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Today I was learning about the left shift bit operator (<<). As I understand it the left shift bit operator moves bits to the left as specified. And also I know multiply by 2 for shifting. But I am confused, like what exactly is the meaning of "shifting bits" and why does the output differ when value is assigned with a different type?

When I call the function below, it gives output as System.out.println("b="+b); //Output: 0

And my question is: how does b become 0 and why is b typecasted?

public void leftshiftDemo()
{
    byte a=64,b;
    int i;
    i=a << 2;
    b=(byte)(a<<2);
    System.out.println("i="+i); //Output: 256    i.e 64*2^2
    System.out.println("b="+b); //Output: 0   how & why b is typecasted
}

Update (new doubt):

what does it mean "If you shift a 1 bit into high-order position (Bit 31 or 63), the value will become negative". eg.

public void leftshifHighOrder()
{
    int i;
    int num=0xFFFFFFE;

    for(i=0;i<4;i++)
    {
        num=num<<1;
        System.out.println(num);
        /*
         * Output:
         * 536870908
         * 1073741816
         * 2147483632
         * -32   //how this is -ve?
         */
    }
}
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"why is b typecasted" - you tell us! You wrote (byte) (a << 2). Why? –  Ingo Nov 7 '13 at 15:05
    
@Dann Then perhaps the author of that book wanted to demonstrate that, when casting an int to byte, the higher valued bits are just chopped off. That's why b is typecasted. To recognize this, it is enough to recall that 256 = 1 0000 0000 binary, and the cast keeps only the last 8 bits. –  Ingo Nov 7 '13 at 15:16
    
@Ingo i updated a new doubt above in my question. Please help me –  Ashutosh Nov 7 '13 at 18:09
    
@Danny, first: I am not "Sir", second: please read the answer from njzk2, he explains it. –  Ingo Nov 7 '13 at 18:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

When integers are casted to bytes in Java, only the lowest order bits are kept:

A narrowing conversion of a signed integer to an integral type T simply discards all but the n lowest order bits, where n is the number of bits used to represent type T. In addition to a possible loss of information about the magnitude of the numeric value, this may cause the sign of the resulting value to differ from the sign of the input value.

In this case the byte 64 has the following binary representation:

01000000

The shift operator promotes the value to int:

00000000000000000000000001000000

then left shifts it by 2 bits:

00000000000000000000000100000000

We then cast it back into a byte, so we discard all but the last 8 bits:

00000000

Thus the final byte value is 0. However, your integer keeps all the bits, so its final value is indeed 256.

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Thanks donating this answer ! i am trying to understand what you explained. Can you please give small small example? –  Ashutosh Nov 7 '13 at 15:06
    
1 doubt: you said The shift operator promotes the value to int: 00000000000000000000000001000000 this value came? –  Ashutosh Nov 7 '13 at 16:46
    
I'm not sure what you're asking, but for the purposes of the calculation the value was promoted. In the same way that int x = 2; int y = (int)(2 * 1.5); has an implicit promotion to double. –  Zong Zheng Li Nov 7 '13 at 16:56

In java, ints are signed. To represent that, the 2's complement is used. In this representation, any number that has its high-order bit set to 1 is negative (by definition).

Therefore, when you left-shift a 1 that is on the 31st bit (that is the one before last for an int), it becomes negative.

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Yep, the MSB is the sign bit. However, OP really should have asked a new question. –  Zong Zheng Li Nov 7 '13 at 18:15
    
in your answer you said when you left-shift a 1 that is on the 31st bit ,but what does it mean? –  Ashutosh Nov 7 '13 at 19:33
    
0100 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 that a 1 on the 31st bit. ` << 1` that's left-shift by 1. 1000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 that's the result. As you can see, the left most bit, which is the most significant bit, is a 1. That implies the value is negative. –  njzk2 Nov 7 '13 at 20:00
    
java integer = 32 bits –  njzk2 Nov 7 '13 at 20:32
    
Okay i got it. One more small doubt, as you said in your comment As you can see, the left most bit, which is the most significant bit, is a 1. That implies the value is negative How it implies the value is -ve if appear on the most significant bit? –  Ashutosh Nov 7 '13 at 20:56
i = a << 2;

in memory:

  • load a (8 bits) into regitry R1 (32 bits)
  • shift registry R1 to the left two position
  • assign registry R1 (32 bits) to variable i (32 bits).

b = (byte)(a << 2);

in memory:

  • load a (8 bits) into regitry R1 (32 bits)
  • shift registry R1 to the left two position
  • assign registry R1 (32 bits) to variable b (8 bits). <- this is why cast (byte) is necessary and why they get only the last 8 bits of the shift operation
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The exact meaning of shifting bits is exactly what it sounds like. :-) You shift them to the left.

0011 = 3

0011 << 1 = 0110

0110 = 6

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You should read about different data types and their ranges in Java.

Let me explain in easy terms.

byte a=64,b;
int i;
i=a << 2;
b=(byte)(a<<2);

'byte' in Java is signed 2's complement integer. It can store values from -128 to 127 both inclusive. When you do this,

i = a << 2;

you are left shifting 'a' by 2 bits and the value is supposed to be 64*2*2 = 256. 'i' is of type 'int' and 'int' in Java can represent that value.

When you again left shift and typecast,

b=(byte)(a<<2);

you keep your lower 8 bits and hence the value is 0.

You can read this for different primitive types in Java. http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/nutsandbolts/datatypes.html

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