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I have searched all over the web for hours, and cannot for the life of me understand why the below code is not working.

The base address that is pulled for the process seems to be wrong. If I hard-code the end-address directly into the ReadMemory, i get the desired value out (so i know i have the correct process and all).

I have not posted the MemoryHandler class, as that is working as it should

Might it have something to do with the fact that I am on a 64-bit windows? The game is 32-bit (installed in the "Program Files (x86)" folder).

public partial class MainForm : Form
{

    Process myProcess = Process.GetProcessesByName("ffxiv").FirstOrDefault();

    public MainForm()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void startButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        IntPtr baseAddress = myProcess.MainModule.BaseAddress;
        Console.WriteLine("Base Address: " + baseAddress.ToString("X"));

        IntPtr newAddr = IntPtr.Add(baseAddress, 0xF8BEFC);
        IntPtr finalAddr = IntPtr.Add(newAddr, 0x1690);

        int bytesRead;
        byte[] memoryOutput = MemoryHandler.ReadMemory(myProcess, finalAddr, 4, out bytesRead);

        int value = BitConverter.ToInt32(memoryOutput, 0);
        Console.WriteLine("Read Value: " + value);
    }
}

EDIT: Base Address was right, my code-logic around pointers were wrong, see full answer below.

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1  
What kind of values are you getting out for the base address and how do you know what the "correct" values are? –  Scott Chamberlain Nov 7 '13 at 21:40
    
Scott, I know what the right address is (and thus that what i get is wrong) from using Cheat Engine on the side. That is how i found the base pointer to HP of this game, for instance. It tells me what address ffxiv.exe should have, and it differs from what my C# code gives me. The strongest proof however, is that the final output from reading memory, does not give my hp (If i hardcode the lowest level address found in cheat engine directly into the read memory function above, i get the correct value). –  Magnus Nov 7 '13 at 21:46
1  
What value is your code returning? What is the correct value? Check for the correct value in Process Explorer. –  David Heffernan Nov 7 '13 at 21:48
    
Not that it matters because the low level addresses are dynamic, but in dec i am supposed to get 9460301 (verified with cheat engine), but instead i get 1220000. These numbers are naturally only applicable to the current instance of the process as mentioned (at restart, these will change). –  Magnus Nov 7 '13 at 21:51
    
Base address of a module is not going to be an odd number! –  David Heffernan Nov 7 '13 at 22:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

So, David's comment that base addresses can't be odd numbers, made me think that perhaps the number i had from Cheat Engine in fact was not the base address. That turned out to be correct. My code was in fact pulling the right base address. The number i posted earlier (9460301) was in fact what was stored at the base address location in memory (not the address itself).

Anyways, the code above takes the base address and adds the first offset, and then adds the next offset, and then reads the memory on that address. That is wrong, that is not how multi-level pointers work. For each level you have to read the memory and see what is stored at the address. The value you find will be your next address, to which you apply your next offset, and so on..

The correct code would be:

public partial class MainForm : Form
{

    Process myProcess = Process.GetProcessesByName("ffxiv").FirstOrDefault();

    public MainForm()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void startButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        int bytesRead;

        IntPtr baseAddress = myProcess.MainModule.BaseAddress;
        Console.WriteLine("Base Address: " + baseAddress);

        IntPtr firstAddress = IntPtr.Add(baseAddress, 0xF8BEFC);
        IntPtr firstAddressValue = (IntPtr)BitConverter.ToInt32(MemoryHandler.ReadMemory(myProcess, firstAddress, 4, out bytesRead), 0);
        IntPtr finalAddr = IntPtr.Add(firstAddressValue, 0x1690);
        Console.WriteLine("Final Address: " + finalAddr.ToString("X"));

        byte[] memoryOutput = MemoryHandler.ReadMemory(myProcess, finalAddr, 4, out bytesRead);

        int value = BitConverter.ToInt32(memoryOutput, 0);
        Console.WriteLine("Read Value: " + value);
    }
}

I am wondering though, how to make this non-specific to 32-bit windows? I don't really like the Int32() function and the subsequent IntPtr casting, so would like to find out if there is any way to go directly from the byte[] to IntPtr. I tried marshal-copy etc., but couldn't get it to work.

Thanks alot again!

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