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I am trying to use Access to go through a large database of mailing addresses, and I'm looking to generate a report that looks at all of the mailing addresses that are identical, and then looks for zip codes that do not match. Ideally, I would like to use this same method to check Names vs Mailing Addresses, Mailing Addresses vs Names, etc.

The goal is to clean up the database and drastically reduce postage.

I had thought this was going to be fairly simple, but I haven't come up with a way to do it yet, and I haven't found anything online that tells me anyone else has done this.

My current attempt looks like this: but it is returning zero results.

SELECT [Permissive Export_OLD 1].ACCOUNTNO, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].KEYNO, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].NAME1, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].NAME2, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].ADDRESS1, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].ADDRESS2, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].CITY, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].STATE, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].ZIPCODE
FROM [Permissive Export_OLD 1]
WHERE ((([Permissive Export_OLD 1].ADDRESS2)="EQUAL") AND (Not ([Permissive Export_OLD 1].ZIPCODE)="EQUAL"))
GROUP BY [Permissive Export_OLD 1].ACCOUNTNO, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].KEYNO, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].NAME1, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].NAME2, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].ADDRESS1, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].ADDRESS2, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].CITY, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].STATE, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].ZIPCODE;
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please show us what you tried till now –  mucio Nov 7 '13 at 16:42
    
Can you give us a quick overview of the fields involved and an example of a case where things do match and where they don't match per your criteria? I'm imagining it would be something like SELECT tblAddresses.ID, tblAddresses_1.ID FROM tblAddresses, tblAddresses As tblAddresses_1 WHERE (tblAddresses.MailingAddress = tblAddresses_1.MailingAddress) AND (tblAddresses.ZipCode <> tblAddresses_1.ZipCode). –  Blackhawk Nov 7 '13 at 16:56
    
Blackhawk, The database is really pretty big. What I was hoping to do was grab all of the necessary fields into one table and work from there. I figured once I get the logic for one, I can do the others. Here are the relevant fields. [tablename].NAME1, [tablename].NAME2, [tablename].ADDRESS1, [tablename].ADDRESS2, [tablename].CITY, [tablename].STATE, [tablename].ZIP –  user2965675 Nov 7 '13 at 17:08
    
So every row in the table has ACCOUNTNO, KEYNO, NAME1, NAME2, ADDRESS1, ADDRESS2, CITY, STATE, ZIPCODE? What you want to know is, for rows where ADDRESS1 is equal to ADDRESS2, is the ZIPCODE valid? –  Blackhawk Nov 7 '13 at 18:18
    
I'm actually looking ADDRESS2=ADDRESS2. ADDRESS1 is only used for attn and care of, which I did not make clear. So.. Where ADDRESS2=ADDRESS2, and the ZIPCODE field does not match. For Example: Say I have 123 Main St with a zip of 12345 in multiple records. If I have an instance of 123 Main St and a zip that is different, say 12344, I want the query to return this, then I can use this data to figure out which one is correct. –  user2965675 Nov 7 '13 at 18:37
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I recommend the following query:

SELECT [Permissive Export_OLD 1].ACCOUNTNO, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].KEYNO, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].NAME1, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].NAME2, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].ADDRESS1, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].ADDRESS2, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].CITY, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].STATE, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].ZIPCODE
FROM [Permissive Export_OLD 1], [Permissive Export_OLD 1] AS [Permissive Export_OLD 1_1]
WHERE ((([Permissive Export_OLD 1].ADDRESS2)=[Permissive Export_OLD 1_1].[ADDRESS2]) AND (([Permissive Export_OLD 1].ZIPCODE)<>[Permissive Export_OLD 1_1].[ZIPCODE]))
GROUP BY [Permissive Export_OLD 1].ACCOUNTNO, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].KEYNO, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].NAME1, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].NAME2, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].ADDRESS1, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].ADDRESS2, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].CITY, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].STATE, [Permissive Export_OLD 1].ZIPCODE;

This query compares each row in the table against every other row in the table to find ADDRESS2=ADDRESS2 but ZIPCODE<>ZIPCODE. The query will return all records which fit that criteria as separate rows.

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Blackhawk, Thank you for your time and effort. I think this is going to work out better than our current solution. –  user2965675 Nov 7 '13 at 21:16
    
@user2965675 Thank you for being very responsive and for the effort you put into finding the solution on your own! It means a lot to SO users when you demonstrate that you aren't just interested in a quick copy paste, but actually learning and understanding. –  Blackhawk Nov 7 '13 at 22:21
    
Blackhawk, It's my problem, so I should put in more effort! I truly do appreciate you taking the time to help me out. –  user2965675 Nov 8 '13 at 15:44
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Have you considered an address correction service like what SmartyStreets offers? (I work at SmartyStreets.)

Finding duplicate addresses is exceptionally tricky without putting them through a validation and standardization service. Such services can handle mis-spellings, addresses in different formats, etc. Your query expects the same addresses to be exactly equal and won't match "123 Main" with "123 Main St" even though they're the same.

And since these services tend to be CASS-Certified, assuming you have any US addresses, you'll get a CASS Summary Report which you present at the post office for lower mailing rates.

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I work for a local government agency, they won't pay. –  user2965675 Nov 7 '13 at 17:10
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