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I have these 2 hashes below. First one is a template, second one is the users settings.

I need to be able to create a loop that goes over the second hash and if it finds a difference (a value exists in the first one but not the second) then it needs to do something with that key & value (lets just say print it)

 $VAR1 = {
      'Hotkeys' => [
                     'key',
                     'keyCR',
                     'keyHighlight',
                     'updated'
                   ],
      'Actions' => [
                     'action',
                     'actionCR',
                     'actionHighlight'
                   ],
      'Settings' => [
                      'chbAcronym',
                      'chbCompleted'
                    ],
      'NewSetting' => [
                        'NewValue'
                      ]
    };

$VAR1 = {
      'Hotkeys' => [
                     'key',
                     'keyCR',
                     'keyHighlight'
                   ],
      'Actions' => [
                     'action',
                     'actionCR',
                     'actionHighlight'
                   ],
      'Settings' => [
                      'chbAcronym',
                      'chbCompleted'
                    ]
    };
share|improve this question
2  
The CPAN has Hash::Diff if you are interested in that too. – squiguy Nov 7 '13 at 18:31
    
I just tried it but this didnt return anything %c = %{ diff( \%settingsTemplate, \%settingsCurrent ) }; print Dumper(%c); – SBB Nov 7 '13 at 18:39
    
Might you need to pass Dumper a reference to %c? (print Dumper \%c;) – squiguy Nov 7 '13 at 18:41
    
Printed $VAR1 = {}; but there are clearly differences in the 2 :/ – SBB Nov 7 '13 at 18:44
1  
Hash::Diff only works with value elements that are scalars or another hash. Since you values are Arrays, you need to compare them. – Fred the Magic Wonder Dog Nov 7 '13 at 18:52

Iterate over the keys and compare the arrays of matching keys.

sub my_special_hash_diff {

  my(%hash_A,%hash_B) = (@_) ; #This may need some tweaking, you probably need 
                               # need to pass in Hash references. 
  for $key ( keys %hash_B ) {

     @array1 = $hash_B{$key} ; 
     @array2 = $hash_A{$key} ; 
     compare_2_arrays(@array1,@array2) ; # See answer below. 
  }


}

How to compare two perl arrays

Comparing Two Arrays Using Perl

share|improve this answer

If I understand your issue correctly, you want to add items from the template hash to the user settings' hash only if those items from the template hash do not exist within the users' settings hash.

We can take advantage of Perl's Autovivification which will create the complete data structure within the user settings' hash if an item in that hash doesn't exist. Consider the following:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

my %template = (
    'Hotkeys'    => [ 'key',        'keyCR',    'keyHighlight', 'updated' ],
    'Actions'    => [ 'action',     'actionCR', 'actionHighlight' ],
    'Settings'   => [ 'chbAcronym', 'chbCompleted' ],
    'NewSetting' => [ 'NewValue' ]
);

my %userSettings = (
    'Hotkeys'  => [ 'key',        'keyCR',        'keyHighlight' ],
    'Actions'  => [ 'action',     'actionCR',     'actionHighlight' ],
    'Settings' => [ 'chbAcronym', 'chbCompleted', 'aUserSetting' ]
);

updateUserSettings( \%template, \%userSettings );
print Dumper \%userSettings;

sub updateUserSettings {
    my ( $templateHash, $settingsHash ) = @_;

    for my $key ( keys %$templateHash ) {
        $settingsHash->{$key}->[$_] //= $templateHash->{$key}->[$_]
          for 0 .. $#{ ${$templateHash}{$key} };
    }
}

Output (a dump of %userSettings after the 'update'):

$VAR1 = {
          'Hotkeys' => [
                         'key',
                         'keyCR',
                         'keyHighlight',
                         'updated'
                       ],
          'Actions' => [
                         'action',
                         'actionCR',
                         'actionHighlight'
                       ],
          'NewSetting' => [
                            'NewValue'
                          ],
          'Settings' => [
                          'chbAcronym',
                          'chbCompleted',
                          'aUserSetting'
                        ]
        }

Note that %userSettings is only updated with missing %template information and nothing else is disturbed.

The subroutine updateUserSettings uses Perl's defined-or (//=) operator as it iterates through all the keys of %template, so %userSettings isn't changed if a key/value already exists, otherwise it updated.

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer

Assuming that the first hash (template) contains all the possible values that the second can have, you can use this approach, which may not be the most efficient but is simple and doesn't require external modules:

use strict;

my $template = {
      'Hotkeys' => [
                     'key',
                     'keyCR',
                     'keyHighlight',
                     'updated'
                   ],
      'Actions' => [
                     'action',
                     'actionCR',
                     'actionHighlight'
                   ],
      'Settings' => [
                      'chbAcronym',
                      'chbCompleted'
                    ],
      'NewSetting' => [
                        'NewValue'
                      ]
    };

my $user = {
      'Hotkeys' => [
                     'key',
                     'keyCR',
                     'keyHighlight'
                   ],
      'Actions' => [
                     'action',
                     'actionCR',
                     'actionHighlight'
                   ],
      'Settings' => [
                      'chbAcronym',
                      'chbCompleted'
                    ]
    };

#take all user keys so that we don't perform a join in each iteration
my $all_user_keys = join(' ',keys %$user);
#loop all template keys to see what's missing from user keys
foreach my $template_key( keys %$template ) {
    #this will return a true value if the template key also exists in user hash
    my $key_exists_in_user = ( $all_user_keys =~ m/$template_key/ );
    #if it exists, perform a second loop for the values of the array
    if ($key_exists_in_user) {
        #take all user values so that we don't perform a join in each iteration
        my $all_user_values_of_key = join(' ', @{$user->{$template_key}});
        #loop all values of template key, to see what's missing from user values
        foreach my $template_key_value (@{$template->{$template_key}}) {
            #if value is not found, do what you want with it
            unless( $all_user_values_of_key =~ m/$template_key_value/ ) {
                print "  -- value '$template_key_value' does not exist in user key '$template_key'. will add it now\n";
                push @{$user->{$template_key}}, $template_key_value;
            }
        }
    #else, hash key is not found, so do what you want with it
    } else {
        print "hash key '$template_key' does not exist in user settings. Will add it now\n";
        $user->{$template_key} = $template->{$template_key};
    }
}

I used your example hashes and I also assumed that your hashes are actually hashrefs (copy pasted as they were)

share|improve this answer
    
That's working for the most part however there is a small issue with the New setting. It returns hash key 'NewSetting' does not exist in user settings. It should be a new block and have a setting under it. Is that possible? The whole point of this is to insert the settings that don't exist into the users config file – SBB Nov 7 '13 at 19:44
    
you can insert the setting in the user with something like $user->{$template_key} = $template->{$template_key}; . Are the array values of interest as well or we are just looking in the hash keys? – foibs Nov 7 '13 at 19:46
    
So if the [Block] doesnt exist, it needs to add the block. If it does exist but there is a new setting, it needs to add the setting to the block (Key). If there is a new block and settings with it, it will then add both the block and its settings. – SBB Nov 7 '13 at 19:48
    
see my edited answer. it adds all the missing values. In the end, user hash will be identical to template hash – foibs Nov 7 '13 at 19:51

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