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I am working on a code and decided to add support for scalar types, to be able to switch between std::complex<double> and plain double. I have all of the number crunching written and I templated it with a template <typename Scalar> approach.

My "problem" is that for the complex case I would need to provide some additional methods that in real case do not have sense and cannot be coded.

My previous approach was to create a base class template, that implemented everything common. Then I have a concrete class which derives from this base class, with as the Scalar template argument std::complex<double>. Then I have kind of a template proxy/dummy class that behaves as a switch between the double version and std::complex<double>. It looks more or less like below.

//base stuff
template<typename Scalar>
class NumberCruncherBase{
 Scalar stuff1();
 Scalar stuff2();
 Scalar stuff3();
}

//inherit base stuff and extend it
class NumberCruncherComplex : public NumberCruncherBase< std::complex<double> >{
 std::complex<double> extra_stuff1();
}

//switch proxy
template<typename Scalar>
class NumberCruncher : public NumberCruncherBase<Scalar> {}

//specialization for complex to explicitly derive from the extension
//in case of complex
template<>
class NumberCruncher< std::complex<double> > : public NumberCruncherBase< std::complex<double> > {}

Surprisingly or not this approach works kinda good. You can derive from NumberCruncher or directly from the concrete specialized type. It is also possible to provide NumberCRuncherReal for consisency but it would be kind of meaningless.

However, this is kind of cumbersome to code and it feels bloated with repeated code. I need to provide wrappers for every kind of ctor I have in Base class.

I recently came upon boost's enable_if which seems to do what I need. But I can't get it to work. I tired:

 const Matrix op_My( typename enable_if<boost::is_complex<Scalar> >::type* dummy = 0 ) { return g*H_sum_S[2]; };

This is a line in a class declaration, g++ says:

 error:   expected a constant of type ‘bool’, got ‘boost::is_complex<Scalar>’

My question is, is this a good technique to achieve what I am after? and how should I write it. I tried to follow http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_54_0/libs/utility/enable_if.html. I use gcc 4.8.1.

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If you don't mind introducing a "negative variability", enable_if/disable_if is ok. As for the error, try using fully qualified boost::enable_if. Note that op_My should be a template having Scalar argument. –  Igor R. Nov 7 '13 at 18:27
1  
"I need to provide wrappers for every kind of ctor I have in Base class" Not in C++11 you don't. –  Igor Tandetnik Nov 7 '13 at 19:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The specific error you get is because enable_if takes a bool as the first argument, but you pass it a type.

boost::is_complex<Scalar> // <- this is a type 

To get the bool value (true/false) you need to write:

boost::is_complex<Scalar>::value // <- this is a bool value telling whether Scalar is complex

The is_complex struct inherits from true_type or false_type (depending on the type of Scalar), look them up if you want to know how it works in more detail ;)

There are other problems with your code though. The enable_if needs to depend on template parameter first known when the function is called and not a class template parameter. You could do something like this:

template<typename Scalar> 
class matrix
{
//...
   public:
   // print function that will be called for a matrix of complex numbers
   template<typename T=Scalar
          , typename std::enable_if<boost::is_complex<T>::value,int>::type = 0
          >
   void print() const;

   // print function that will be called for a matrix of non-complex numbers
   template<typename T=Scalar
          , typename std::enable_if<!boost::is_complex<T>::value,int>::type = 0
          >
   void print() const;
   //...
};

This will produce a "switch" that picks the appropriate class method based on class template parameters. I chose by convention to put the enable_if in the template parameters instead of in the function signature. I find this a more general solution, and more readable.

Whether or not this is the "best" way to provide this feature, I don't know (can't on the the top of my head think of any major drawbacks), but it'll do the trick. Hope it helps :)

Edit 08/11/13:

I use the specific kind of enable_if structure, because it allows me to have an enable_if switch between two functions which would otherwise have the exact same signature. One of the "usual" ways of using enable_if is to use the result of enable_if as a default value for a template parameter, like this:

template<typename Scalar> 
class matrix
{
//...
   public:
   // print function that will be called for a matrix of complex numbers
   template<typename T=Scalar
          , class = typename std::enable_if<boost::is_complex<T>::value>::type // enable_if is used to give default type for the class template
          >
   void print() const; 

   // print function that will be called for a matrix of non-complex numbers
   template<typename T=Scalar
          , class = typename std::enable_if<!boost::is_complex<T>::value>::type // same as above
          >
   void print() const; //<- this has same function signature as the above print()
                       //   we get a compiler error
   //...
};

The compiler can't distinguish the two print functions from each other, as they both are templated in the same way, and have the same signature, as they are both seen as

template<typename T, typename U>
void print() const;

In my example the compiler doesn't know how the function is templated as this is dictated by the result of enable_if

template<typename T, ?>
void print() const;

and can thus first see the function signature when the function gets called and the enable_if get evaluated. I chose int by convention, but you can also use void*:

typename std::enable_if<!boost::is_complex<T>::value,void*>::type = nullptr

with void* instead of int, but not just void, as we cannot have a void non-type template parameter.

To do what you want to do, you need to provide a non-templated function in your derived class to override the abstract function in the base class. For this you could use indirection and do something like:

class matrix_base
{
   public:
      virtual void print() const = 0;
};

template<typename Scalar>
class matrix: matrix_base
{
   //...
   private:
      // print function that will be called for a matrix of complex numbers
      template<typename T=Scalar
             , typename std::enable_if<boost::is_complex<T>::value,int>::type = 0
             >
      void print_impl() const;

      // print function that will be called for a matrix of non-complex numbers
      template<typename T=Scalar
             , typename std::enable_if<!boost::is_complex<T>::value,int>::type = 0
             >
      void print_impl() const;

   public:
      // print function that will override abstract print in base class
      void print() const { print_impl(); } // <- redirect to one of the print_impl() functions

      //...
};

The downside of this approach is that you need to provide a print_impl() implementation for every possible matrix type, i.e. you cannot just have a print_impl() for complex numbers, you also need to provide one for non-complex numbers.

Hope this made some things clearer :)

share|improve this answer
    
Could you please explain why the second argument in enable_if is int? Also, I am curious when this member get instantiated. I work on a class that derives from NumberCruncher class. When the Scalar is std::complex I get error that my op_My aka. extra_stuff1 is pure virtual, but if it gets created upon call, and not upon class instantiation then it's expected. I wanted to use enable_if to work with my previous approach but it might be impossible. –  luk32 Nov 8 '13 at 7:46

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