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I decided to implement a very simple program recursively, to see how well Java handles recursion*, and came up a bit short. This is what I ended up writing:

public class largestInIntArray {
  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
    // These three lines just set up an array of ints:
    int[] ints = new int[100];
    java.util.Random r = new java.util.Random();
    for(int i = 0; i < 100; i++) ints[i] = r.nextInt();

    System.out.print("Normal:"+normal(ints,-1)+" Recursive:"+recursive(ints,-1));
  }

  private static int normal(int[] input, int largest) {
    for(int i : input)
      if(i > largest) largest = i;

    return largest;
  }

  private static int recursive(int[] ints, int largest) {
    if(ints.length == 1)
      return ints[0] > largest ? ints[0] : largest;

    int[] newints = new int[ints.length - 1];
    System.arraycopy(ints, 1, newints, 0, ints.length - 1); 

    return recursive(newints, ints[0] > largest ? ints[0] : largest);
  }
}

And that works fine, but as it's a bit ugly I wondered if there was a better way. If anyone has any thoughts/alternatives/syntactic sugar to share, that'd be much appreciated!

P.s. If you say "use Lisp" you win nothing (but respect). I want to know if this can be made to look nice in Java.

*and how well I handle recursion

share|improve this question
    
Recursion is not going to be as simple or efficient in Java as iteration except very rare cases. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 31 '09 at 13:06
    
Yeah, but if anyone's going to be well prepared for the space complexity of recursion, it's a Java developer :) –  Robert Grant Dec 31 '09 at 13:35
1  
In any language, you'll always have to either copy the array, or pass indices into that array. If you mean "Lisp using a linked list", then sure, it's nicer than "Java using an array", but I think "X using a linked list" is nicer than "Y using an array" for any X and Y. (Displaced arrays in Common Lisp handle a little of the bookkeeping for you, but I don't think they really make this case much simpler.) –  Ken Jan 1 '10 at 3:49

9 Answers 9

up vote 7 down vote accepted

2 improvements:

  • no copy of the array (just using the offset)
  • no need to give the current max

    private static int recursive(int[] ints, int offset) {
        if (ints.length - 1 == offset) {
            return ints[offset];
        } else {
            return Math.max(ints[offset], recursive(ints, offset + 1));
        }
    }
    

Start the recursion with recursive(ints, 0).

share|improve this answer
    
I actually preferred this one because its use of recursion is more legant than the winning answer, but it doesn't do some things the winner does. Thanks though :) –  Robert Grant Jan 8 '10 at 14:28
    
Such as? The only difference to my eyes is the handling of an empty array which throws an exception here (good, there is no max so no good answer) vs returning an arbitrary (false) value in the winning answer. –  Jerome Jan 8 '10 at 15:15
    
Good point. Changed. –  Robert Grant Apr 25 '12 at 15:51

Here's how I might make the recursive method look nicer:

  private static int recursive(int[] ints, int largest, int start) {
    if (start == ints.length) {
      return largest;
    }
    return recursive(ints, Math.max(ints[start], largest), start + 1);
  }

This avoids the expensive array copy, and works for an empty input array. You may implement an additional overloaded method with only two parameters for the same signature as the iterative function:

  private static int recursive(int[] ints, int largest) {
    return recursive(ints, largest, 0);
  }
share|improve this answer
1  
JOOI, is there any difference between Math.max and a ternary operator with a greater than? –  Robert Grant Dec 31 '09 at 10:27
    
Yes, I find that using max() is easier to read than using the Java conditional operator for the same purpose. If there's a performance difference, you would have to measure it for your specific environment. –  Greg Hewgill Dec 31 '09 at 10:49
1  
With max() you Don't have to Repeat Yourself. –  Ken Jan 1 '10 at 3:44

You could pass the current index as a parameter rather than copying almost the entire array each time or you could use a divide and conquer approach.

share|improve this answer
public static int max(int[] numbers) {
  int size = numbers.length;
  return max(numbers, size-1, numbers[size-1]);
}

public static int max(int[] numbers, int index, int largest) {
  largest = Math.max(largest, numbers[index]);
  return index > 0 ? max(numbers, index-1, largest) : largest;
}
share|improve this answer

... to see how well Java handles recursion

The simple answer is that Java doesn't handle recursion well. Specifically, Sun java compilers and Hotspot JVMs do not implement tail call recursion optimization, so recursion intensive algorithms can easily consume a lot of stack space.

However, I have seen articles that say that IBM's JVMs do support this optimization. And I saw an email from some non-Sun guy who said he was adding it as an experimental Hotspot extension as a thesis project.

share|improve this answer
    
I wonder if anything came of this. –  Robert Grant Nov 26 '14 at 6:57
    
Apparently nothing :) –  Robert Grant Nov 26 '14 at 7:00

Here's a slight variation showing how Linked Lists are often a little nicer for recursion, where "nicer" means "less parameters in method signature"

  private static int recursive(LinkedList<Integer> list) {
    if (list.size() == 1){
      return list.removeFirst();
    }
    return Math.max(list.removeFirst(),recursive(list));
  }
share|improve this answer

Your recursive code uses System.arrayCopy, but your iterative code doesn't do this, so your microbenchmark isn't going to be accurate. As others have mentioned, you can clean up that code by using Math.min and using an array index instead of the queue-like approach you had.

share|improve this answer
public class Maximum 
{

    /**
     * Just adapted the iterative approach of finding maximum and formed a recursive function
     */
    public static int max(int[] arr,int n,int m)
    {
        if(m < arr[n])
        {
            m = arr[n];
            return max(arr,n - 1,m);
        }
        return m;
    }
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
       int[] arr = {1,2,3,4,5,10,203,2,244,245,1000,55000,2223};
       int max1 =  max(arr,arr.length-1,arr[0]);
       System.out.println("Max: "+ max1);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Welcome to Stack Overflow! Would you consider adding some narrative to explain why this code works, and what makes it an answer to the question? This would be very helpful to the person asking the question, and anyone else who comes along. –  Andrew Barber Feb 19 '13 at 21:01

I actually have a pre made class that I setup for finding the largest integer of any set of values. You can put this class into your project and simply use it in any class like so:

 System.out.println(figures.getLargest(8,6,12,9,120));

This would return the value "120" and place it in the output. Here is the methods source code if you are interested in using it:

public class figures {

public static int getLargest(int...f) {
   int[] score = new int[f.length];
    int largest=0;
    for(int x=0;x<f.length;x++) {
        for(int z=0;z<f.length;z++) {
            if(f[x]>=f[z]) {
                score[x]++;
            }else if(f[x]<f[z]) {

            }else {
                continue;
            }
            if(z>=f.length) {
                z=0;
                break;
            }
        }
    }
    for(int fg=0;fg<f.length;fg++) {
        if(score[fg]==f.length) {
            largest = f[fg];
        }
    }
    return largest;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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