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I'm with a very challenging problem when dealing with libsvm. When I test my data in libsvm the accuracy is ridiculous (1%). I don't know if its a normal accuracy or if i did something wrong, but when I execute the easy.py script, when the svm-scale script executes the following warning appears several times.

WARNING: feature index i appeared in test.libsvm was not seen in the scaling factor file train.libsvm.range.

How to fix this warning? will the fix improve my accuracy?

EDIT: The contents of train.libsvm.range are the following:

x
-1 1
2 -1 0
3 -1 0
4 1 2
5 -1 0
6 -1 0
7 -1 0
8 0 1
9 0 1
10 -1 0
11 0 1
12 2 3
13 -1 0
14 -1 0
15 -1 0
16 0 2
17 -1 0
18 -2 0
19 -2 0
20 0 1
21 0 2
23 0 1
24 2 3
25 0 1
26 -1 0
27 -1 0
28 1 2
29 -1 0
30 -1 0
31 -1 0
32 0 2
36 0 1

EDIT:Here you can see The training file and the Testing file

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1 Answer 1

This occurs because there are featutres in your test data that were not in the training data used to generate the scaling file. Check that your training and test data sets match. If your test data (or training data) is from the wrong data set, then obtaining the correct data may fix the problem

In your taining data file feature number 3, for example, is always zero so it does not get included in However line 5626 of your test file is the following:

-1 1:0 2:-1 3:-1 4:2 5:-1 6:-1 7:-1 8:0 9:0 10:0 11:0 12:2 13:0 14:-1

Since feature 3 has a value in the test file but is not in scaling factor file you get the error message.

I am not sure where the contents of train.libsvm.range came from that you posted, because if I generate it from the test date I get:

 x
 -1 1
 2 -1 0
 4 0 2   ** note 3 is missing **
 5 -1 0
 6 -1 0
 7 -1 0
 8 0 1
 9 0 1
 12 0 3    ** note 10, 11 are missing **
 etc.

Check that you are using the correct testing and training data.

One other thing, running easy.py I get 65% accuracy not 1%:

    $ ./easy.py train_libsvm.mht test_sdx.mht
    Scaling training data...
    WARNING: original #nonzeros 7560
             new      #nonzeros 15748
    Use -l 0 if many original feature values are zeros
    Cross validation...
    Best c=512.0, g=0.0001220703125 CV rate=70.0
    Training...
    Output model: train_libsvm.mht.model
    Scaling testing data...
    WARNING: feature index 3 appeared in file test_sdx.mht was not seen in the scaling factor file train_libsvm.mht.range.
    WARNING: feature index 10 appeared in file test_sdx.mht was not seen in the scaling factor file train_libsvm.mht.range.
    WARNING: feature index 11 appeared in file test_sdx.mht was not seen in the scaling factor file train_libsvm.mht.range.
    WARNING: feature index 13 appeared in file test_sdx.mht was not seen in the scaling factor file train_libsvm.mht.range.
    WARNING: feature index 22 appeared in file test_sdx.mht was not seen in the scaling factor file train_libsvm.mht.range.
    WARNING: feature index 25 appeared in file test_sdx.mht was not seen in the scaling factor file train_libsvm.mht.range.
    WARNING: original #nonzeros 67740
             new      #nonzeros 169332
    Use -l 0 if many original feature values are zeros
    Testing...
    Accuracy = 65.651% (3706/5645) (classification)
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Thanks for your answer. What do you mean when you say that the training/testing data set must match? I have two feature vectors files and all the feature vectors have the same dimensions. So, why this is happening? –  mad Nov 8 '13 at 9:52
    
My training data have 126 samples with 64 dimensions. My testing data have 1129 samples also with 64 dimensions. Can you see the contents of the train.libsvm in the edited question? thanks again. –  mad Nov 8 '13 at 11:09
1  
@mad most likely one of the features was 0 in all training instances. As such, there is no associated scaling factor. In your test data, there appear to be instances for which said feature is nonzero which is causing these warnings. You can check the svm-scale output file to verify whether a scaling factor is indeed missing. –  Marc Claesen Nov 8 '13 at 11:14
    
@MarcClaesen: you are right, there are 0 values in the missing dimensions of the svm-scale resulting file when i look at them in the training data. But is this messing my accuracy or it is just a warning? –  mad Nov 8 '13 at 11:20
    
Something else is likely to be wrong. An accuracy of 1% makes no sense (e.g. flip the label on your classifier and you'd have 99% accuracy ...). You'd need to provide your code so we can see what's going on. –  Marc Claesen Nov 8 '13 at 11:25

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