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First off, I'm using Cheerio for some DOM access and parsing with Node.js. Good times.

Heres the situation:

I have a function that I need to create an object. That object uses variables for both its keys and values, and then return that single object. Example:

stuff = function (thing, callback) {
  var inputs  = $('div.quantity > input').map(function(){
    var key   = this.attr('name')
     ,  value = this.attr('value');

     return { key : value }
  }) 

  callback(null, inputs);
}

It outputs this:

[ { key: '1' }, { key: '1' } ]

(.map() returns an array of objects fyi)

I need key to actually be the string from this.attr('name').

Whats the best way to assign a string as a key in Javascript, considering what I'm trying to do?

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marked as duplicate by Bergi Nov 18 at 5:45

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2 Answers 2

up vote 19 down vote accepted

On object literals, the key is always interpreted literally, as a string. To use a "dynamic" key, you have to use bracket notation:

var obj = {};
obj[myKey] = value;

In your case:

stuff = function (thing, callback) {
  var inputs  = $('div.quantity > input').map(function(){
    var key   = this.attr('name')
     ,  value = this.attr('value')
     ,  ret   = {};

     ret[key] = value;
     return ret;
  }) 

  callback(null, inputs);
}

Edit: For ES6 (the next version of Javascript), there's a proposal (as of Nov. 2013) for a syntax to create objects with computed keys: Object Literal Computed Property Keys. The syntax is:

var obj = {
  [myKey]: value,
}

If applied to the OP's scenario, it would turn into:

stuff = function (thing, callback) {
  var inputs  = $('div.quantity > input').map(function(){
    return {
      [this.attr('name')]: this.attr('value'),
    };
  }) 

  callback(null, inputs);
}

Using Google's traceur, it is possible to try this syntax today

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Great edit. Now if ES6 can just be officially released we might have a shot at world peace! :) –  JDillon522 Sep 12 at 18:44

You can't define an object literal with a dynamic key. Do this :

var o = {};
o[key] = value;
return o;

There's no shortcut.

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