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I found an good shell function diff-lines() from Using git diff, how can I get added and modified lines numbers?

I'v add the function in my .bashrc file, and it works in my commandline:

[marslo@mppdev ~/Tools/Git/LinuxStuff]
$ git diff -U0 | diff-lines
Scripts/.marslorc:29:-# Inspired from http://stackoverflow.com/questions/8259851/using-git-diff-how-can-i-get-added-and-modified-lines-numbers
Scripts/.marslorc:29:+# Inspired from http://stackoverflow.com/questions/8259851/using-git-diff-how-can-i-get-added-and-modified-lines-numbers/12179492#12179492

However, when I tried to add the command as a git alias, here something wrong:

[marslo@mppdev ~/Tools/Git/LinuxStuff]
$ cat ~/.gitconfig | grep "ldiff ="
    ldiff = "!bash -c 'git diff -U0' | diff-lines"
[marslo@mppdev ~/Tools/Git/LinuxStuff]
$ git ldiff
sh: diff-lines: command not found
fatal: Failed to run 'bash -c 'git diff -U0' | diff-lines' when expanding alias 'ldiff'

And, bash -c 'git diff -U0' | diff-lines still works

[marslo@mppdev ~/Tools/Git/LinuxStuff]
$ bash -c 'git diff -U0' | diff-lines
Scripts/.marslorc:29:-# Inspired from http://stackoverflow.com/questions/8259851/using-git-diff-how-can-i-get-added-and-modified-lines-numbers
Scripts/.marslorc:29:+# Inspired from http://stackoverflow.com/questions/8259851/using-git-diff-how-can-i-get-added-and-modified-lines-numbers/12179492#12179492

Here the details: ldff

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is that diff-lines is a shell function and not an actual executable. When you run "!bash -c 'git diff -U0' | diff-lines" you get an error because the shell is not sourcing your ~/.bashrc and so it does not know about diff-lines. This is normal behavior for shells--they only source those settings in specific circumstances, and running a command is not one of them.

So here are a few recommendations. First, if the line number feature is nice outside of git, consider making diff-lines a script instead of just a shell function:

#!/bin/bash

diff-lines() {
    local path=
    local line=
    while read; do
        esc=$'\033'
        if [[ $REPLY =~ ---\ (a/)?.* ]]; then
            continue
        elif [[ $REPLY =~ \+\+\+\ (b/)?([^[:blank:]$esc]+).* ]]; then
            path=${BASH_REMATCH[2]}
        elif [[ $REPLY =~ @@\ -[0-9]+(,[0-9]+)?\ \+([0-9]+)(,[0-9]+)?\ @@.* ]]; then
            line=${BASH_REMATCH[2]}
        elif [[ $REPLY =~ ^($esc\[[0-9;]+m)*([\ +-]) ]]; then
            echo "$path:$line:$REPLY"
            if [[ ${BASH_REMATCH[2]} != - ]]; then
                ((line++))
            fi
        fi
    done
}

diff-lines

You can then set your alias to be:

ldiff = !sh -c 'git diff "$@" | diff-lines' -

This will also allow you to pass parameters to git ldiff, just like the real diff command. You could also use diff-lines as your pager by doing the following in your ~/.gitconfig:

[pager]
    diff = diff-lines | less

Then, the regular git diff command will be piped through your diff-lines script and finally through less to get the paging. I use that same trick to highlight words changes in lines.

Another option is what Adam mentioned: create a script called git-ldiff that runs your diff command and pipes it through diff-lines

#!/bin/bash

diff-lines() {
    local path=
    local line=
    while read; do
        esc=$'\033'
        if [[ $REPLY =~ ---\ (a/)?.* ]]; then
            continue
        elif [[ $REPLY =~ \+\+\+\ (b/)?([^[:blank:]$esc]+).* ]]; then
            path=${BASH_REMATCH[2]}
        elif [[ $REPLY =~ @@\ -[0-9]+(,[0-9]+)?\ \+([0-9]+)(,[0-9]+)?\ @@.* ]]; then
            line=${BASH_REMATCH[2]}
        elif [[ $REPLY =~ ^($esc\[[0-9;]+m)*([\ +-]) ]]; then
            echo "$path:$line:$REPLY"
            if [[ ${BASH_REMATCH[2]} != - ]]; then
                ((line++))
            fi
        fi
    done
}

git diff "$@" | diff-lines

Note: this is exactly the same script as above with a small modification to the last line.

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Hi @jszkmeister, diff-lines cannot be set at the end of .bashrc. Otherwise, the bash always waiting for read when I open a terminal. –  Marslo Nov 7 '13 at 17:53
    
Hi, I tired all your method, they all cannot work except create a new script and add the location to $PATH. Is there any way to alias without create a new file? Thanks –  Marslo Nov 7 '13 at 18:00
    
@MarsloJiao As I said in the post, you would need to make diff-lines a script--that's the best way of doing this. There are other choices, but I'm consider them subpar for various reasons. You could, for example, source your .bashrc manually or force a login shell. The first choice would look something like this: ldiff = !bash -c '. ~/.bashrc && git diff "$@" | diff-lines' -. You could also do: ldiff = !bash -l -c 'git diff "$@" | diff-lines' - to make it a login shell (which will read your ~/.bashrc). The best option is to create a script though. –  jszakmeister Nov 7 '13 at 21:06
    
Oh yeah!!!! It works!! The alias is exactlly ldiff = !bash -c '. ~/.bashrc && git diff "$@" | diff-lines' -. Thanks a lot! –  Marslo Nov 8 '13 at 9:58
    
However, I have a question, .bashrc will be executed while I login. And it actually works (I can use diff-lines in command line). Why this file needs be source again? –  Marslo Nov 8 '13 at 10:03
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Instead of using an alias:

  1. Put your code into a script,
  2. Name the script git-ldiff,
  3. Use chmod +x script to make it executable, and
  4. Put the script in a directory that's in your PATH.

Now, when you type git ldiff, git will find and run your scipt.

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Hi @Adam, thanks for your comment. However, I don't want create scripts file alone (even if I knew this way works). I have much function in my .bashrc, it's not convenient to manager them. And my PATH will be pretty long.. –  Marslo Nov 7 '13 at 17:35
    
Seems only this way can work. –  Marslo Nov 7 '13 at 18:06
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