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I need to print out and sort the avgCost integer by lowest cost first.

How can I accomplish this by any kind of sort?

I just need help to sort the avgCost integer in order to print it out with the lowest cost being first. There doesn't need to be a specific sort routine. Could I accomplish this by the already integrated qsort()?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <cstdlib>

int main(void)
{
  struct mcDonalds {
      char   *name;
      char    *address;
  int   avgCost;
  char  foodType;
};

struct  burgerKing {
      char   *name;
      char   *address;
  int   avgCost;
  char  foodType;
};

struct tacoBell {
  char   *name;
      char   *address;
  int   avgCost;
  char  foodType;
};

struct mcDonalds     a;
struct burgerKing    b;
struct tacoBell  c;


printf("\n\n");
system("PAUSE");
return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
What kind of sorting have you tried? –  m0skit0 Nov 7 '13 at 21:34
5  
Yes, you could use qsort, but before you start to think about sorting I'd suggest you read up a bit on how to use structs and arrays. Having several structs with identical definitions isn't the way to go. If you want to store data about restaurants make a struct type for that instead and then an array to hold the separate restaurants. –  jpw Nov 7 '13 at 21:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Maybe you could try something like the example below, and then use a bubble sort on the avgCost (you can find better performing sorters but this is for illustration).

I like the idea of a linked list, i.e., implemented as a Priority Queue, but the code below gives you another example to think about. Note that I set up your data as a pointer to an array of structs rather than as individual structs for each food vendor (as also mentioned by metsales and the comment by jpw).

Also, wouldn't you want a float variable for the cost? I went ahead and set it up that way.

Hope this is helpful.


#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct restaurant {
    char *name;
    char *address;
    float avgCost;
    char foodType;
};

int main(void)
{
    int n = 3;
    float cost[] = {2.32, 3.56, 1.89};
    struct restaurant* fastfood = malloc(sizeof(struct restaurant)*n);

    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        //fastfood[i].name = // you can add names and other data as you see fit
        fastfood[i].avgCost = cost[i];
    }

    // Bubble sort here; not a great performer, O(n^2), but maybe ok for your app.
    for (int i = 0; i <= n; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < n-i-1; j++) {
            if(fastfood[j].avgCost > fastfood[j+1].avgCost) {
                struct restaurant temp = fastfood[j];
                fastfood[j] = fastfood[j+1];
                fastfood[j+1] = temp;
            }
        }
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        printf("Avg cost = %f \n",fastfood[i].avgCost);

    free(fastfood);

    return 0;
}

Output:

Avg cost = 1.890000 
Avg cost = 2.320000 
Avg cost = 3.560000 
share|improve this answer
    
thank you for the response. that is pretty much exactly what I was planning on achieving. I cannot wrap my head around thinking in code so that helps immensely.. I have a slight issue though.. malloc is giving me an error. It gives me -> a value of type "void*" cannot be used to initialize an entity of type "restaurant*" –  mebrunner24 Nov 8 '13 at 2:23
    
@mebrunner24, I think your seeing this error because your system may not be picking up the <cstdlib> which should be visible to C++ but for regular C you should use: #include <stdlib.h>. Look at my code at the top, try that instead. –  Bruce Dean Nov 8 '13 at 2:44
    
I am using the #include <stdlib.h> header. It worked fine on your machine? –  mebrunner24 Nov 8 '13 at 3:25
    
@mebrunner24, yes. If I comment out the std lib.h include I get the same malloc error that you get; malloc is one of the functions of the std lib. Earlier you had <cstdlib> as your include, you might try that, not sure what system you are using or how your compeller is setup. –  Bruce Dean Nov 8 '13 at 3:35

EDIT: Apparently you can use qSort, but you should really read this, before you do anything else. And read up on how to use structs, as well as linked lists

Method 1

I also believe you should set up your structs as a linked list that will sort as elements are added to it. It is not necessary to have individual structs for each food vendor. Rather, you can have have something like this:

struct fastFoodVendor{
  char *chain;
  char *name;
  char *address;
  char *foodType;
  int avgCosts;
  struct fastFoodVendor *next
}

So now, when you add a struct you incorporate it into the linked list, and sort as you are adding items.

Lets say you already have 3 structs in your list with avg price as follows:

5-10-15

So that first struct with avg price of 5 has a pointer called next pointing to the struct with avg price of 10, which in turn has a pointer called next to the struct with average price of 15.

Now you want to add a chain with the average price of 13 to this list, you will want to have some sort of add method that will work as follows:

Keep in mind you have to have a few variables first... one is a fastFoodVendor struct that is called head pointing to the first element in your list(5) (struct fastFoodVendor *head) You will set that when the first element is added and then update it as your list requires.

So, I would then suggest another struct pointer called temp which will go through the list until the correct position is found. For that I would have a while loop.

while(temp->next != null){
  if(temp->next->avgCost > structToAdd->avgCost){
    structToAdd->next = temp->next;
    temp->next = structToAdd;
  }
  else{
    temp = temp->next;
  }
}

What this will do is insert the 13 in the list before the 15.

Let me explain what this while loop does... you must have the conditional set to temp->next != null because if you try and access information from a null pointer you will get a segFault.

Once in the loop you will check to see if the node in front has a greater avgCost than the node you are trying to insert. So temp is pointing at 5, you check to see if the next node's avgCost is greater than 13, but its 10, so you move forward in the list by setting temp = the node with 10. Now that you are at 10 you check to see if the next node (15) is greater than 13... well it is... so you are still at 10 and you want to set this node's next to the struct you want to add, but before you do that you have to set the node you want to add (13)'s next pointer to what temp->next is currently pointing to, otherwise you will lose that node, because nothing will be pointing to it once you set 10's next pointer to the 13 node.

I know that is really long and might be abit complex, so here is a method, that I personally wouldn't use but it should work

Method 2

You have a fixed array of structs, but this will also only work if you use one type of struct (i.e. fastFoodVendor that I listed above) and have a fixed array that you can sort like you would a normal array, but I still don't believe you would be able to use qSort, so you would have to develop your own method for sorting and changing things in the array. The reason I wouldn't pick this method is because there is a lot of overhead, and a lot of wasted time (depending on how much data you are dealing with, for your case I am assuming the difference is negligible). One of the best things about C is how it has the ability to be dynamic, and that is what the linked list is doing.

Take a look at this linked list tutorial: http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial/c/lesson15.html should hopefully help

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for taking the time to answer :) However using qsort to sort an array of structs is indeed possible. Just have your sort function use the struct member that you want to sort on. –  jpw Nov 7 '13 at 22:10
    
@jpw yeah, I saw your comment so I edited mine :P. I forgot that with qSort you input your own sorting function, but by the time I get a sort function down, might as well have made a dynamic linked list. –  Adjit Nov 7 '13 at 22:12
    
Let me try this and I will get back to you.. I remember learning about the temp->next in class the other day. I didn't think to implement that. –  mebrunner24 Nov 7 '13 at 22:44
    
@mebrunner24 keep in mind you have to be careful and always have a pointer pointing to the start of the list. Always be thinking about trying to access information from a null struct because it will cause a segFault. That is the number 1 thing to look out for. Also, it is good to think of temp as your i when using a for loop, but you have to use a while loop in this case as you don't have an index number. So you have to go through your list using temp (temp = temp->next is the equivalent of i = i + 1 / i++) –  Adjit Nov 7 '13 at 22:49
    
@metsales could you help me out with getting that started? We are just getting involved in structures and I'm sort of following you but not to the extent of understanding all of what you're saying. That would be great.. –  mebrunner24 Nov 7 '13 at 22:56

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