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Scenario (see code below for reference):

  1. The original (Base) implementation must have func1() returning a list. Internally it makes calls to merge and splice.
  2. The subsequent (Derived) implementation must have func1() returning a vector. It needs random access.
  3. func2() is common to both implementations and simply needs a forward iterator.

    #include <iostream>
    #include <list>
    #include <vector>
    
    
    class Base {
    protected:
        virtual void func1(std::list<int>& l /* out parameter */) {
            // This must use list. Calls merge and splice.
            std::cout << "list version of func1 in base\n";
        }
    
        virtual void func1(std::vector<int>& v) {
            // This should never be called, but code won't compile without it.
            std::cout << "vector version of func1 in base\n";
        }
    
        template <class T> void func2(T container) {
            typename T::const_iterator it = container.cbegin();
            // Iterate and perform work. Common to both Base and Derived.
            std::cout << "func2 in base\n";
        }
    
        template <class T> void processHelper() {
            T container;
            func1(container);
            func2<T>(container);
        }
    
    public:
        virtual void process() {
            processHelper<std::list<int> >();
        }
    
    };
    
    class Derived : public Base {
    protected:
        virtual void func1(std::vector<int>& v /* out parameter */) {
            // This must use a random access container.
            std::cout << "Vector version of func1 in derived\n";
        }
    
    public:
        virtual void process() {
            processHelper<std::vector<int> >();
        }
    };
    
    int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
    {
        std::vector<int> var;
        Derived der;
        der.process();
    
        //std::list<int> var;
        //Base bs;
        //bs.process();
    
        std::cout << "done\n";
    }
    

Goals:

  1. No (or minimal) duplication (cut and paste) of code.
  2. Avoid compiling with Boost. (Haven't needed it yet. Don't want to for this.) This rules out a couple of any_iterator implementations.

Question:

Is there a better OO design in C++ to achieve what I am doing? I have reasons for not wanting to turn my list into a vector or vice versa before returning from func1(). Specifically, the list is large at this point and I'd prefer to not incur the extra copy. I could have designed the func1()'s to return an opaque_iterator http://www.mr-edd.co.uk/code/opqit but was hesitant to bring in an unknown header file.

In any case, the question took on an academic life of it's own. This problem is so easy in Java since the collections implement common interfaces, but seems challenging in C++. Particularly bothered by the ugliness of having to implement Base::func1(std::vector& v) just to get the code to compile even though there's no execution path that will ever call this function. Hoping there's an easier way and I'm just not seeing a more straightforward solution.

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3 Answers 3

The C++ way is working with iterators. You can do pretty much anything with the standard algorithms. The library is on intentionally separated on Containers <--> Iterators <--> Algorithms

Containers define iterators (that are basically glorified pointers) and algorithms work with iterators. Containers and algorithms are unkown to each other.

Normally you would pass a couple of iterators (usually container.begin() and container.end()) and the algorithm will be implemented in terms of those.

Have a look at the standard algorithms and see if you can come up with a solution on what you want to do. To do that your function should be templated on iterators rather than on containers.

Hope that helps.

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The generic way would be to have func1 take an output iterator:

template<class OutputIterator> void func1(OutputIterator &&out) {
    :

You then call it with a back_insert_iterator on the container you want to use for output:

std::list<int> tmp;
obj->func1(std::back_inserter(tmp));
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I ended up finding lots of questions along the same lines, some on Stack Overflow. So maybe this is a duplicate. If so, apologies. Here are some relevant links:

How to write a function that takes an iterator or collection in a generic way?

Generic iterator

http://www.artima.com/cppsource/type_erasure.html

I ended up going with a simple type erasure approach modeled after this article: http://www.cplusplus.com/articles/oz18T05o/ I can't claim to understand everything that's going on here, but it does work. The only downside is that I had to wrap the iterator API in my Container class and return all primitives and well-known classes rather than just expose the underlying iterator directly. So my Container wrapper is not very reusable.

I have posted the code I wrote below in the hope that it will be useful to someone else:

    #include <iostream>
    #include <list>
    #include <vector>

    // Type erasure for returning different std containers based off of: http://www.cplusplus.com/articles/oz18T05o/
    class Container {
    protected:
        class IContainer {
        public:
            virtual ~IContainer() {}

            virtual void setBegin() = 0;
            virtual bool isEnd() = 0;
            virtual int get() = 0;
            virtual void next() = 0;
        };

        template <typename T> class ContainerModel : public IContainer {
        public:
            ContainerModel(const T& container_) : m_container(container_) {}
            virtual ~ContainerModel() {}

            virtual void setBegin() {
                m_cit = m_container.cbegin();
            }
            virtual bool isEnd() {
                return (m_cit == m_container.cend());
            }
            virtual int get() {
                return *m_cit;
            }
            virtual void next() {
                ++m_cit;
            }

        protected:
            T m_container;
            typename T::const_iterator m_cit;
        };

        std::shared_ptr<IContainer> m_spContainer;

    public:
        template <typename T> Container(const T& t_) : m_spContainer(new ContainerModel<T>(t_)) {}
        virtual ~Container() {}

        virtual void setBegin() {
            m_spContainer->setBegin();
        }
        virtual bool isEnd() {
            return m_spContainer->isEnd();
        }
        virtual int get() {
            return m_spContainer->get();
        }
        virtual void next() {
            m_spContainer->next();
        }
    };

    class Base {
    protected:
        virtual Container func1() {
            std::cout << "list version of func1 in base\n";
            std::list<int> l;
            // Do lots of stuff with lists. merge(), splice(), etc.
            return Container(l);
        }

        virtual void func2(const Container& container) {
            // Iterate using setBegin(), get(), next() and isEnd() functions.
            std::cout << "func2 in base\n";
        }

    public:
        virtual void process() {
            Container container = func1();
            func2(container);
        }

    };

    class Derived : public Base {
    protected:
        virtual Container func1() {
            std::cout << "Vector version of func1 in derived\n";
            std::vector<int> v;
            // Do lots of stuff with vector's random access iterator.
            return Container(v);
        }
    };

    int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
    {
        Derived der;
        der.process();

        //Base bs;
        //bs.process();

        std::cout << "done\n";
    }
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