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I'm still new to Powershell; and having trouble wrapping my head around a way to convert the string into a powershell-friendly objects (converted to either Powershell Property names and respective values for each property name or, if that's too complex, then, a two-dimensional array grid). Ideally, I wouldn't mind seeing how each way is implemented so I can do either way in the future. Anyway, here's the string below:

$String = 
"   Port      Name               Status       Vlan       Duplex  Speed Type
    Fa1/0/1   Router 2           connected    trunk        full    100 10/100BaseTX
    Fa1/0/2   User               connected    101          full    100 10/100BaseTX
    Fa1/0/3   User               notconnect   101          full    100 10/100BaseTX
    Fa1/0/4   Video VLAN         connected    503          full    100 10/100BaseTX
    Fa1/0/5   User               notconnect   101          full    100 10/100BaseTX
"

Since my Powershell scripting experience is very limited, I was barely able to do a single dimensional array only (using [regex]::split). Unfortunately, the way I use that method caused empty items in the the array; and, it doesnt seem to have a [StringSplitOptions]"RemoveEmptyEntries" capability like the way string.split does.

type int.txt | %{$data = [regex]::split($_, '(\s\s)+')
Write-Output "$($data[0])`t$($data[1])`t$($data[2])`t$($data[3])`t$($data[4])`t$($data[5])`t$($data[6])`t$($data[7])"}

Hence, I end up with some undesired empty items being assigned to the array; with an output like this:

                Port            Name             Status
                Fa1/0/1          Router 2                connected
                Fa1/0/2          User            connected
                Fa1/0/3          User            notconnect
                Fa1/0/4          Video VLAN              connected
                Fa1/0/5          User            notconnect

Anyway, I would really like an expert's solution demonstrating how to convert the string to Powershell Properties and/or a two-dimensional array. Thanks in advance!

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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you're dealing with fixed-width data, and can't necessarily trust that you'll have predictable delimiters to split on then you may want to parse it based purely on column position. You'll see that done frequently with string.substring() methods, but you can use regex. Personally, I prefer the regex. Here's an example:

$string = 
@'
    Port      Name               Status       Vlan       Duplex  Speed Type
    Fa1/0/1   Router 2           connected    trunk        full    100 10/100BaseTX
    Fa1/0/2   User               connected    101          full    100 10/100BaseTX
    Fa1/0/3   User               notconnect   101          full    100 10/100BaseTX
    Fa1/0/4   Video VLAN         connected    503          full    100 10/100BaseTX
    Fa1/0/5   User               notconnect   101          full    100 10/100BaseTX
'@



$regex = '(.{10})(.{19})(.{13})(.{11})(.{8})(.{6})(.+)'

$string.split("`n") -notmatch '\s*Port\s+' |
 foreach {
  if ($_.trim() -match $regex)
   { [PSCustomObject]@{
     Port   = $Matches[1].trim()
     Name   = $Matches[2].trim()
     Status = $Matches[3].trim()
     Vlan   = $Matches[4].trim()
     Duplex = $Matches[5].trim()
     Speed  = $Matches[6].trim()
     Type   = $Matches[7].trim()
    }
   }
  } | ft -AutoSize



Port    Name       Status     Vlan  Duplex Speed Type        
----    ----       ------     ----  ------ ----- ----        
Fa1/0/1 Router 2   connected  trunk full   100   10/100BaseTX
Fa1/0/2 User       connected  101   full   100   10/100BaseTX
Fa1/0/3 User       notconnect 101   full   100   10/100BaseTX
Fa1/0/4 Video VLAN connected  503   full   100   10/100BaseTX
Fa1/0/5 User       notconnect 101   full   100   10/100BaseTX
share|improve this answer
    
Nice :) This was going to be my next attempt, but I was going to detect indexes using IndexOf("Name") etc. –  Frode F. Nov 8 '13 at 7:20
    
This is VERY nice! Works great! Best of all, I understand all the code, even the regex. I think I should be able to make similar scripts now without having to refer to to this code snippet. Thanks!! –  MKANET Nov 8 '13 at 18:21
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Try this.

$String = @"
    Port      Name               Status       Vlan       Duplex  Speed Type
    Fa1/0/1   Router 2           connected    trunk        full    100 10/100BaseTX
    Fa1/0/2   User               connected    101          full    100 10/100BaseTX
    Fa1/0/3   User               notconnect   101          full    100 10/100BaseTX
    Fa1/0/4   Video VLAN         connected    503          full    100 10/100BaseTX
    Fa1/0/5   User               notconnect   101          full    100 10/100BaseTX
"@

$temp = $string -split "`n" | 
            Foreach {$_ -replace '(\S+) (\S+)\s*$', '$1  $2' -replace '^\s+',''}

$temp | Foreach {$_ -replace '(?<=\S) (?=\S)',[char]0xA0 -replace ' +',' ' } | 
        ConvertFrom-Csv -Delimiter ' ' | Format-Table -auto

This works by prepping the input string to put two spaces between the next to the last and the last columns and then it replaces the remaining single spaces with a non-breaking space.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it looks like you discovered some of the problems I faced; but I didn't mention. "Name" field definitely have spaces and they're all white space delimited; which is the reason why I used the regex split method to detect for at least two spaces. So, unfortunately, what you mentioned wont work for the example I provided. –  MKANET Nov 7 '13 at 22:35
    
I've updated this answer to not require manual changes to the input string. In my tests, it actually outputs the correct data based on the input string you've specified. –  Keith Hill Nov 7 '13 at 23:19
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Here's another version, FWIW:

$regex = '(.{10})(.{19})(.{13})(.{11})(.{8})(.{6})(.+)'
$props = ',Port,Name,Status,Vlan,Duplex,Speed,Type'.split(',') 
$ht = [ordered]@{}

$string.split("`n") -notmatch '\s*Port\s+' |
 foreach {
  if ($_.trim() -match $regex) {
   for ($i=1;$i -lt $props.count;$i++)
   { $ht[$props[$i]]=$matches[$i]}
   [PSCustomObject]$ht
  }
}
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Let's convert it to a csv file and then import it. This will give you an array with objects representing each interface with all their properties.

PS > $a = Get-Content .\int.txt | Foreach {$_.Trim() -replace ' {2,}',','}  | ConvertFrom-Csv

PS > $a | ft -AutoSize

Port    Name       Status     Vlan  Duplex Speed Type      
----    ----       ------     ----  ------ ----------      
Fa1/0/1 Router 2   connected  trunk full   100 10/100BaseTX
Fa1/0/2 User       connected  101   full   100 10/100BaseTX
Fa1/0/3 User       notconnect 101   full   100 10/100BaseTX
Fa1/0/4 Video VLAN connected  503   full   100 10/100BaseTX
Fa1/0/5 User       notconnect 101   full   100 10/100BaseTX

This will also work with space in the interface names, as long as it's only a SINGLE space between the words.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, so how would I, for example, look for all lines that have a status of "Connected"; and, get the respective "Port" name? Edit: Nevermind... got it: $a | ?{$_.status -eq "connected"} | select port –  MKANET Nov 7 '13 at 22:45
    
That doesn't produce the correct output for a string with that data in it i.e. it is a single string - as the OP originally posed the question. For example $string | Foreach {$_.Trim() -replace ... produces output that doesn't match the original input string. –  Keith Hill Nov 7 '13 at 22:57
    
It's also not splittiting the Speed and Type into separate properties. –  mjolinor Nov 7 '13 at 23:31
    
My bad. Didn't notice the Speed and Type were onl separated by a single space. @KeithHill, I noticed that he used type int.txt later, so I'm guessing that the data is already stored to a file. That the here-string(that we you could just split up) was just for tests here. :-) –  Frode F. Nov 8 '13 at 6:41
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