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I'm trying to make the switch to OOP. I found a pdf on the internet written by killerphp that seems useful. Followed his examples up 'till now because I got an error. The output is this:

Warning: Missing argument 1 for person::__construct(), called in C:\xampp\htdocs\oop\index.php on line 15 and defined in C:\xampp\htdocs\oop\class_lib.php on line 8

and

Notice: Undefined variable: persons_name in C:\xampp\htdocs\oop\class_lib.php on line 10

Stefan's full name: Stefan Mischook

Nick's full name: Nick Waddles

This is index.php (the page that I run):

<?php
    require_once('class_lib.php');
?>
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>

<head>
    <meta charset="UTF-8">
    <title>OOP in PHP</title>
</head>

    <body>
        <?php
            // Create object without constructor by calling a method
            $stefan = new person();
            $stefan->set_name("Stefan Mischook");
            echo "Stefan's full name: " . $stefan->get_name();

            echo "<br>";

            // Create object with constructor
            $jimmy = new person("Nick Waddles");
            echo "Nick's full name: " . $jimmy->get_name();

        ?>
    </body>
</html>

And here is the class:

<?php
    // A variable inside a class is called a "property"
    // Functions inside a class are called "methods"
    class person
    {
        var $name;

        function __construct($persons_name)
        {
            $this->name = $persons_name;
        }

        function set_name($new_name)
        {
            $this->name = $new_name;
        }

        function get_name()
        {
            return $this->name;
        }
    }

    // $this can be considered a special OO PHP keyword

    // A class is NOT an object. The object gets created when you create an instance of the class.

    // To create an object out of a class you need to use the "new" keyword.

    // When accesign methods and properties of a class you use the -> operator.

    // A constructor is a built-in method that allows you to give your properties values when you create an object
?>

Nevermind the comments, I use them for learning. Thank you very much and please let me know if I need to edit my question before downrating. Cheers!

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by tereško, Damien Overeem, Jimbo, Silent Echo, PeeHaa Nov 7 '13 at 11:17

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – tereško, Damien Overeem, Jimbo, Silent Echo, PeeHaa
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Your construct expects $persons_name - $stefan = new person(); doesn't pass that - so you get an error. – naththedeveloper Nov 7 '13 at 8:19
1  
On the topic of switching to OOP, please be aware that knowing how to build and use classes / objects is only half the story. There are a set of "common approaches and philosophies" that make OOP useful. – Mihai Stancu Nov 7 '13 at 8:29
1  
Moving the code you originally wrote in 100 files / procedures / functions into 100 methods distributed in 10 classes (and adapted to respect object structure) isn't OOP. It's modular programming which happens to be using classes as their modules. – Mihai Stancu Nov 7 '13 at 8:31
1  
Some topics you might want to research after you've mastered the OOP basics, syntax and structure: data encapsulation (data hiding); accessor methods (getters & setters); decoupling and loose coupling of code (interfaces and protocols); single responsibility principle; classes/objects as simplified representations of "real life" data and interactions. – Mihai Stancu Nov 7 '13 at 8:35
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is here:

// Create object without constructor by calling a method
$stefan = new person();                        // <-----
$stefan->set_name("Stefan Mischook");

You're not passing a required parameter to the constructor.

  function __construct($persons_name)
  {
      $this->name = $persons_name;
  }

This (constructor) requires a $persons_name argument to construct a new instance of the person class.

Also (related), your comment // Create object without constructor by calling a method is not at all what the code is doing. You are calling the constructor, and that is the problem. Perhaps this was partially copied from some example, and you missed something?

share|improve this answer
    
Ok. So the problem is that I've left $stefan as it was before creating the constructor. Thank you very much! – SporeDev Nov 7 '13 at 8:21
2  
@SporeDev Ah, yes that would do it. If you don't specify a constructor, there is a default constructor that of course requires no arguments. Once you add the constructor, you have to conform to its signature. – Jonathon Reinhart Nov 7 '13 at 8:22
    
Thank you very much for your clear explanation. Will accept the answer as soon as I can. – SporeDev Nov 7 '13 at 8:23
    
@SporeDev Glad I could help. Welcome to the wonderful world of OOP! Once you get the basics, you'll start to see how OOP makes some programming problems incredibly elegant to solve. – Jonathon Reinhart Nov 7 '13 at 8:24
    
You have no idea how much it took me to give it a try... it seems more simple than many people think. :) – SporeDev Nov 7 '13 at 8:26

Try this:

$stefan = new person("something");
$stefan->set_name("Stefan Mischook");

And it's better to use CamelCase for the class names.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the tip. I noticed that he doesn't uses Camel Case where most devs do. – SporeDev Nov 7 '13 at 8:22
    
There are standards and standards, if you're consistent about how you do yours and accept that working in some other group might imply using their standards you can do whatever you like. – Mihai Stancu Nov 7 '13 at 8:24

Your example would work without error if you replace your following line:

function __construct($persons_name)

for this one:

function __construct($persons_name='')

so specifying a default empty string for the constructor of the object.

share|improve this answer

If you want to be able to call a method without (some) of it's parameters then you need to define their default values.

public function __construct($persons_name = NULL) {
    /* do something with $persons_name */
}

Otherwise the function will expect the parameter to be required and would yield a Notice letting you know about the incorrect function call.

share|improve this answer

You have specified a __construct method/function. When creating a new object of that class it's going to be called. Now it just happens to be so that you've said it requires one argument, and you didn't give it one when you made an object of the class. Here's how it should have been:

$stefan = new person('Stefan Mischook');

No need to use the set_name method/function later on then, unless you want to change it.

You could also have done this to your __construct method/function:

function __construct($persons_name='')

What this does is to auto assign $person_name to be an empty string unless you give it an argument, in which case the argument you give will replace the empty string.

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