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I'm new to ruby, and want to use thread. In purpose, I want thread to spawn thread, I have below code:

require 'thread'
semaphore = Mutex.new

thr = Array.new
outputs = Array.new
scripts = Array.new
for i in 1..3
  thr[i] = Thread.new do
      puts "adding #{i} thread\n"
      puts "ready to create #{i} thread\n"
      scripts[i]= Thread.new do
        puts "in #{i} thread\n"
        puts "X#{i}\n"
        outputs[i] = "a#{i}" 
      end
  end 
end
for i in 1..3
  thr[i].join
end
for i in 1..3
  scripts[i].join
end
for i in 1..3
  puts outputs[i]
end

The output is

adding 1 thread
adding 2 thread
adding 3 thread
ready to create 3 thread
ready to create 1 thread
ready to create 1 thread
in 1 thread
in 1 thread
in 2 thread
X2
X3
X1
C:/Users/user/workspace/ruby-test/test.rb:61: undefined method `join' for nil:NilClass (NoMethodError)
    from C:/Users/liux14/workspace/ruby-test/test.rb:60:in `each'
    from C:/Users/liux14/workspace/ruby-test/test.rb:60

The first three lines are correct, but following i is messed up.

two i = 1 and one i = 2 and one i = 3. And the one of output[i] is nil.

What I missed?

share|improve this question
2  
You just saw your first race condition. Congrats. :) –  Sergio Tulentsev Nov 7 '13 at 13:08
    
Threads run concurrently. You don't have any guarantees about what order things will happen in. I would guess that your output will vary on repeated runs. –  Some Guy Nov 7 '13 at 13:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your use of the for i in 1..3 statement might be making i available outside of the for block, and makes it shared across the parent and child threads.

Try it with a block instead:

(1..3).each do |i|
  # code
end

#!/usr/bin/env ruby

require 'thread'
semaphore = Mutex.new

thr = Array.new
outputs = Array.new
scripts = Array.new
(1..3).each do |i|
  thr[i] = Thread.new do
      puts "adding #{i} thread\n"
      puts "ready to create #{i} thread\n"
      scripts[i]= Thread.new do
        puts "in #{i} thread\n"
        puts "X#{i}\n"
        outputs[i] = "a#{i}" 
      end
  end 
end
(1..3).each do |i|
  thr[i].join
end
(1..3).each do |i|
  scripts[i].join
end
(1..3).each do |i|
  puts outputs[i]
end

denis@DB:~/wk $ ./test.rb 
adding 1 thread
ready to create 1 thread
adding 3 thread
ready to create 3 thread
adding 2 thread
ready to create 2 thread
in 1 thread
X1
in 3 thread
in 2 thread
X3
X2
a1
a2
a3
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but if it's shared, the second thr[2] get the value i=2, and reporting adding 2 thread, but why there are two i=1 thread? only the main thread is increasing i, so every time the main thread increase i by 1, the sub thread should never get i=1 twice, where am I wrong? –  Wingzero Nov 7 '13 at 13:22
    
When you use the for i in 1..3 construct instead of the iterator/each construct, i is not local to within each block. Instead, it's shared within the enclosing scope: the i in the thread-related for block gets overwritten (to 1 in your example) when the next for block kicks in. –  Denis Nov 7 '13 at 13:26
    
Sorry, still a little confused, why it's overwritten to 1? Much appreciated –  Wingzero Nov 7 '13 at 13:32
    
In your first for loop, i goes from 1 to 3 and starts three threads, all of which use (and share) i. The main thread continues on, alongside the child threads. Enter the next for loop from the main thread: the first thing it does is overwrite i, setting it to 1 in the parent thread and its three children. It contrast, the iterator approach I highlighted above ensures that i is local to each block. –  Denis Nov 7 '13 at 13:44
1  
Find this:web.archive.org/web/20120711111451/http://…. I think explains, thank you so much! –  Wingzero Nov 7 '13 at 14:07

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