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Figure 1

for (var i = Things.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
    setTimeout(function(){
        // do something with Things[i]
    }, 200 * i);
};

Figure 2

$(".things").each(function(i,o){
    setTimeout(function(){
        //do something with o
    }, 200 * i);
});

Why does figure 2 work but figure 1 doesn't? Every time I try the first method i always equals -1. What gives?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted
for (var i = Things.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
    (function(i){
        setTimeout(function(){
          // do something with Things[i]
        }, 200 * i);
    })(i)
};

You need to create a scope for i, so it maintains its value. Otherwise it gets updated with the loop.

The reason it works for figure 2 ($.each(function(i,o){...})) is because the anonymous function here is creating a closure for i.

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I assume this would not work in a case where i would be a reference ? the i accessed in setTimeout references the i from the closure's scope right ? What if you modify i within this scope, does it also modify the i from the upper scope ? Wouldn't it be a good idea to give it a different name ? –  Virus721 Nov 7 '13 at 14:00
2  
@Virus721 - No the i passed through becomes completely separate from the upper scope. You can do what you like with it and it wouldn't modify the looping variable i. You could give it a different name if you like, but it wouldn't make a difference. –  ahren Nov 7 '13 at 14:06
    
Although this is a correct statement, it's not an answer to his question. This does not explain why i is -1. –  Archer Nov 7 '13 at 14:09
    
I wonder something. Isn't this just shifting the problem ? i mean, whether you create a closure a pass "i" to it or you pass "i" to setTimeout, in both cases the i is copied to a different scope. In your solution the i is copied to the closure's scope, and without the closure, the i is copied to the setTimeout's scope, right ? –  Virus721 Nov 7 '13 at 14:10
2  
@ahren Of course - silly of me. And now this answer makes perfect sense to me :) +1 –  Archer Nov 7 '13 at 14:14

@ahren answer is ok. I got similar thing without IIF, which could be more simple for someone...

function loop(i) {
// do something with Things[i]
    if(--i>=0) {
        setTimeout(loop, 200*i, i);
    }
}

setTimeout(loop, 200*Things.length, Things.length);
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