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I'd like to use parameters pack, but find the problem. Some code:

template <typename Function, typename... Args>
auto f(Function func, Args... args) -> decltype(func(args...))
{
    auto f11 = std::bind(func, args...);
    f11();
}

void print(const char* string)
{
    std::cout << string << std::endl;
}

All of this works well:

    f([] (const char* additional, const char* more) {
        std::cout << "hello ( " << additional << ", " << more << " )" << std::endl;
    }, "additional text", "and one more");

    auto printFunction = std::bind(&print, std::placeholders::_1);

    printFunction("hello from print bind");

    f(print, "hello from print directly");

but if i would like to give std::function to parameters pack:

f([] (std::function<void(const char*)> printParamFunc) {
 printParamFunc("hello from print from std::function");
}, printFunction);

application no more compiles.

So, what the problem to use function as parameter in pack?

Thanks.

UPDATE: if change code of f to:

template <typename Function, typename... Args>
auto f(Function func, Args... args) -> decltype(func(args...))
{
    func(args...);
}

it works well, but i wouldn't like to execute this function here, i wanna create function and pass it like param.

UPDATE2: Code execution example: http://ideone.com/gDjnPq

UPDATE3: Clear code with compilation error: http://ideone.com/50z7IN

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1  
Then add the most important parts. Try to decipher it and read what it wants to say. Without the error nobody can help you. – Arne Mertz Nov 7 '13 at 13:01
3  
Can you put together a sscce.org on something like ideone and add a link so we can see the resulting error messages? – Yakk Nov 7 '13 at 13:01
1  
You can make it work if instead of auto, give printFunction type std::function<void(const char*)>. I don't know why's that. The error message from clang suggests that it can't deduce the _Result type of bind expression. – jrok Nov 7 '13 at 14:42
2  
Here is a sscce for the above: ideone.com/50z7IN -- I do not yet know why it doesn't compile, but there it is! – Yakk Nov 7 '13 at 15:36
1  
Answer is here Some specific of std::bind. – user1733773 Nov 8 '13 at 9:25

I understand the situation a bit better now.

Problem can be retroduced by this code:

void print(const char* string)
{
    std::cout << string << std::endl;
}

int main(int argc, char ** argv)
{
    auto lambda = [] (std::function< void ( const char * ) > printParamFunc) {
        printParamFunc("hello from lambda!");
    };

    std::bind(lambda, std::bind(print, std::placeholders::_1))();
}

Nested std::bind trying to evaluate and fails with conversion _1 to const char *. It is specific of std::bind.

We need analogue of boost::bind::protect -- functor storing other functor -- and it is solve problem:

template <class F>
struct lazy_evaluate {
    typedef typename F::result_type T;

    explicit lazy_evaluate(F f) : f_(f) {}

    template <class... Args>
    T operator()(Args&&... args) 
    {
        f_(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
    }

private:
    F f_; 
};

template <class F>
lazy_evaluate<F> lazy(F f)
{
    return lazy_evaluate<F>(f);
}

nested std::bind now looks like:

std::bind(lambda, lazy(std::bind(print, std::placeholders::_1)))();

and works well.

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