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Most answers only address the already-answered question about Hamming weights but ignore the point about find and dealing with the sparsity. Apparently the answer by Shai here addresses the point about find -- but I am not yet able to verify it. My answer here does not utilise the ingenuity of other answers such as the bitshifting but good enough example answer.

Input

>> mlf=sparse([],[],[],2^31+1,1);mlf(1)=10;mlf(10)=111;mlf(77)=1010;  
>> transpose(dec2bin(find(mlf)))

ans =

001
000
000
011
001
010
101

Goal

1
0
0
2
1
1
2    

Fast calculation for the amount of ones in binary numbers with the sparse structure?

share|improve this question
    
Note sure I understand the question, because it seems so simple: if you are working in binary, sum does exactly what you want. –  Marc Claesen Nov 7 '13 at 12:07
    
@MarcClaesen I cannot understand: this sum(dec2bin(10)) returns 194 instead of 2 where its binary is 1010. So the sum does not sum the amount of ones in binary number. –  hhh Nov 7 '13 at 12:10
    
@hhh How do you define the binary number: a string? A vector? –  Luis Mendo Nov 7 '13 at 12:11
    
@LuisMendo I convert a DEC number to binary with dec2bin as the above example in the q. There may be some fast way with modulo to achieve my goal of getting the number of active vars. –  hhh Nov 7 '13 at 12:12
    
possible duplicate of Calculating Hamming weight efficiently in matlab –  Rody Oldenhuis Nov 7 '13 at 12:47

6 Answers 6

You can do this in tons of ways. The simplest I think would be

% Example data
F = [268469248 285213696 536904704 553649152];

% Solution 1
sum(dec2bin(F)-'0',2)

And the fastest (as found here):

% Solution 2
w = uint32(F');

p1 = uint32(1431655765);
p2 = uint32(858993459);
p3 = uint32(252645135);
p4 = uint32(16711935);
p5 = uint32(65535);

w = bitand(bitshift(w, -1), p1) + bitand(w, p1);
w = bitand(bitshift(w, -2), p2) + bitand(w, p2);
w = bitand(bitshift(w, -4), p3) + bitand(w, p3);
w = bitand(bitshift(w, -8), p4) + bitand(w, p4);
w = bitand(bitshift(w,-16), p5) + bitand(w, p5);
share|improve this answer
    
I have 31 bits in the above example but can have more than that so the solutino 2 means creating p1 p2 ... p31 for each bit? –  hhh Nov 7 '13 at 12:44
    
@hhh: No; just try it. This works for any size F. –  Rody Oldenhuis Nov 7 '13 at 12:45
    
@hhh: I can't test if this works for 64-bit integers (R2010a doesn't support addition of 2 uint64), so if that applies to your case, it needs some tweaking. –  Rody Oldenhuis Nov 7 '13 at 12:50
    
Yes, the solution 2 looks to be a bit faster than the solution 1 -- cannot yet understand what it does, reading. What do you think about other methods mentioned? –  hhh Nov 7 '13 at 12:53
1  
@hhh: Shai's lookup table is the most elegant I think, however, it involves 3 divisions, 4 mods and a lookup per element. The solution above does no math other than addition and bit shifting (which is pretty cheap on modern CPUs), so it should be faster. –  Rody Oldenhuis Nov 7 '13 at 13:05

According to your comments, you convert a vector of numbers to binary string representations using dec2bin. Then you can achieve what you want as follows, where I'm using vector [10 11 12] as an example:

>> sum(dec2bin([10 11 12])=='1',2)

ans =

     2
     3
     2

Or equivalently,

>> sum(dec2bin([10 11 12])-'0',2)

For speed, you could avoid dec2bin like this (uses modulo-2 operations, inspired in dec2bin code):

>> sum(rem(floor(bsxfun(@times, [10 11 12].', pow2(1-N:0))),2),2)

ans =

     2
     3
     2

where N is the maximum number of binary digits you expect.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 but you wont be able to use nnz to apply it to each row/column, you'll have to use sum –  Amro Nov 7 '13 at 12:17
    
ERR The dec2bin(find(mlf)) returns an array where nnz(dec2bin(find(mlfNew))=='1') sums all ones, not ones per line. –  hhh Nov 7 '13 at 12:17
    
@hhh So you have several numbers, I see. Correcting... –  Luis Mendo Nov 7 '13 at 12:18
    
@hhh Plese see updated, faster version –  Luis Mendo Nov 7 '13 at 12:34

If you really want fast, I think a look-up-table would be handy. You can simply map, for 0..255 how many ones they have. Do this once, and then you only need to decompose an int to its bytes look the sum up in the table and add the results - no need to go to strings...


An example:

>> LUT = sum(dec2bin(0:255)-'0',2); % construct the look up table (only once)
>> ii = uint32( find( mlf ) ); % get the numbers
>> vals = LUT( mod( ii, 256 ) + 1 ) + ... % lower bytes
          LUT( mod( ii/256, 256 ) + 1 ) + ...
          LUT( mod( ii/65536, 256 ) + 1 ) + ...
          LUT( mod( ii/16777216, 256 ) + 1 );

Using typecast (as suggested by Amro):

>> vals = sum( reshape(LUT(double(typecast(ii,'uint8'))+1), 4, [] ), 1 )';

Run time comparison

>> ii = uint32(randi(intmax('uint32'),100000,1));
>> tic; vals1 = sum( reshape(LUT(typecast(ii,'uint8')+1), 4, [] ), 1 )'; toc, %//'
>> tic; vals2 = sum(dec2bin(ii)-'0',2); toc
>> dii = double(ii); % type issues
>> tic; vals3 = sum(rem(floor(bsxfun(@times, dii, pow2(1-32:0))),2),2); toc

Results:

Elapsed time is 0.006144 seconds.  <-- this answer
Elapsed time is 0.120216 seconds.  <-- using dec2bin
Elapsed time is 0.118009 seconds.  <-- using rem and bsxfun
share|improve this answer
1  
@hhh: he meant something like this: stackoverflow.com/a/1545490/97160 –  Amro Nov 7 '13 at 12:19
1  
@hhh like this stackoverflow.com/a/13896102/1714410 –  Shai Nov 7 '13 at 12:21
3  
@Amro 32 bit is indeed too space consuming. Thus my proposal is to split ints into their bytes and use LUT for each byte individually. –  Shai Nov 7 '13 at 12:22
1  
@Shai: good idea, something like typecast(uint32(268469248),'uint8') then apply the LUT to each byte –  Amro Nov 7 '13 at 12:25
1  
@Shai: careful there was a small bug in the method I initially suggested using typecast; integers arithmetic in MATLAB are saturating, so uint8(255)+1 == uint8(255), which gives the wrong result when applying the LUT.. I fixed it in my answer –  Amro Nov 8 '13 at 5:35

Here is an example to show @Shai's idea of using a lookup table:

% build lookup table for 8-bit integers
lut = sum(dec2bin(0:255)-'0', 2);

% get indices
idx = find(mlf);

% break indices into 8-bit integers and apply LUT
nbits = lut(double(typecast(uint32(idx),'uint8')) + 1);

% sum number of bits in each
s = sum(reshape(nbits,4,[]))

you might have to switch to uint64 instead if you have really large sparse arrays with large indices outside the 32-bit range..


EDIT:

Here is another solution for you using Java:

idx = find(mlf);
s = arrayfun(@java.lang.Integer.bitCount, idx);

EDIT#2:

Here is yet another solution implemented as C++ MEX function. It relies on std::bitset::count:

bitset_count.cpp

#include "mex.h"
#include <bitset>

void mexFunction(int nlhs, mxArray *plhs[], int nrhs, const mxArray *prhs[])
{
    // validate input/output arguments
    if (nrhs != 1) {
        mexErrMsgTxt("One input argument required.");
    }
    if (!mxIsUint32(prhs[0]) || mxIsComplex(prhs[0]) || mxIsSparse(prhs[0])) {
        mexErrMsgTxt("Input must be a 32-bit integer dense matrix.");
    }
    if (nlhs > 1) {
        mexErrMsgTxt("Too many output arguments.");
    }

    // create output array
    mwSize N = mxGetNumberOfElements(prhs[0]);
    plhs[0] = mxCreateDoubleMatrix(N, 1, mxREAL);

    // get pointers to data
    double *counts = mxGetPr(plhs[0]);
    uint32_T *idx = reinterpret_cast<uint32_T*>(mxGetData(prhs[0]));

    // count bits set for each 32-bit integer number
    for(mwSize i=0; i<N; i++) {
        std::bitset<32> bs(idx[i]);
        counts[i] = bs.count();
    }
}

Compile the above function as mex -largeArrayDims bitset_count.cpp, then run it as usual:

idx = find(mlf);
s = bitset_count(uint32(idx))

I decided to compare all the solutions mentioned so far:

function [t,v] = testBitsetCount()
    % random data (uint32 vector)
    x = randi(intmax('uint32'), [1e5,1], 'uint32');

    % build lookup table (done once)
    LUT = sum(dec2bin(0:255,8)-'0', 2);

    % functions to compare
    f = {
        @() bit_twiddling(x)      % bit twiddling method
        @() lookup_table(x,LUT);  % lookup table method
        @() bitset_count(x);      % MEX-function (std::bitset::count)
        @() dec_to_bin(x);        % dec2bin
        @() java_bitcount(x);     % Java Integer.bitCount
    };

    % compare timings and check results are valid
    t = cellfun(@timeit, f, 'UniformOutput',true);
    v = cellfun(@feval, f, 'UniformOutput',false);
    assert(isequal(v{:}));
end

function s = lookup_table(x,LUT)
    s = sum(reshape(LUT(double(typecast(x,'uint8'))+1),4,[]))';
end

function s = dec_to_bin(x)
    s = sum(dec2bin(x,32)-'0', 2);
end

function s = java_bitcount(x)
    s = arrayfun(@java.lang.Integer.bitCount, x);
end

function s = bit_twiddling(x)
    p1 = uint32(1431655765);
    p2 = uint32(858993459);
    p3 = uint32(252645135);
    p4 = uint32(16711935);
    p5 = uint32(65535);

    s = x;
    s = bitand(bitshift(s, -1), p1) + bitand(s, p1);
    s = bitand(bitshift(s, -2), p2) + bitand(s, p2);
    s = bitand(bitshift(s, -4), p3) + bitand(s, p3);
    s = bitand(bitshift(s, -8), p4) + bitand(s, p4);
    s = bitand(bitshift(s,-16), p5) + bitand(s, p5);
end

The times elapsed in seconds:

t = 
    0.0009    % bit twiddling method
    0.0087    % lookup table method
    0.0134    % C++ std::bitset::count
    0.1946    % MATLAB dec2bin
    0.2343    % Java Integer.bitCount
share|improve this answer
1  
when switching to 64 bits you'll need to reshape to 8. –  Shai Nov 7 '13 at 12:42
    
yes that too :) (sorry for the duplication, I just saw you posted the same thing) –  Amro Nov 7 '13 at 12:43
    
Excellent summary! More accessible for future users, thank you! –  hhh Nov 7 '13 at 22:42

This gives you the rowsums of the binary numbers from the sparse structure.

>> mlf=sparse([],[],[],2^31+1,1);mlf(1)=10;mlf(10)=111;mlf(77)=1010;  
>> transpose(dec2bin(find(mlf)))

ans =

001
000
000
011
001
010
101

>> sum(ismember(transpose(dec2bin(find(mlf))),'1'),2)

ans =

     1
     0
     0
     2
     1
     1
     2

Hope someone able to find faster rowsummation!

share|improve this answer
    
what was wrong with all the other answers you got? –  Shai Nov 12 '13 at 12:22
    
@Shai They did not address the point about sparsity, this is not a question just about Hamming weight. Now the next puzzle is to use the methods in other answer to make this even better. I want to make this question distinct from the Hamming weight question by focusing it to many binary numbers like the question provides (original q had them so better be honest to the original indentation, somehow this is getting only a question about a Hamming weight although that was not the original purpose) –  hhh Nov 12 '13 at 13:14
    
the only thing sparse in your question is the origin of the numbers. I do not see any way around the find(mlf). once you have the indices all methods proposed in the answers are faster than dec2bin. If you are looking for a method to speed up find(mlf) then you'll have to state it explicitly in your question. –  Shai Nov 12 '13 at 13:36
    
@Shai Good point, added it explicitly. Mind you rethink your circulating downvotes or explain. –  hhh Nov 12 '13 at 14:04
    
have you checked my new answer? –  Shai Nov 12 '13 at 17:45

Mex it!


Save this code as countTransBits.cpp:

#include "mex.h"

void mexFunction( int nout, mxArray* pout[], int nin, mxArray* pin[] ) {
mxAssert( nin == 1 && mxIsSparse(pin[0]) && mxGetN( pin[0] ) == 1,
            "expecting single sparse column vector input" );
    mxAssert( nout == 1, "expecting single output" );

    // set output, assuming 32 bits, set to 64 if needed
    pout[0] = mxCreateNumericMatrix( 32, 1, mxUINT32_CLASS, mxREAL );
    unsigned int* counter = (unsigned int*)mxGetData( pout[0] );
    for ( int i = 0; i < 32; i++ ) {
        counter[i] = 0;
    }

    // start working
    mwIndex *pIr = mxGetIr( pin[0] );
    mwIndex* pJc = mxGetJc( pin[0] );
    double*  pr = mxGetPr( pin[0] );
    for ( mwSize i = pJc[0]; i < pJc[1]; i++ ) {
        if ( pr[i] != 0 ) {// make sure entry is non-zero
            unsigned int entry = pIr[i] + 1; // cast to unsigned int and add 1 for 1-based indexing in Matlab
            int bit = 0;
            while ( entry != 0 && bit < 32 ) {
                counter[bit] += ( entry & 0x1 ); // count the lsb
                bit++;
                entry >>= 1; // shift right
            }
        }
    }
}

Compile it in Matlab

>> mex -largeArrayDims -O countTransBits.cpp

Run the code

>> countTransBits( mlf )

Note that the output count in 32 bins lsb to msb.

share|improve this answer
    
Filename with >? Can you explain how this works? I think I did this but the file disapeared. –  hhh Nov 12 '13 at 17:55
1  
@hhh - mex files are a way of calling C/C++ code from Matlab. what you need is to save the c++ code to 'countTransBits.cpp'. Then, in matlab (make sure countTransBits.cpp is in your CWD) just >> mex -O -largeArrayDims countTransBits.cpp. If all goes well (you might need to setup a mex compiler first: >>mex -setup) you'll be able to call countTransBits as a regular matlab function. –  Shai Nov 12 '13 at 18:06
    
On OSX 10.9 getting this err pastie.org/8475365, apparently some platform compability thing, taking some extra time to fix it... –  hhh Nov 12 '13 at 18:10
1  
@hhh see my edit. also, you might find stackoverflow.com/questions/19887677/… relevant? –  Shai Nov 12 '13 at 18:21
    
Updating xcode did not remove the err, asked the earlier guy having the problem how he solved this, waiting for the answer. –  hhh Nov 14 '13 at 15:59

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