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As you've probably figured out from the topic, I'm pretty noob. Anyways, I have a problem with calling a function from inside another function, as Python just seems to ignore the call.

This is an if from inside my function y:

if clas == "warrior":
    strenght, toughness = warrior()
    print "Your strenght is %d." % strenght
    print "Your toughness is %d." % toughness
    return strenght, toughness
    warrior_journey()

I use return here to assign those values to the global variables, outside my y function block:

char_str, char_tough = character()

Now my y function calls warrior() without any problems, but ignores warrior_journey(), just prints strenght, toughness and then ends. It probably has to do with return, but I can't find anything useful on this.

Here's the whole "y" or "character" function code:

def character():
name = raw_input("Welcome, please give the name of your character:\n> ")
if name.isalpha() == True and len(name) != 0 and len(name) != 1:
    print "Welcome again %s!" % name
else:
    exit("This isn't a proper name")
clas = raw_input("Great, now choose your class (warrior, rogue, thief):\n> ").lower()
if "warrior" in clas or "rogue" in clas or "thief" in clas:
    print "Your class is %s." % clas
else:
    exit("You have only three choices listed above, read them again")
if clas == "warrior":
    strenght, toughness = warrior()
    print "Your strenght is %d." % strenght
    print "Your toughness is %d." % toughness
    warrior_journey()
    return strenght, toughness
elif clas == "rogue":
    strenght, toughness = rogue()
    print "Your strenght is %d, and your toughness is %d." % (strenght, toughness)
    return strenght, toughness
elif clas == "thief":
    strenght, toughness = thief()
    print "Your strenght is %d, and your toughness is %d." % (strenght, toughness)
    return strenght, toughness 

then, ouside, I've got:

char_str, char_though = character()

and even further the problematic function warrior_journey:

def warrior_journey():
    print "You wake hangovered in the woods, sun rays dancing on your face"
    print "as you regain parts of your consciousness you notice that, happily, your weapon is still at your side"
    print "You have an open world before you, in which direction do you stumble (north, south, east, west)?"
    direction = raw_input("> ").lower()
    if direction == "north" or direction == "n":
        warrior_north()
    elif direction == "south" or direction == "s":
        warrior_south()
    elif direction == "east" or direction == "e":
        warrior_east()
    elif direction == "west" or direction == "w":
        warrior_west()
    else:
        print "This is not a valid direction, perhaps you should sleep some more."

It's still 'wip' so the warrior_journey doesn't return anything or sent to another function but it still should be at least printed by the call in "character" function, shouldn't it?

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1  
We don't. We do it the rigth way. :) –  Matthias Nov 7 '13 at 16:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You wrote a statement after the return statement. So this means that it will be ignored because Python will return to your global variable immidiately. Statements after a return statement in the same function are always inaccessible. Move the function call warrior_journey() one statement lower than your global variable, so this variable got the returned values before calling warrior_journey().

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I moved the function "warrior_journey" before "character" function with the call to it that followed and it now works. Thanks! –  user2965473 Nov 7 '13 at 17:01

You are returning before you make the function call to warrior_journey(). Once a functionreturns, it stops execution of that function, so you are never calling warrior_journey(). Try

warrior_journey()
return strenght, toughness
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I've tried that already, and it gives me two errors instead of stopping the function: one is NameError: global name "warrior_journey" is not defined, the other is char_str, char_tough = character() –  user2965473 Nov 7 '13 at 16:03
    
Hmm, it sounds like there might be an issue with how you call y. Can you post your code for whichever function calls y? –  mdml Nov 7 '13 at 16:05
    
Function y (="character" in my code) is only called by character() and char_str, char_tough = character. Function warrior_journey() which I try to call from inside it is just simple printing, if-else code. –  user2965473 Nov 7 '13 at 16:18
    
Okay, please update your post with your code and traceback (or ask a new question), since I can only speculate about the issue without seeing everything together. –  mdml Nov 7 '13 at 16:21

return returns from the function, meaning its execution is stopped. You have to put the return statement at the end of the function.

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  1. As other mentioned your return is stopping the execution before your warrior_journey() call. If you are getting NameError: global name "warrior_journey" is not defined you need to look into the definition of your warrior_journey function.

  2. As for the other error.

    char_str, char_tough = character()
    

    This does not assign values to global variables, but to local variables named the same. To set the global variables from inside your function you need to use the global keyword.

    global char_str, char_tough
    char_str, char_tough = character()
    
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As already said, 'return' returns to the caller, stopping the execution of the function.

I add that you can inspect this and other issues via a debugging method.

The simplest (and hard) way is to add 'print' sttements to your code to highlight its flow:

print 1
if clas == "warrior":
    print 2
    strenght, toughness = warrior()
    print 3
    print "Your strenght is %d." % strenght
    print 4
    print "Your toughness is %d." % toughness
    print 5
    return strenght, toughness
    print 6
    warrior_journey()
    print 7

If you run this piece of code you'll see that numbering will stop at 5, just before returning...

1
2
3
4
5

Next debug step could be pdb, then something embedded in your IDE (e.g. PyDev on Eclipse)

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