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I am using Java.net at one of my project. and I wrote a App Server that gets inputStream from a client. But some times my (buffered)InputStream can not get all of OutputStream that client sent to my server. How can I write a wait or some thing like that, that my InputStream gets all of the OutputStream of client?

(My InputStream is not a String)

private Socket clientSocket;
private ServerSocket server;
private BufferedOutputStream outputS;
private BufferedInputStream inputS;
private InputStream inBS;
private OutputStream outBS;

server = new ServerSocket(30501, 100);
clientSocket = server.accept();

public void getStreamFromClient()  {
    try {
        outBS = clientSocket.getOutputStream();
        outputS = new BufferedOutputStream( outBS);
        outputS.flush();

        inBS = clientSocket.getInputStream();
        inputS = new BufferedInputStream( inBS );

    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem you have is related to TCP streaming nature.

The fact that you sent 100 Bytes (for example) from the server doesn't mean you will read 100 Bytes in the client the first time you read. Maybe the bytes sent from the server arrive in several TCP segments to the client.

You need to implement a loop in which you read until the whole message was received. Let me provide an example with DataInputStream instead of BufferedinputStream. Something very simple to give you just an exmaple.

Let's suppose you know beforehand the server is to send 100 Bytes of data.

In client you need to write:

byte[] messageByte = new byte[1000];
boolean end = false;
String dataString = "";

try 
{
    DataInputStream in = new DataInputStream(clientSocket.getInputStream());

    while(!end)
    {
        bytesRead = in.read(messageByte);
        messageString += new String(messageByte, 0, bytesRead);
        if (messageString.length == 100)
        {
            end = true;
        }
    }
    System.out.println("MESSAGE: " + messageString);
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    e.printStackTrace();
}

Now, typically the data size sent by one node (the server here) is not known beforehand. Then you need to define your own small protocol for the communication between server and client (or any two nodes) communicating with TCP.

The most common and simple is to define TLV: Type, lenght, Value. So you define that every message sent form server to client comes with: -1 Byte indicating type (For example, it could also be 2 or whatever). -1 Byte (or whatever) for length of message -N Bytes for the value (N is indicated in length).

So you know you have to receive a minimum of 2 Bytes and with the second Byte you know how many following Bytes you need to read.

This is just a suggestion of a possible protocol. You could also get rid of "Type".

So it would be something like:

byte[] messageByte = new byte[1000];
boolean end = false;
String dataString = "";

try 
{
    DataInputStream inputS = new DataInputStream(clientSocket.getInputStream());
    int bytesRead = 0;

    messageByte[0] = in.readByte();
    messageByte[1] = in.readByte();

    int bytesToRead = messageByte[1];

    while(!end)
    {
        bytesRead = in.read(messageByte);
        messageString += new String(messageByte, 0, bytesRead);
        if (messageString.length == bytesToRead )
        {
            end = true;
        }
    }
    System.out.println("MESSAGE: " + messageString);
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    e.printStackTrace();
}
share|improve this answer

You can read your BufferedInputStream like this. It will read data till it reaches end of stream which is indicated by -1.

inputS = new BufferedInputStream(inBS);
byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];    //If you handle larger data use a bigger buffer size
int read;
while((read = inputS.read(buffer)) != -1) {
    System.out.println(read);
    // Your code to handle the data
}
share|improve this answer
    
The println() doesn't print anything useful, and your code ignores the read count. –  EJP Nov 7 '13 at 20:38
1  
I was just showing how to read the entire input stream. println() is just a place holder here. The OP has not asked how to get the read count! If he understands how to read the entire stream, he will understand how to get the read count. –  Code.me Nov 8 '13 at 4:29

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