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This is what i tried so far to get the user's input:

master = Tk()
master.title('Title')

v = StringVar()

L1 = Label(master, text = 'Name')
L1.pack(side = LEFT)

E1 = Entry(master, textvariable = v, bd = 5)
E1.pack(side = RIGHT)

def userinput():
    a = raw_input(v.get())
    print a


b = Button(master, text = 'Submit', command = userinput)
b.pack(side = BOTTOM)


master.mainloop()

The real question is, how can i store the v.get() raw_input into a variable outside the function? Thx!

share|improve this question
    
Is it even possible to pass a function like v.get() in raw_input() method? – adil Nov 7 '13 at 17:43
1  
@adil - Yes, because v.get() returns a string, which will then become the prompt for raw_input. – iCodez Nov 7 '13 at 17:43
    
O yeah I got it....my bad never thought of that :) – adil Nov 7 '13 at 17:49
2  
Why do you use a GUI for some input, and raw_input for other input? That is highly unusual. If you're creating a GUI, you should never call raw_input. What is it you're trying to accomplish? – Bryan Oakley Nov 7 '13 at 18:07
    
I agree with Bryan Oakley – furas Nov 7 '13 at 18:11

You can make a global variable to hold the input:

inp = None

and then have your function update that variable:

def userinput():
    global inp
    a = raw_input(v.get())
    print a
    inp = a

So, your code will look like this:

master = Tk()
master.title('Title')

v = StringVar()

# Variable to hold the input
inp = None

L1 = Label(master, text = 'Name')
L1.pack(side = LEFT)

E1 = Entry(master, textvariable = v, bd = 5)
E1.pack(side = RIGHT)

def userinput():
    # Declare 'inp' to be global
    global inp
    a = raw_input(v.get())
    print a
    # Update the variable
    inp = a


b = Button(master, text = 'Submit', command = userinput)
b.pack(side = BOTTOM)


master.mainloop()

In the above code, inp will always be a fresh copy of the input which you can use elsewhere in the code.

However, it might be worthwhile to look into making your code a class. That way, you can have a class attribute named self.inp and you won't have to do global inp.

share|improve this answer

As others say - use globe

Example using class

from Tkinter import *

class MainWindow():

    def __init__(self, master):
        self.master = master

        self.master.title('Title')

        self.v = StringVar()

        self.L1 = Label(self.master, text = 'Name')
        self.L1.pack(side = LEFT)

        self.E1 = Entry(self.master, textvariable = self.v, bd = 5)
        self.E1.pack(side = RIGHT)

        self.B1 = Button(self.master, text = 'Submit', command = self.userinput)
        self.B1.pack(side = BOTTOM)

        self.B2 = Button(self.master, text = 'Print', command = self.print_external_variable)
        self.B2.pack(side = TOP)

    #------------------

    def userinput(self):
        global external_variable

        external_variable = raw_input(self.v.get())
        #external_variable = self.v.get()

        print "inside - userinput:", external_variable

    #------------------

    def print_external_variable(self):
        # you don't need global if you don't change external_variable

        print "inside - print:", external_variable

#----------------------------------------------------------------------

external_variable = '- none -'

print "before run:", external_variable

master = Tk()
MainWindow(master)
master.mainloop()

print "after run:", external_variable
share|improve this answer

Just make it return the User Input

def userinput():
    a = raw_input(v.get())
    return a

Then when you call it,you can do that by:

myvar=userinput()

Now,myvar contains the value of user input.

share|improve this answer
    
The Problem is that function is called whenever the button is clicked so how is this line b = Button(master, text = 'Submit', command = userinput) supposed to save some returned value can you explain. I think as iCodez said its always better to make a class and set class variables to different values using the class functions (like userinput()). – adil Nov 7 '13 at 17:47
    
Yep that would be the best approach. – Gogo Nov 8 '13 at 5:56

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