Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am running OpenModelica and trying to run an example from Introduction to Physical Modeling with Modelica. I have copied examples 9.1 - 9.4 into a package. The file now looks like this:

    package gravityPackage
  //Test of gravity taken from Intro to Physical modeling with Modelica
  //
  //
  //
  //
  //
  model ParticleField
    inner function gravity = TwoBodyField;
    Particle p1(x_init = {2,-2,0}, v_init = {0.7,0,0});
    Particle p2(x_init = {0,0.5,0}, v_init = {-1,-1,0});
    Particle p3(x_init = {0.5,2,0}, v_init = {-1,-0.5,0});
  end ParticleField;
  function TwoBodyField
    extends GravityField;
  protected
    Modelica.SIunits.Position b1[3],b2[3];
    Modelica.SIunits.Velocity n1[3],n2[3];
  algorithm
    b1:={0,0,0};
    b2:={0,1,0};
    n1:=-(x - b1) / sqrt((x - b1) * (x - b1));
    n2:=-(x - b2) / sqrt((x - b2) * (x - b2));
    g:=n1 / ((x - b1) * (x - b1)) + n2 / ((x - b2) * (x - b2));
  end TwoBodyField;
  partial function GravityField
    input Modelica.SIunits.Position x[3];
    output Modelica.SIunits.Acceleration g[3];
  end GravityField;
  model Particle
    parameter Modelica.SIunits.Position x_init[3];
    parameter Modelica.SIunits.Velocity v_init[3];
  protected
    outer function gravity = GravityField;
    //outer function gravity=ParticleField;
    //outer function gravity=TwoBodyField;
    Modelica.SIunits.Position x[3](start = x_init);
    Modelica.SIunits.Velocity v[3](start = v_init);
    Modelica.SIunits.Acceleration a[3];
  equation
    v = der(x);
    a = der(v);
    a = gravity(x);
  end Particle;
end gravityPackage;

But, if I go to OMShell and try to run it, I get this:

    >> loadFile("gravityPackage.mo")
true


>> simulate(gravityPackage.ParticleField) 
record SimulationResult
    resultFile = "",
    simulationOptions = "startTime = 0.0, stopTime = 1.0, numberOfIntervals = 500, tolerance = 0.000001, method = 'dassl', fileNamePrefix = 'gravityPackage.ParticleField', options = '', outputFormat = 'mat', variableFilter = '.*', measureTime = false, cflags = '', simflags = ''",
    messages = "Simulation failed for model: gravityPackage.ParticleField
[gravityPackage.mo:34:11-34:42:writable] Warning: No corresponding 'inner' declaration found for class gravity declared as 'outer '.
 Continuing flattening by only considering the 'outer' class declaration.
[gravityPackage.mo:43:5-43:19:writable] Error: Failed to instantiate equation 
a = gravity(x);.
Error: Error occurred while flattening model gravityPackage.ParticleField
",
    timeFrontend = 0.0,
    timeBackend = 0.0,
    timeSimCode = 0.0,
    timeTemplates = 0.0,
    timeCompile = 0.0,
    timeSimulation = 0.0,
    timeTotal = 0.0
end SimulationResult;

>> 

So, clearly there is something related to scope that I am not getting correct. All the code, except for the package, is just copied directly from the book. I believe that the package is necessary to get it into a single file (although I tried a few other ways to do that with no success). Any suggestions are appreciated.

Thanks,

share|improve this question
    
Hi @Adam, I want to start learning modellica, is this book you are talking about freely available as an ebook by any chance? –  Jonny Oct 5 at 19:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is a bug in OpenModelica. It should work fine if is a inner component or class but not for functions.

I added a bug report about it and we will fix it: https://trac.openmodelica.org/OpenModelica/ticket/2467

For now you can use an inner/outer package, that should work fine.

package gravityPackage

package Functions
  function TwoBodyField
    extends GravityField;
  protected
    Modelica.SIunits.Position b1[3],b2[3];
    Modelica.SIunits.Velocity n1[3],n2[3];
  algorithm
    b1:={0,0,0};
    b2:={0,1,0};
    n1:=-(x - b1) / sqrt((x - b1) * (x - b1));
    n2:=-(x - b2) / sqrt((x - b2) * (x - b2));
    g:=n1 / ((x - b1) * (x - b1)) + n2 / ((x - b2) * (x - b2));
  end TwoBodyField;

  partial function GravityField
    input Modelica.SIunits.Position x[3];
    output Modelica.SIunits.Acceleration g[3];
  end GravityField;

end Functions;

model ParticleField
    inner package funcs = Functions;
    Particle p1(x_init = {2,-2,0}, v_init = {0.7,0,0});
    Particle p2(x_init = {0,0.5,0}, v_init = {-1,-1,0});
    Particle p3(x_init = {0.5,2,0}, v_init = {-1,-0.5,0});
  end ParticleField;

  model Particle
    parameter Modelica.SIunits.Position x_init[3];
    parameter Modelica.SIunits.Velocity v_init[3];
  protected
    outer package funcs = Functions;
    function gravity = funcs.TwoBodyField;
    //outer function gravity=ParticleField;
    //outer function gravity=TwoBodyField;
    Modelica.SIunits.Position x[3](start = x_init);
    Modelica.SIunits.Velocity v[3](start = v_init);
    Modelica.SIunits.Acceleration a[3];
  equation
    v = der(x);
    a = der(v);
    a = gravity(x);
  end Particle;

end gravityPackage;
share|improve this answer

OK, so I think the issue here is that you are trying to "pass" a function up the instance tree using dynamic scoping (i.e. inner and outer). I haven't read the specification on this particular point, but I don't think this will work. The reason is that normally inner and outer are used in conjunction with things that are instantiated (variables, models, etc).

So the thing to understand is that conceptually both constant variables and function definitions are not instantiated. Being able to treat a function as an instance (a first-class value) has several useful consequences but it also introduces some semantic complications. There has been work done in recent versions of the language toward trying to treat functions as first class citizens. The main use case was to pass functions as arguments to other functions. But I think these new semantics stop short of making functions truly first class values (as your example would demonstrate). However, this may be in issue with OpenModelica. I can't say definitively.

One way you could deal with this would be to use replaceable and redeclare. So in your Particle model, define gravity like this:

public
  replaceable function gravity = GravityField;

Then, instantiate it as follows:

model ParticleField
  Particle p1(x_init = {2,-2,0}, v_init = {0.7,0,0}, redeclare function gravity = TwoBodyField);
  Particle p2(x_init = {0,0.5,0}, v_init = {-1,-1,0}, redeclare function gravity = TwoBodyField);
  Particle p3(x_init = {0.5,2,0}, v_init = {-1,-0.5,0}, redeclare function gravity = TwoBodyField);
end ParticleField;

Note, I haven't tested this solution. For example, your Particle model might require the partial qualifier (since you would have to override gravity to a non-partial implementation).

I hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Adrian presents an alternative with packages. However, I want to add one additional comment. Personally, I try to avoid inner and outer. Using redeclarations is much more flexible. For example, you have the option to specify different functions to different particles. For this example, that may not make sense but in many cases it does. –  Michael Tiller Nov 8 '13 at 3:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.