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The Situation

Lets say I have a directive, that has to access certain elements via ID, inside the element on which the directive is defined. The problem, that can occur, is that by the time the directive is evaluated, the child-elements are not yet. The result is, that I'm not able to access those elements by their ID.

Example

FIDDLE

<div ng-controller="MyCtrl">
  <div color="elementId">
      <div ng-repeat="item in items" id="{{ item.id }}">
          {{ item.name }}
      </div>
  </div>
</div>

<script>
    var myApp = angular.module('myApp',[]);

    myApp.directive("color", function () {
        return {
            restrict: "A",   
            link: function (scope, element, attributes) {

                var name = attributes.color,
                    el = element[0];

                scope.$watch(name, function () {
                    var id = scope[name];
                    console.log(id); //id1
                    console.log(element.children().eq(0).attr("id")); //{{ item.id }}
                    element.find("#"+id).css("background-color","red");
                });
            }        
        };
    });

    function MyCtrl($scope) {
        $scope.items = [
            { id:"id1", name:"item1" },
            { id:"id2", name:"item2" }
        ];

        $scope.elementId="id1";
    }

</script>

So my directive should just paint the background-color of the element with the id in $scope.elementId. (Btw. I know I can handle this simple example much easier, it should just illustrate the general issue). The problem is, that the ids of the elements inside ng-repeat are not there yet. As pointed out in the comment in the code, the id is still "{{ item.id }}". So angular didn't evaluate this part yet.

Question

My obvious question is now: how can I make my directive to wait for descendent elements to be completely evaluated?

Further Explaination

In my real application I want to have a directive, that enables me to scroll to a certain elements on the page. I also use a pagination directive to split up the elements I want to show. Because of the pagination, only the elements that are really visible, are in the DOM, so the invisible elements are already filtered out in my controller.

I also have a sidebar, where are small links to ALL the elements (not only the visible ones). When someone clicks on an element in the sidebar, two events should occur:

  1. jump to the correct page
  2. scroll to the corrent element

When I jump to the page, I basically have the situation, I described above. I have a complete new list of elements, that have to be processed by ng-repeat. But directly after that, I try to tell my scroll-directive, that it should scroll the element with the ID "xy", but this ID is not assigned yet.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

Wrap your $scope.elementId = "Id1" with $timeout to notify angular to call listeners. (this can alternatively be done with $scope.$apply(), but it's causing another issue here)

here is the jsfiddle link

Code is -

    var myApp = angular.module('myApp',[]);

    myApp.directive("color", ['$timeout',  function ($timeout) {
        return {
            restrict: "A",   
            link: function (scope, element, attributes) {
                console.log(element)
                var name = attributes.color,
                    el = element[0];

                 scope.$watch(name, function () {
                     var id = scope[name];
                     console.log(id); //id1
                     console.log(element.find("#"+id)); //{{ item.id }}
                     element.find("#"+id).css("background-color","red");
                 });
            }        
        };
    }]);

myApp.controller("MyCtrl", function($scope, $timeout) {
    $scope.items = [
        { id:"id1", name:"item1" },
        { id:"id2", name:"item2" }
    ];

    $timeout(function() {
        $scope.elementId="id1";
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
That would certainly work in many cases, but I was really hoping to manage this without a timeout. I always feel too unreliable. –  basilikum Nov 7 '13 at 23:00
    
As link function is called only after the dom creation of the particular directive's template, I think it should be fine. I doubt why it doesn't work without $timeout though. –  Prasad Nov 8 '13 at 13:24
    
I've got the problem now. When the elementId is assigned a value, we should notify angular to call its listeners. You can do it by wrapping $scope.elementId = Id1 around $timeout. I've modified the fiddle link and updated the main answer also - jsfiddle.net/jcPS6/4 –  Prasad Nov 8 '13 at 13:35
    
This looks really interesting! I have never read about $timeout notifying some listeners. Do you have a source for this? I mean your fiddle seems to work but I kind of doubt that angular knows, because of the timeout, to wait for the element with this specific id to show up. Anyway +1! –  basilikum Nov 8 '13 at 14:02
    
Yes, Read this - jimhoskins.com/2012/12/17/angularjs-and-apply.html. We should actually use $scope.$apply(), not $timeout! –  Prasad Nov 8 '13 at 14:34

If finally ended up writing a getElementById helper function, that returns a promise and has an internal interval, that check every 100ms if the element is present or not:

updated Fiddle

function getElementById(elementId) {
    var deferred = $q.defer(),
        intervalKey,
        counter = 0, 
        maxIterations = 50;

    intervalKey = setInterval(function () {
        var element = document.getElementById(elementId);
        if (element) {
            deferred.resolve(element);
            clearInterval(intervalKey);
        } else if (counter >= maxIterations) {
            deferred.reject("no element found");
            clearInterval(intervalKey);
        }
        counter++;
    }, 100);

    return deferred.promise;
}

In my given example, I would use it like this:

getElementById(id).then(function (element) {
    $(element).css("background-color","red");
}, function (message) {
    console.log(message);
});

It's still not my preferred solution, but it works and solves my problem for now. But I'm still curious, if there is any better approach to this.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think it's the problem with element not being rendered as the link function is called after the dom is rendered (you can also see it the console that element is exist in your example) . Even if you do this, second time you want to change the elementId to "id2" and expect it be colored, it may not work. I've faced this issue recently. Try one use case - send an ajax request and change the elementId and you will see that new element is not colored. –  Prasad Nov 8 '13 at 14:02
    
Why wouldn't it work? If I don't change the DOM, but only the value of elementId, then it should find my element on the first iteration, because it is already loaded? I already implemented this method in my application for testing. So far it didn't fail. Of course, there is always the off chance that it might take more than 50 iterations (which is 5 seconds). This is what I don't like about timeouts / intervals. But on the other hand, it should never take 5 seconds to do what I do in my app. –  basilikum Nov 8 '13 at 14:11
    
At least it does the job :) –  Benjamin Toueg Feb 23 at 3:08
1  
I agree with @basilikum, it does work, but I'd also like to know how to do this without deferreds. I had this problem, my case is - load the directive, wait for attributes to be evaluated before executing. –  Elise Chant May 7 at 21:58

You should complete the directive including a controller option.

controller: function ($scope){
     $scope.items = [
        { id:"id1", name:"item1" },
        { id:"id2", name:"item2" }
    ];
}

This will create everything in the controller scope, and then you can access it from the controller of the view that uses this directive.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm...I'm not sure how this would help. The directive also shouldn't know about the items. It should just have knowledge of the id of the element, which it should color. –  basilikum Nov 7 '13 at 16:22

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