Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have created a dictionary by using this:

a = dict.fromkeys([round(x*0.1,1) for x in range(10)], [0,0])

it will give me the following results:

>>> a
{0.0: [0, 0], 0.5: [0, 0], 0.2: [0, 0], 0.4: [0, 0], 0.8: [0, 0], 0.6: [0, 0], 0.3: [0, 0], 0.1: [0, 0], 0.9: [0, 0], 0.7: [0, 0]}

I only want to update the second value for key=0.5, for example. I was using the following code:

a[0.5][1]=a[0.5][1]+10

However, it turns out that it updated all second values for all keys.

>>> a
{0.0: [0, 10], 0.5: [0, 10], 0.2: [0, 10], 0.4: [0, 10], 0.8: [0, 10], 0.6: [0, 10], 0.3: [0, 10], 0.1: [0, 10], 0.9: [0, 10], 0.7: [0, 10]}

I'm wondering if there is a way to do that?

Many thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
Please show the full code, there's something else going on there. –  Lev Levitsky Nov 7 '13 at 22:00
1  
did you initialize it as [0, 0] * 10 ? –  karthikr Nov 7 '13 at 22:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Don't use dict.fromkeys with a mutable value, it simply copies the reference to the same list object to all the keys. So, changing any one the reference is going to affect all the lists.

>>> d = dict.fromkeys('abcdef', [])
>>> [id(x) for x in d.values()]
[164654156, 164654156, 164654156, 164654156, 164654156, 164654156]

Use a dict comprehension instead:

>>> d = {k:[] for k in  'abcdef'}
>>> [id(x) for x in d.values()]
[164621484, 164653580, 164331340, 164653804, 164653900, 164653836]

For your code it is going to be:

a = {round(x*0.1,1): [0, 0] for _ in range(10)}
share|improve this answer
    
I might seem like being picky, but it simply copies the same list object to all the keys - shouldn't this read it simply copies the reference to the same list object to all the keys? –  kroolik Nov 7 '13 at 22:23
    
@kroolik Your version looks good, I've updated my answer. Thanks. :-) –  Ashwini Chaudhary Nov 7 '13 at 22:29
    
Very nice explanation! That helps a lot! –  user2966752 Nov 7 '13 at 23:16

That because you used the same list for every value in your dict.

Don't use fromkeys with a mutable value. Use a dict comprehension:

a = {round(x*0.1, 1): [0, 0] for x in range(10)}

Or, if you're stuck with 2.6, a fake dict comprehension:

a = dict((round(x*0.1, 1), [0, 0]) for x in range(10))
share|improve this answer

All of the dictionary entries reference the same list. You would be better off creating the dictionary differently:

a = {}
for x in range(10):
    a[round(x*0.1,1)] = [0,0] 
share|improve this answer

You're using the same list instance as value for all keys. Instead of:

a=dict.fromkeys([round(x*0.1,1) for x in range(10)], [0,0])

Initialize it like this:

a=dict((round(x*0.1,1), [0, 0]) for x in range(10))
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.