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I am using perfmon windows utility to debug memory leak in a process.

Perfmon explaination:

Working Set- Working Set is the current size, in bytes, of the Working Set of this process. The Working Set is the set of memory pages touched recently by the threads in the process. If free memory in the computer is above a threshold, pages are left in the Working Set of a process even if they are not in use. When free memory falls below a threshold, pages are trimmed from Working Sets. If they are needed they will then be soft-faulted back into the Working Set before leaving main memory.

Virtual Bytes- Virtual Bytes is the current size, in bytes, of the virtual address space the process is using. Use of virtual address space does not necessarily imply corresponding use of either disk or main memory pages. Virtual space is finite, and the process can limit its ability to load libraries.

Private Bytes- Private Bytes is the current size, in bytes, of memory that this process has allocated that cannot be shared with other processes.

Q1. Is it the private byte should I measure to be sure if the process is having any leak as it does not involve any shared libraries and any leak if happening will be coming from the process itself?

Q2. What is the total memory consumed by the process? Is it the Virtual byte size? or Is it the sum of Virtual Bytes and Working Set

Q3. Is there any relation between private bytes, working set and virtual bytes.

Q4. Any tool which gives a better idea memory information?

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A better tool would be valgrind/helgrind, but not under Windows unfortunately :( –  Kornel Kisielewicz Dec 31 '09 at 6:24
    
Is it the private byte should I measure to be sure if the process is having any leak If private bytes of a process don't grow then you have no memory leaks. If they grow it might be due to memory leaks and it might be due to memory fragmentation. I think it is difficult to say looking at growth of private bytes what it means exactly. –  skwllsp Dec 31 '09 at 7:08
    
Also there is a tool available here:theunixshell.blogspot.com/2013/11/… –  Vijay Nov 29 '13 at 9:00
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3 Answers

up vote 208 down vote accepted

The short answer to this question is that none of these values are a reliable indicator of how much memory an executable is actually using, and none of them are really appropriate for debugging a memory leak.

Private Bytes refer to the amount of memory that the process executable has asked for - not necessarily the amount it is actually using. They are "private" because they (usually) exclude memory-mapped files (i.e. shared DLLs). But - here's the catch - they don't necessarily exclude memory allocated by those files. There is no way to tell whether a change in private bytes was due to the executable itself, or due to a linked library. Private bytes are also not exclusively physical memory; they can be paged to disk or in the standby page list (i.e. no longer in use, but not paged yet either).

Working Set refers to the total physical memory (RAM) used by the process. However, unlike private bytes, this also includes memory-mapped files and various other resources, so it's an even less accurate measurement than the private bytes. This is the same value that gets reported in Task Manager's "Mem Usage" and has been the source of endless amounts of confusion in recent years. Memory in the Working Set is "physical" in the sense that it can be addressed without a page fault; however, the standby page list is also still physically in memory but not reported in the Working Set, and this is why you might see the "Mem Usage" suddenly drop when you minimize an application.

Virtual Bytes are the total virtual address space occupied by the entire process. This is like the working set, in the sense that it includes memory-mapped files (shared DLLs), but it also includes data in the standby list and data that has already been paged out and is sitting in a pagefile on disk somewhere. The total virtual bytes used by every process on a system under heavy load will add up to significantly more memory than the machine actually has.

So the relationships are:

  • Private Bytes are what your app has actually allocated, but include pagefile usage;
  • Working Set is the non-paged Private Bytes plus memory-mapped files;
  • Virtual Bytes are the Working Set plus paged Private Bytes and standby list.

There's another problem here; just as shared libraries can allocate memory inside your application module, leading to potential false positives reported in your app's Private Bytes, your application may also end up allocating memory inside the shared modules, leading to false negatives. That means it's actually possible for your application to have a memory leak that never manifests itself in the Private Bytes at all. Unlikely, but possible.

Private Bytes are a reasonable approximation of the amount of memory your executable is using and can be used to help narrow down a list of potential candidates for a memory leak; if you see the number growing and growing constantly and endlessly, you would want to check that process for a leak. This cannot, however, prove that there is or is not a leak.

One of the most effective tools for detecting/correcting memory leaks in Windows is actually Visual Studio (link goes to page on using VS for memory leaks, not the product page). Rational Purify is another possibility. Microsoft also has a more general best practices document on this subject. There are more tools listed in this previous question.

I hope this clears a few things up! Tracking down memory leaks is one of the most difficult things to do in debugging. Good luck.

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I am afraid that you answer is not quite correct. Private Bytes refer to the amount of memory (RAM) that the process executable has asked for - not only physical memory. Thus you can surely inspect most of the memory leak cases by monitoring private bytes. Try ::VisualAlloc to commit a large chunk of memory (say 1.5G). You should be able to see that your private bytes are way larger than the working set. Which proves that your "Working Set is the Private Bytes plus Memory-mapped files" is incorrect. –  Findekano Apr 2 '10 at 9:46
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Actually, I beleive the write understanding is "Working Set is the in-memory Private Bytes plus Memory-mapped files". And Private Bytes CAN be swapped out - you can see private bytes larger than the physical memory you have in the machine. –  Findekano Apr 2 '10 at 9:47
    
I concur with the other commenters that the part referring to private bytes being accessible without a page fault is not correct. –  BeeOnRope Apr 28 '10 at 19:52
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@BeeOnRope, @Findekano: You're right, and thanks for the heads-up, I've corrected the error. –  Aaronaught Apr 28 '10 at 20:55
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@Aaronaught: Your first statement about reliable indicator and appropriate for debugging is confusing. Private bytes is a reliable indicator of a leak the application memory space. It could be a dependent DLL and indirect but it is a leak in the application memory space. Can you explain why it cannot be used for debugging? a full memory dump of the application process should tell us what is consuming this memory. I am not sure i understand why it cannot be used for debugging. Can you shed some light? –  G33kKahuna Jan 30 '12 at 13:57
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You should not try to use perfmon, task manager or any tool like that to determine memory leaks. They are good for identifying trends, but not much else. The numbers they report in absolute terms are too vague and aggregated to be useful for a specific task such as memory leak detection.

A previous reply to this question has given a great explanation of what the various types are.

You ask about a tool recommendation: I recommend Memory Validator. Capable of monitoring applications that make billions of memory allocations.

http://www.softwareverify.com/cpp/memory/index.html

Disclaimer: I designed Memory Validator.

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I can't even run a simple class file (in Java)? What gives? –  jsn Mar 6 '12 at 16:13
    
I suspect that Stephen and Devil are somehow related or even cloned... :D ;) –  Robert Koritnik Apr 10 '12 at 13:36
    
Sorry to disappoint. I have no idea who Devil Jin is. –  Stephen Kellett Feb 9 '13 at 12:24
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There is an interesting discussion here: http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/vcgeneral/thread/307d658a-f677-40f2-bdef-e6352b0bfe9e/ My understanding of this thread is that freeing small allocations are not reflected in Private Bytes or Working Set.

Long story short:

if I call

p=malloc(1000);
free(p);

then the Private Bytes reflect only the allocation, not the deallocation.

if I call

p=malloc(>512k);
free(p);

then the Private Bytes correctly reflect the allocation and the deallocation.

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This is explained by the fact that the C standard library memory functions use a custom or Win32 Heap which is a memory management mechanism on top of the low-level process-level memory management. –  Kyberias Jun 1 '13 at 8:37
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