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I'm running Windows 8.1 x64 with Java 7 update 45 x64 (no 32 bit Java installed) on a Surface Pro 2 tablet.

The code below takes 1688ms when the type of i is a long and 109ms when i is an int. Why is long (a 64 bit type) an order of magnitude slower than int on a 64 bit platform with a 64 bit JVM?

My only speculation is that the CPU takes longer to add a 64 bit integer than a 32 bit one, but that seems unlikely. I suspect Haswell doesn't use ripple-carry adders.

I'm running this in Eclipse Kepler SR1, btw.

public class Main {

    private static long i = Integer.MAX_VALUE;

    public static void main(String[] args) {    
        System.out.println("Starting the loop");
        long startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
        while(!decrementAndCheck()){
        }
        long endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
        System.out.println("Finished the loop in " + (endTime - startTime) + "ms");
    }

    private static boolean decrementAndCheck() {
        return --i < 0;
    }

}

Edit: Here are the results from equivalent C++ code compiled by VS 2013 (below), same system. long: 72265ms int: 74656ms Those results were in debug 32 bit mode.

In 64 bit release mode: long: 875ms long long: 906ms int: 1047ms

This suggests that the result I observed is JVM optimization weirdness rather than CPU limitations.

#include "stdafx.h"
#include "iostream"
#include "windows.h"
#include "limits.h"

long long i = INT_MAX;

using namespace std;


boolean decrementAndCheck() {
return --i < 0;
}


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{


cout << "Starting the loop" << endl;

unsigned long startTime = GetTickCount64();
while (!decrementAndCheck()){
}
unsigned long endTime = GetTickCount64();

cout << "Finished the loop in " << (endTime - startTime) << "ms" << endl;



}

Edit: Just tried this again in Java 8 RTM, no significant change.

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8  
The most likely suspect is your set up, not the CPU or the various parts of the JVM. Can you reliably reproduce this measurement? Not repeating the loop, not warming up the JIT, using currentTimeMillis(), running code that can trivially be optimized away completely, etc. reeks of unreliable results. –  delnan Nov 7 '13 at 18:44
1  
I was benchmarking a while ago, I had to use a long as the loop counter, because the JIT compiler optimized the loop out, when I used an int. One would need to look at the disassembly of the generated machine code. –  Sam Nov 7 '13 at 18:46
1  
@ZongZhengLi Yes, the result is quite repeatable. –  Techrocket9 Nov 7 '13 at 18:48
7  
This is not a correct microbenchmark, and I would not expect that its results reflect reality in any way. –  Louis Wasserman Nov 7 '13 at 19:18
5  
All of the comments berating the OP for failing to write a proper Java microbenchmark are unspeakably lazy. This is the sort of thing that's very easy to figure out if you just look and see what the JVM does to the code. –  tmyklebu Nov 7 '13 at 20:03
show 13 more comments

7 Answers

up vote 56 down vote accepted

My JVM does this pretty straightforward thing to the inner loop when you use longs:

0x00007fdd859dbb80: test   %eax,0x5f7847a(%rip)  /* fun JVM hack */
0x00007fdd859dbb86: dec    %r11                  /* i-- */
0x00007fdd859dbb89: mov    %r11,0x258(%r10)      /* store i to memory */
0x00007fdd859dbb90: test   %r11,%r11             /* unnecessary test */
0x00007fdd859dbb93: jge    0x00007fdd859dbb80    /* go back to the loop top */

It cheats, hard, when you use ints; first there's some screwiness that I don't claim to understand but looks like setup for a funrolled loop:

0x00007f3dc290b5a1: mov    %r11d,%r9d
0x00007f3dc290b5a4: dec    %r9d
0x00007f3dc290b5a7: mov    %r9d,0x258(%r10)
0x00007f3dc290b5ae: test   %r9d,%r9d
0x00007f3dc290b5b1: jl     0x00007f3dc290b662
0x00007f3dc290b5b7: add    $0xfffffffffffffffe,%r11d
0x00007f3dc290b5bb: mov    %r9d,%ecx
0x00007f3dc290b5be: dec    %ecx              
0x00007f3dc290b5c0: mov    %ecx,0x258(%r10)   
0x00007f3dc290b5c7: cmp    %r11d,%ecx
0x00007f3dc290b5ca: jle    0x00007f3dc290b5d1
0x00007f3dc290b5cc: mov    %ecx,%r9d
0x00007f3dc290b5cf: jmp    0x00007f3dc290b5bb
0x00007f3dc290b5d1: and    $0xfffffffffffffffe,%r9d
0x00007f3dc290b5d5: mov    %r9d,%r8d
0x00007f3dc290b5d8: neg    %r8d
0x00007f3dc290b5db: sar    $0x1f,%r8d
0x00007f3dc290b5df: shr    $0x1f,%r8d
0x00007f3dc290b5e3: sub    %r9d,%r8d
0x00007f3dc290b5e6: sar    %r8d
0x00007f3dc290b5e9: neg    %r8d
0x00007f3dc290b5ec: and    $0xfffffffffffffffe,%r8d
0x00007f3dc290b5f0: shl    %r8d
0x00007f3dc290b5f3: mov    %r8d,%r11d
0x00007f3dc290b5f6: neg    %r11d
0x00007f3dc290b5f9: sar    $0x1f,%r11d
0x00007f3dc290b5fd: shr    $0x1e,%r11d
0x00007f3dc290b601: sub    %r8d,%r11d
0x00007f3dc290b604: sar    $0x2,%r11d
0x00007f3dc290b608: neg    %r11d
0x00007f3dc290b60b: and    $0xfffffffffffffffe,%r11d
0x00007f3dc290b60f: shl    $0x2,%r11d
0x00007f3dc290b613: mov    %r11d,%r9d
0x00007f3dc290b616: neg    %r9d
0x00007f3dc290b619: sar    $0x1f,%r9d
0x00007f3dc290b61d: shr    $0x1d,%r9d
0x00007f3dc290b621: sub    %r11d,%r9d
0x00007f3dc290b624: sar    $0x3,%r9d
0x00007f3dc290b628: neg    %r9d
0x00007f3dc290b62b: and    $0xfffffffffffffffe,%r9d
0x00007f3dc290b62f: shl    $0x3,%r9d
0x00007f3dc290b633: mov    %ecx,%r11d
0x00007f3dc290b636: sub    %r9d,%r11d
0x00007f3dc290b639: cmp    %r11d,%ecx
0x00007f3dc290b63c: jle    0x00007f3dc290b64f
0x00007f3dc290b63e: xchg   %ax,%ax /* OK, fine; I know what a nop looks like */

then the funrolled loop itself:

0x00007f3dc290b640: add    $0xfffffffffffffff0,%ecx
0x00007f3dc290b643: mov    %ecx,0x258(%r10)
0x00007f3dc290b64a: cmp    %r11d,%ecx
0x00007f3dc290b64d: jg     0x00007f3dc290b640

then the teardown code for the funrolled loop, itself a test and a straight loop:

0x00007f3dc290b64f: cmp    $0xffffffffffffffff,%ecx
0x00007f3dc290b652: jle    0x00007f3dc290b662
0x00007f3dc290b654: dec    %ecx
0x00007f3dc290b656: mov    %ecx,0x258(%r10)
0x00007f3dc290b65d: cmp    $0xffffffffffffffff,%ecx
0x00007f3dc290b660: jg     0x00007f3dc290b654

So it goes 16 times faster for ints because the JIT funrolled the int loop 16 times, but didn't funroll the long loop at all.

For completeness, here is the code I actually tried:

public class foo136 {
  private static int i = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println("Starting the loop");
    for (int foo = 0; foo < 100; foo++)
      doit();
  }

  static void doit() {
    i = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
    long startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    while(!decrementAndCheck()){
    }
    long endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.println("Finished the loop in " + (endTime - startTime) + "ms");
  }

  private static boolean decrementAndCheck() {
    return --i < 0;
  }
}

The assembly dumps were generated using the options -XX:+UnlockDiagnosticVMOptions -XX:+PrintAssembly. Note that you need to mess around with your JVM installation to have this work for you as well; you need to put some random shared library in exactly the right place or it will fail.

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4  
OK, so the net-net isn't that the long version is slower, but rather than the int version is faster. That makes sense. Likely not as much effort was invested in making the JIT optimize long expressions. –  Hot Licks Nov 7 '13 at 21:45
1  
@BrianDHall gcc uses -f as the command-line switch for "flag", and the unroll-loops optimization is turned on by saying -funroll-loops. I just use "unroll" to describe the optimization. –  chrylis Nov 8 '13 at 8:14
3  
funroll is more fun ;) –  drxzcl Nov 8 '13 at 12:12
3  
@BRPocock: The Java compiler cannot, but the JIT sure can. –  tmyklebu Nov 12 '13 at 19:48
1  
Just to be clear, it didn't "funroll" it. It unrolled it AND converted the unrolled loop to i-=16, which of course is 16x faster. –  Aleksandr Dubinsky Nov 23 '13 at 8:38
show 9 more comments

The JVM stack is defined in terms of words, whose size is an implementation detail but must be at least 32 bits wide. The JVM implementer may use 64-bit words, but the bytecode can't rely on this, and so operations with long or double values have to be handled with extra care. In particular, the JVM integer branch instructions are defined on exactly the type int.

In the case of your code, disassembly is instructive. Here's the bytecode for the int version as compiled by the Oracle JDK 7:

private static boolean decrementAndCheck();
  Code:
     0: getstatic     #14  // Field i:I
     3: iconst_1      
     4: isub          
     5: dup           
     6: putstatic     #14  // Field i:I
     9: ifge          16
    12: iconst_1      
    13: goto          17
    16: iconst_0      
    17: ireturn       

Note that the JVM will load the value of your static i (0), subtract one (3-4), duplicate the value on the stack (5), and push it back into the variable (6). It then does a compare-with-zero branch and returns.

The version with the long is a bit more complicated:

private static boolean decrementAndCheck();
  Code:
     0: getstatic     #14  // Field i:J
     3: lconst_1      
     4: lsub          
     5: dup2          
     6: putstatic     #14  // Field i:J
     9: lconst_0      
    10: lcmp          
    11: ifge          18
    14: iconst_1      
    15: goto          19
    18: iconst_0      
    19: ireturn       

First, when the JVM duplicates the new value on the stack (5), it has to duplicate two stack words. In your case, it's quite possible that this is no more expensive than duplicating one, since the JVM is free to use a 64-bit word if convenient. However, you'll notice that the branch logic is longer here. The JVM doesn't have an instruction to compare a long with zero, so it has to push a constant 0L onto the stack (9), do a general long comparison (10), and then branch on the value of that calculation.

Here are two plausible scenarios:

  • The JVM is following the bytecode path exactly. In this case, it's doing more work in the long version, pushing and popping several extra values, and these are on the virtual managed stack, not the real hardware-assisted CPU stack. If this is the case, you'll still see a significant performance difference after warmup.
  • The JVM realizes that it can optimize this code. In this case, it's taking extra time to optimize away some of the practically unnecessary push/compare logic. If this is the case, you'll see very little performance difference after warmup.

I recommend you write a correct microbenchmark to eliminate the effect of having the JIT kick in, and also trying this with a final condition that isn't zero, to force the JVM to do the same comparison on the int that it does with the long.

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1  
@Katona Not necessarily. Very especially, the Client and Server HotSpot JVMs are completely different implementations, and Ilya didn't indicate selecting Server (Client is usually the 32-bit default). –  chrylis Nov 7 '13 at 19:34
1  
@tmyklebu The issue is that the benchmark is measuring several different things at once. Using a nonzero terminal condition reduces the number of variables. –  chrylis Nov 7 '13 at 19:35
1  
@tmyklebu The point is that the OP had intended to compare the speed of increments, decrements and comparisions on ints vs longs. Instead (assuming this answer is correct) they were measuring only comparisons, and only against 0, which is a special case. If nothing else, it makes the original benchmark misleading -- it looks like it measures three general cases, when in fact it measures one, specific case. –  yshavit Nov 7 '13 at 20:17
2  
@tmyklebu I'm not even sure if we're agreeing or disagreeing... –  yshavit Nov 7 '13 at 20:29
1  
@tmyklebu Not at all. I'm all for understanding the root causes. But, having identified that one major root cause is that the benchmark was skewed, it's not invalid to change the benchmark to remove the skew, as well as to dig in and understand more about that skew (for instance, that it can enable more efficient bytecode, that it can make it easier to unroll loops, etc). That's why I upvoted both this answer (which identified the skew) and yours (which digs into the skew in more detail). –  yshavit Nov 7 '13 at 20:48
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Basic unit of data in a Java Virtual Machine is word. Choosing the right word size is left upon the implementation of the JVM. A JVM implementation should choose a minimum word size of 32 bits. It can choose a higher word size to gain efficiency. Neither there is any restriction that a 64 bit JVM should choose 64 bit word only.

The underlying architecture doesn't rules that the word size should also be the same. JVM reads/writes data word by word. This is the reason why it might be taking longer for a long than an int.

Here you can find more on the same topic.

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I have just written a benchmark using caliper.

The results are quite consistent with the original code: a ~12x speedup for using int over long. It certainly seems that the loop unrolling reported by tmyklebu or something very similar is going on.

timeIntDecrements         195,266,845.000
timeLongDecrements      2,321,447,978.000

This is my code; note that it uses a freshly-built snapshot of caliper, since I could not figure out how to code against their existing beta release.

package test;

import com.google.caliper.Benchmark;
import com.google.caliper.Param;

public final class App {

    @Param({""+1}) int number;

    private static class IntTest {
        public static int v;
        public static void reset() {
            v = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
        }
        public static boolean decrementAndCheck() {
            return --v < 0;
        }
    }

    private static class LongTest {
        public static long v;
        public static void reset() {
            v = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
        }
        public static boolean decrementAndCheck() {
            return --v < 0;
        }
    }

    @Benchmark
    int timeLongDecrements(int reps) {
        int k=0;
        for (int i=0; i<reps; i++) {
            LongTest.reset();
            while (!LongTest.decrementAndCheck()) { k++; }
        }
        return (int)LongTest.v | k;
    }    

    @Benchmark
    int timeIntDecrements(int reps) {
        int k=0;
        for (int i=0; i<reps; i++) {
            IntTest.reset();
            while (!IntTest.decrementAndCheck()) { k++; }
        }
        return IntTest.v | k;
    }
}
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For the record, this version does a crude "warmup":

public class LongSpeed {

    private static long i = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
    private static int j = Integer.MAX_VALUE;

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        for (int x = 0; x < 10; x++) {
            runLong();
            runWord();
        }
    }

    private static void runLong() {
        System.out.println("Starting the long loop");
        i = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
        long startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
        while(!decrementAndCheckI()){

        }
        long endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();

        System.out.println("Finished the long loop in " + (endTime - startTime) + "ms");
    }

    private static void runWord() {
        System.out.println("Starting the word loop");
        j = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
        long startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
        while(!decrementAndCheckJ()){

        }
        long endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();

        System.out.println("Finished the word loop in " + (endTime - startTime) + "ms");
    }

    private static boolean decrementAndCheckI() {
        return --i < 0;
    }

    private static boolean decrementAndCheckJ() {
        return --j < 0;
    }

}

The overall times improve about 30%, but the ratio between the two remains roughly the same.

share|improve this answer
    
@TedHopp - That's weird. –  Hot Licks Nov 7 '13 at 19:58
    
@TedHopp - I tried changing the loop limits in mine and it remained essentially unchanged. –  Hot Licks Nov 7 '13 at 20:00
    
I have been trying to figure out what part of TedHopp's example caused the results to be the same, because I got comparable numbers with the code from his answer. Removing the warmup didn't make the comparable result go away. Switching from compz to comp-2 also didn't make the comparable result go away. I haven't found the key difference yet. –  Techrocket9 Nov 7 '13 at 20:13
    
@Techrocket9 - Ignore my earlier comment. My code had a stupid typo. –  Ted Hopp Nov 7 '13 at 20:19
    
@Techrocket9: I get similar numbers (int is 20ish times faster) with this code. –  tmyklebu Nov 7 '13 at 20:44
add comment

For the records:

if i use

boolean decrementAndCheckLong() {
    lo = lo - 1l;
    return lo < -1l;
}

(changed "l--" to "l = l - 1l") long performance improves by ~50%

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I don't have a 64 bit machine to test with, but the rather large difference suggests that there is more than the slightly longer bytecode at work.

I see very close times for long/int (4400 vs 4800ms) on my 32-bit 1.7.0_45.

This is only a guess, but I strongly suspect that it is the effect of a memory misalignment penalty. To confirm/deny the suspicion, try adding a public static int dummy = 0; before the declaration of i. That will push i down by 4 bytes in memory layout and may make it properly aligned for better performance. Confirmed to be not causing the issue.

EDIT: The reasoning behind this is that the VM may not reorder fields at its leisure adding padding for optimal alignment, since that may interfere with JNI (Not the case).

share|improve this answer
    
no difference under 1.7.0_25 64-bit –  tucuxi Nov 7 '13 at 19:26
    
The VM certainly is allowed to reorder fields and add padding. –  Hot Licks Nov 7 '13 at 19:49
    
JNI has to access objects through these annoying, slow accessor methods that take a few opaque handles anyway since GC can happen while native code is running. It's plenty free to reorder fields and add padding. –  tmyklebu Nov 7 '13 at 20:38
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