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I have some CPython issue that I cannot understand. It all boils down to the fact that using the same code to read small text file works but cannot even read a single line from 20GB txt file.

Some useful info:

  • smaller file ~1MB is a subset of the big 20GB file (1MB from the begining)
  • both files are text files with lines of width ~2000chars delimited by CR (\r)

The obvious solution:

f = open(r'filename', 'r')
for line in f:
    print(line)
f.close()

works...but..only for short file. For the big one hangs forever (or longer that it should take to print at least the first line).

So I wanted to at least try to read one line like this:

f = open(r'filename', 'r')
print(f.readline())
f.close()

Similar situation here - works for small file instantly but for the big one after substantial amount of time spits that message:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "***", line 16, in <module>
    print(f.readline())
SystemError: ..\Objects\stringobject.c:3902: bad argument to internal function

How the heck should I read a big text file?

UPDATE:

Turns out human being thinks clearer whan having enough sleep ;-). The problem is solved - turns out I've overlooked one sentence in the documentation:

Python is usually built with universal newlines support; supplying 'U' opens the file as a text file, but lines may be terminated by any of the following: the Unix end-of-line convention '\n', the Macintosh convention '\r', or the Windows convention '\r\n'.

Just thought universal newlines are 'turned on' by default.

My above statement that:

print(f.readline())

was reading just one line was partially false (my bad). Remember I said my small file was created by taking chunk of the big one? During that operation line endings changed from (CR) to (CRLF) so what I saw was the first line. All of that made me think that problem is not in line endings.

Thank you all for time and help.

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3  
When you use the f.readline() strategy (the one that's not in a loop) with the smaller file, does it only print a single line, or does it print the entire file? I ask because if it prints the entire file, that is a sign that the CRs in your file aren't being counted as newlines in Python's readline(). In that case you need a read(chunk_size) strategy. –  Andrew Gorcester Nov 7 '13 at 19:12
    
possible duplicate of Python recognizing \r as a line delimiter –  Mark Hildreth Nov 7 '13 at 19:15
2  
@Andrew: just first line so it (IMHO) is not related to not being able to detect this ending - in addition Python's doc says \r, \r\n, \n are treated the same as line delimiter. –  Artur Nov 7 '13 at 19:17
2  
If it is a line endings issue, try opening the file with mode 'rU' for universal line endings. –  RemcoGerlich Nov 7 '13 at 19:18
1  
what happens if you do f.read(1024)? –  Joran Beasley Nov 7 '13 at 19:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Although your "test" only prints one line, that does not mean it is only reading one line from the file. For me in a \r-delimited test file, I also only get one line of output. However if I read each line in using a for loop, it still only prints one line. Or if I try readline() a second time on a multi-line file, it doesn't give any more lines.

Try opening your file with the 'rU' parameter on the same file:

f =  open('filename', 'rU')

My tests of a file with several lines of \r-delimited text give:

f = open('test.txt','r')  # Opening the "wrong" way
for line in f:
    print line

Output:

abcdef

Then with rU:

f = open('test.txt','rU')
for line in f:
    print line

Output:

abcdef

abcdef

abcdef

abcdef

abcdef

EDIT: In support of Joran's explanation, this test pretty much shows it to be the case that the entire file is loading and the carriage return character is causing over-printing when you see only one line of output...

f = open('test.txt','r')     #  Opening the "wrong" way again
for line in f:
    print "XXX{}YYY".format(line)

Output gets overwritten...

YYYdefdef
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1  
this is a very good point ... afaik in python \r moves you back to the begining of the line potentially writing over the previous one ... so just cause you see one line does not necessarily mean there is only one –  Joran Beasley Nov 7 '13 at 19:34
    
That is a great explanation of why the output looks like it does. Thanks Joran. –  beroe Nov 7 '13 at 19:35
    
for example print "hello\rworld" –  Joran Beasley Nov 7 '13 at 19:37
2  
Exactly, or even better, print "hello\ryou" –  beroe Nov 7 '13 at 19:40
def my_readline(fh,delim):
    return "".join(iter(lambda:fh.read(1),delim))

f = open(some_file)
line = my_readline(f,"\r")

should work if you can at least get .read(1) to work ... but if that doesnt work I dont know that anything will ... maybe use shell commands to split the file into smaller chunks somehow ... but I suspect beroe's answer is the real answer

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