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I'm trying to make a fibonacci number generator that stops at a given amount, but it usually goes past the amount. What am I doing wrong?

#Fibonacci number generator
a=0
b=1
print("Fibonacci number generator.")
stopNumber=input("How high do you want to go? If you want to go forever, put n.")
print(1)
while stopNumber=="n":
        a=a+b
        b=b+a
        print(a)
        print(b)
else:
    while int(stopNumber) > a or int(stopNumber) > b:
        a=a+b
        b=b+a
        print(a)
        print(b)
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Could you show us some output from this? If you enter 20, what do you get? –  wdh Nov 7 '13 at 14:20
1  
Pretty weird fibbonacci generator. Why are you doing a=a+b and b=b+a in single step? It should be something like prev, current = current, prev + current –  J0HN Nov 7 '13 at 14:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Using your code:

#Fibonacci number generator
a=0
b=1
print("Fibonacci number generator.")
stopNumber=input("How high do you want to go? If you want to go forever, put n.")
print(1)
while stopNumber=="n" or int(stopNumber) > a+b:
    a, b = b, a+b
    print(b)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I like how you used my existing code as opposed to rewriting it. –  JRickert Nov 7 '13 at 15:20

The same, working and using a little smarter techniques:

# returns generator
def fib(stop):
    prev, current = 0, 1
    while current < stop:  # a little hack here - python is ok comparing ints to floats
        yield current
        # multiple assginment - operands on the left are "frozen" just before theis instruction
        prev, current = current, prev + current 

# note inf - float('inf') results in "positive infinity" which is an appropriate math concept for "forever"
stop = float(input("How high do you want to go? If you want to go forever, put inf."))

for f in fib(stop):
    print (f)

Note: please don't try doing list(fib(float('inf'))) :)

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One little adjustment if I may. make stop optional and equal to None by default. if stop is not set, the while loop should run forever –  Samy Arous Nov 7 '13 at 14:33

The reason you are getting some higher values is because you are having a = a+b and b = b+a in a single loop. So when you are checking the values in while int(stopNumber) > a or int(stopNumber) > b: you get True and enter the loop but a = a+b and b = b+a can make the value of a and b greater than stopNumber and since you are printing it without checking it, you are getting some higher values. You should increment only once in the loop and if you write the print statement just after the while loop you will not get correct values

prev = 0                             
curr = 1
print("Fibonacci number generator.")
stopNumber = input("How high do you want to go? If you want to go forever, put n.")
if stopNumber == 'n':                    
    print(curr)                     
    curr = prev + curr
    prev = curr
else:
    while curr<stopNumber:
        print(curr)
        curr = prev + curr
        prev = curr

Note: The code will run forever if the input is n.

share|improve this answer
    
Never ever use the input statement, this is a call for an attack. and the algorithm should run forever if the input is 'n' not stop after one iteration. –  Samy Arous Nov 7 '13 at 14:31
    
@lcfseth: Yes I know it will run forever if the input is n. I just wanted to explain why he is getting larger values than stopNumber –  Ankur Ankan Nov 7 '13 at 14:34

You do the check if stopNumber > a or b, then you increment a and b, printing them. If you only wanted to print them if they were <= stopNumber than do something like this:

#Fibonacci number generator
a=0
b=1
print("Fibonacci number generator.")
stopNumber=input("How high do you want to go? If you want to go forever, put n.")
print(1)
while stopNumber=="n":
        a=a+b
        b=b+a
        print(a)
        print(b)
else:
    while True:
        a = a+b
        b = b+a
        if int(stopNumber) >= a:
           print(a)
        if int(stopNumber) >= b:
           print(b)
        else:
          break
share|improve this answer
def fib(n):
    if n == 0:
        return 0
    if n == 1:
        return 1
    return fib(n-1) + fib(n-2)

print("Fibonacci number generator.")
stopNumber=input("How high do you want to go? If you want to go forever, put n.")
if stopNumber == 'n':
    i=1
    while True:
        print 'Fibonacci #{0}: {1}'.format(i, fib(i))
        i=i+1
else:
    for i in range(1,int(n)):
        print 'Fibonacci #{0}: {1}'.format(i, fib(i))
share|improve this answer
    
The recursive fibonacci version is easy to understand but for complexity issues, should never used in real code. –  Samy Arous Nov 7 '13 at 14:28

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