stdio.h>
main()
{
    printf("Hello 123\n");
    goto lab;
    printf("Bye\n");

lab: int a = 10;
     printf("%d\n",a);
}

When i compile this code it is giving

test.c:8: error: a label can only be part of a statement and a declaration is not a statement

Why first part of a label should be a statement and why not a declaration?

share|improve this question
    
Another explanation is that this is left over from early C where all declarations had to appear at the front of a braced block. A goto couldn't appear before a declaration in the same block, and a goto from outside the block into a a block that had declarations with initializers produced unspecified behavior. There was more of a reason at that point to distinguish between declarations and statements. Another is that declaration can exist outside functions, but statements cannot. –  Mike Housky Nov 7 '13 at 7:04
    
@Mike Housky: I'm not sure what importance you assign to "early C" specifically. It has always been legal to jump over declarations (even initialized ones) in C and it is legal today. A jump into the middle of a block never produced "unspecified behavior" actually, it just left its variables uninitialized. This is how it was back then and this is how it is today. The fact that today you can declare a variable in the middle of the block does not change anything: jumping into the block past that variable leaves it uninitialized. So, nothing really changed from the "early C" times in that regard. –  AndreyT Nov 7 '13 at 7:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In c according to spec

§6.8.1 Labeled Statements:

labeled-statement:
    identifier : statement
    case constant-expression : statement
    default : statement

In c there is no clause that allows for a "labeled declaration". Do this and it will work:

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    printf("Hello 123\n");
    goto lab;
    printf("Bye\n");

lab: 
    {//-------------------------------
        int a = 10;//                 | Scope
        printf("%d\n",a);//           |Unknown - adding a semi colon after the label will have a similar effect
    }//-------------------------------
}

A label makes the compiler interpret the label as a jump directly to the label. You will have similar problems int this kind of code as well:

switch (i)
{   
   case 1:  
       // This will NOT work as well
       int a = 10;  
       break;
   case 2:  
       break;
}

Again just add a scope block ({ }) and it would work:

switch (i)
{   
   case 1:  
   // This will work 
   {//-------------------------------
       int a = 10;//                 | Scoping
       break;//                      | Solves the issue here as well
   }//-------------------------------
   case 2:  
       break;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for your explanation –  Chinna Nov 7 '13 at 6:49
    
@Chinna - you are welcome –  al-Acme Nov 7 '13 at 6:58
    
Sorry, this answer just doesn't make sense. There's no issue with "scope" here - the scope is clearly defined by the enclosing block. The switch example is not similar at all. The potential issue with switch example is that case 2 label jumps over the initialization of a. This would be an error in C++, but not in C. And this is a C question. So, what does that "this will not work" comment is supposed to mean is not clear to me. What exactly "will not work"? And in the original example labels does not even jump over the initialization. –  AndreyT Nov 7 '13 at 7:12
    
@AndreyT - A similar answer here with 338 votes stackoverflow.com/questions/92396/… ? I stated what the reason could be for the syntax to be that way –  al-Acme Nov 7 '13 at 7:14
    
@Acme: The answer with 338 votes applies to C++ and only to C++. The question is mistagged as [C] and [C++] at the same time. The issue described in the question does not exist in C. The fact that nobody noted that [C] tag has no business being there is really strange. Meanwhile, this specific question is a C question. The answer you linked does not apply to C language. –  AndreyT Nov 7 '13 at 7:16

Because this feature is called labeled statement

C11 §6.8.1 Labeled statements

Syntax

labeled-statement:

identifier : statement

case constant-expression : statement

default : statement

A simple fix is to use a null statement (a single semecolon;)

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    printf("Hello 123\n");
    goto lab;
    printf("Bye\n");

lab: ;         //null statement
    int a = 10;
    printf("%d\n",a);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your explanation –  Chinna Nov 7 '13 at 6:49

A simple (but ugly) solution:

lab: ; 
int a = 10;

The empty statement makes everything OK.
The line break and the space before ; aren't needed.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.