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I have a client that interacts with a restful web service using CXF. I want to make use of asynchronous mode provided by CXF since 2.7.0 http://cxf.apache.org/javadoc/latest/org/apache/cxf/jaxrs/client/WebClient.html. I havent really found a good example of a client using this feature

Previously i had code that did some thing like this

Response response = webclient.get();

updated code:

Future<Response> responseFuture = webclient.async().get();
// code to get future response ...

My questions:

  • Is this all i need to do and how will the client behavior change? My understanding is that previously it would create a separate thread for each client request. Now it will perform multiple requests using a single thread or thread pool?

  • Also, what is the best way for me to monitor what it is doing in the background in the two different cases?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, yes and no.

That's all you need to do in your code, yes. However, by default, CXF would still use an HttpURLConnection object which requires a dedicated thread per request. Thus, under the covers, it would use CXF's thread pools for this.

However, you can add CXF's async based transport (see http://cxf.apache.org/docs/asynchronous-client-http-transport.html ) which would allow hundreds of outstanding requests with very few threads used.

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OK thanks for that info. So I have the new code in place and the required CXF and HttpAsyncClient jars are on my classpath. However it still seems to be just using the HttpURLConnection under the covers. According to the docs it should automatically use async client once its on the classpath. I've added breakpoints to HttpURLConnection and HttpAsyncClient to try analyze which is being used at runtime. Any suggestion on what i might be doing wrong here or a pointer to where the logic is to decide which type of connection to use? –  ccaffrey Nov 8 '13 at 16:00

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