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In school we are learning how to use binary files in c++ in Visual Studio. This piece of code works perfectly in Visual Studio 2005 but in version 2010 - 2013 it doesn't. It gives a reading violation error. So i hope one of you can help me with this because even my teacher doesn't know whats wrong :( The error happens at the end of the read. I've tried different method of ifstream and ofstream but with no succes.

My code:

#include <z:/Yoshi On My Mac/Google Drive/School/2013-2014/C-taal/headeryoshi.h>
#define B "z:/Yoshi On My Mac/Google Drive/city.dat"
typedef struct city {
        string zip, name;
};
void add() {
    ofstream file;
    city city;
    titelscherm("ADD CITY");
    cout << "ZIP: ";
    getline(cin, city.zip);
    while (city.zip not_eq "0") {
            cout << "Name: ";
            getline(cin, city.name);

            file.open(B, ios::app | ios::binary);
            file.write((char*)&city, sizeof(city));
            file.close();

            titelscherm("ADD CITY");
            cout << "POSTCODE: ";
            getline(cin, city.zip);
    }
    cout << "city: ";
    file.close();
}
void read() {
    ifstream file;
    city city;
    titelscherm("READ CITY");
    file.open(B, ios::in | ios::binary);
    file.read((char*)&city, sizeof(city));
    while (!file.eof()) {
            cout << city.zip << " ";
            cout << city.name << endl;
            file.read((char*)&city, sizeof(city));
    }
    file.close();
    _getch();      
}
void search() {
    string zip;
    city city;
    ifstream file;
    bool find;

    titelscherm("SEARCH ZIP");
    cout << "ZIP: ";
    getline(cin, zip);

    file.open(B, ios::in | ios::binary);
    if (!file.is_open()){
            cout << "FILE ERROR";
    }
    else {
            do {
                    file.read((char*)&city, sizeof(city));
                    find = (city.zip == zip);
            } while (!file.eof() and !find);

            if (find) {
                    cout << city.name << endl;
            }
            else {
                    cout<<" zit niet in het file" << endl;
            }
    }
    _getch();
    file.close();
}
int main() {
    add();
    read();
    search();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
StackOverflow is a place for posting code, not links to code. –  nhgrif Nov 8 '13 at 0:04
    
Is it better now? –  Yoshi Peters Nov 8 '13 at 0:07
    
Show us the errors you're getting. –  template boy Nov 8 '13 at 0:07
    
This is the error:First-chance exception at 0x608CDF58 (msvcp120d.dll) in c++Project.exe: 0xC0000005: Access violation reading location 0x01228D14. –  Yoshi Peters Nov 8 '13 at 0:10

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I would have serious doubts about your teacher's C++ abilities.

You cannot read std::string as raw data. It is not a POD type.

file.read((char*)&city, sizeof(city))
...
file.write((char*)&city, sizeof(city));

This code should NOT have worked previously, but it sounds like you somehow got real lucky.

You will need to serialize the strings out by writing their length, followed by the actual characters. When you read, you will read the size first, then allocate storage, then read the characters.

If you want to use your approach instead, then change the string values in your structure to char arrays.

share|improve this answer
    
I've no clue what your talking about the be honest –  Yoshi Peters Nov 8 '13 at 0:11
    
thanks I'll try that! –  Yoshi Peters Nov 8 '13 at 0:12
    
I hesitate to say this, but perhaps you need to ask your teacher to explain it to you. Basically, you're writing the raw internals of the string class, which most likely is a pointer. When you read that pointer in, it doesn't point at any memory you actually own. It's just a number. "POD" means "plain old data". –  paddy Nov 8 '13 at 0:13
2  
If I were you, I would find another teacher. The code you supplied is an absolutely fundamental no-no. Nobody who is even halfway competent in C++ would make this mistake. I'm sorry to stress that point, but I'm very surprised. Here is a link to an old answer I wrote dealing with serializing some standard containers: stackoverflow.com/a/12416447/1553090. Scroll down to find some code that serializes strings. –  paddy Nov 8 '13 at 0:17
1  
Agree with paddy. That kind of mistake is unacceptable from a teacher. I'd even have a chat with my boss if a colleague did this. –  MSalters Nov 8 '13 at 0:18

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