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Can someone explain to me what the contentInset property in a UIScrollView instance is used for? And maybe provide an example?

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Out of curiosity, did you read the documentation for the property? developer.apple.com/iphone/library/documentation/UIKit/… –  Marc W Dec 31 '09 at 1:17
1  
Marc, I did... That was the first place I looked at. See my comment below under jball's answer. –  ForeignerBR Dec 31 '09 at 1:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 122 down vote accepted

It sets the distance of the inset between the content view and the enclosing scroll view. aScrollView.contentInset = UIEdgeInsetsMake(0, 0, 0, 7.0);

Here's a good iOS Reference Library article on scroll views that has an informative screenshot (fig 1-3) - I'll replicate it via text here:

  _|←_cW_→_|_↓_
   |       | 
---------------
   |content| ↑
 ↑ |content| contentInset.top
cH |content|
 ↓ |content| contentInset.bottom
   |content| ↓
---------------
  _|_______|___ 
             ↑


   (cH = contentSize.height; cW = contentSize.width)

The scroll view encloses the content view plus whatever padding is provided by the specified content insets.

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is it used to add a padding to the UIScrollView then? If not could you give me a practical example. My problem is not how to implement it but when to implement it. –  ForeignerBR Dec 31 '09 at 1:29
13  
Yes, it pads the content on the inside of the scroll view. It's akin to the CSS padding property. –  Marc W Dec 31 '09 at 1:37
    
Sorry to piggyback on this, I can move it its own question, but based on this, what actually happens if you set each contentInset value to 0 other than the contentHeight for example? Does that force the whole scrollview to be the height you set it to? –  jakev Apr 14 '13 at 17:33
    
@jakev No, the .frame property controls the scrollview's dimensions within it's parent (See this answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/5361369/…). Setting the contentInsets to 0 for all sides simply means that the content will not be padded at all within the scrollview. So when you scroll to the top, the content is sitting right against the top of the scrollview. If you scroll to the bottom, the content reaches right to the bottom of the scrollview. –  Jeremy Wiebe Aug 13 '13 at 15:34

While jball's answer is an excellent description of content insets, it doesn't answer the question of when to use it. I'll borrow from his diagrams:

  _|←_cW_→_|_↓_
   |       | 
---------------
   |content| ↑
 ↑ |content| contentInset.top
cH |content|
 ↓ |content| contentInset.bottom
   |content| ↓
---------------
   |content|    
-------------↑-

That's what you get when you do it, but the usefulness of it only shows when you scroll:

  _|←_cW_→_|_↓_
   |content| ← content is still visible
---------------
   |content| ↑
 ↑ |content| contentInset.top
cH |content|
 ↓ |content| contentInset.bottom
   |content| ↓
---------------
  _|_______|___ 
             ↑

That top row of content will still be visible because it's still inside the frame of the scroll view. One way to think of the top offset is "how much to shift the content down the scroll view when we're scrolled all the way to the top"

To see a place where this is actually used, look at the build-in Photos app on the iphone. The Navigation bar and status bar are transparent, and the contents of the scroll view are visible underneath. That's because the scroll view's frame extends out that far. But if it wasn't for the content inset, you would never be able to have the top of the content clear that transparent navigation bar when you go all the way to the top.

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The nice thing here is that you can use the insets to create the "scroll under status bar with blur" effect. –  TheEye Mar 12 at 12:04
    
Nice explanation, upvoted. –  Raj Jul 27 at 6:31

Great question.

Consider the following example (scroller is a UIScrollView):

float offset = 1000;
[super viewDidLoad];
for (int i=0;i<500; i++) {
    UILabel *label = [[[UILabel alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(i * 100, 50, 95, 100)] autorelease];
    [label setText:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"label %d",i]];
    [self.scroller addSubview:label];
    [self.scroller setContentSize:CGSizeMake(self.view.frame.size.width * 2 + offset, 0)];
    [self.scroller setContentInset:UIEdgeInsetsMake(0, -offset, 0, 0)];
}

The insets are the ONLY way to force your scroller to have a "window" on the content where you want it. I'm still messing with this sample code, but the idea is there: use the insets to get a "window" on your UIScrollView.

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