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I am sure this will be marked as a duplicate, but I truly don't understand what I'm looking at. I've checked The python documentation on Descriptors, but I have been "programming" in Python for two weeks now and I don't really know what I'm looking for!

This is what I got:

>>> class Blub(object):
...     def __init__(self, value):
...             print('Blub is ' + value)
...             self.value = value
...     def __get__(self):
...             print('Blub gets ' + self.value)
...             return self.value
...     def __set__(self, value):
...             print('Blub becomes ' + value)
...             self.value = value
...
>>> class Quish(object):
...     def __init__(self, value):
...             self.blub = Blub(value)
...     def __get__(self):
...             return self.blub
...     def __set__(self, value):
...             self.blub = Blub(value)
... 

The following is what I want to happen and don't know how to do:

>>> a = Quish('One')
Blub is One
>>> a.blub
Blub gets One
'One'
a.blub = 'Two'
Blub becomes Two

What do I do in Blub or Quish in order for this to happen. I have really simple classes here, but I have a much more intricate version which works perfectly but only if I type:

>>> a.blub.__get__()

I thought that the point of these descriptors was to make it unnecessary to actually write get() and set(). How do I make it behave like I would like, or can Python not do that?

share|improve this question
1  
Is there a reason you want to write your own descriptor class for this instead of using a property? –  BrenBarn Nov 8 '13 at 3:02
    
@BrenBarn: I was unaware of properties. I'm still trying to decide which is better (easier) to use in this situation. I have to ask another question regarding my actual noob-class-monster that I've been working on in order to figure this out. Thank you for pointing this out. More reading I have to do now! –  Sean Nov 8 '13 at 3:50
    
Properties are almost surely easier than writing your own descriptor. –  BrenBarn Nov 8 '13 at 3:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Normally you'd not use descriptors directly, but use property, which is an implementation of a descriptor in an easy-to-use way. Here's how you'd use it:

class Quish(object):
    def __init__(self, value):
        self.blub = value

    @property
    def blub(self):
        print('Blub gets ' + self._blub)
        return self._blub

    @blub.setter
    def blub(self, value):
        print('Blub becomes ' + value)
        self._blub = value

If you really want to write your own descriptor, your problem is that it needs to be set directly on the type, not as another instance attribute, and you'll need to deal with having one descriptor multiple instances:

class Blub(object):
    def __get__(self, instance, owner):
        print('Blub gets ' + instance._blub)
        return instance._blub

    def __set__(self, instance, value):
        print('Blub becomes ' + value)
        instance._blub = value


class Quish(object):
    blub = Blub()

    def __init__(self, value):
        self.blub = value
share|improve this answer
1  
The important point is that you do not create a separate descriptor for each instance. There is one descriptor, stored on the class, and it manages access to a per-instance attribute (_blub) on each instance. –  BrenBarn Nov 8 '13 at 3:05
    
So I have a somewhat complicated sort of parser that I'm trying to do this with. It gets a file, which gets lines containing fields, one of which is a type and another a path, from which I get a file extension. I currently have it working, but I need to access the extension of a file by typing "if f.line[0].extension.__get__() == 'rtf' and f.line[0].type.__get__() == 15..." there's no way to just say "if f.line[0].extension == 'rtf' and f.line[0].type == 15..."? because then I need to change the extension and type, which will get sloppy looking in a hurry. –  Sean Nov 8 '13 at 3:23
1  
@Sean: Python does let you override that sort of thing using descriptors without needing to explicitly call __get__; the only reason it's not working for you is you're putting the descriptor on instances of Quish, when they need to be on the type of Quish. See how in the second code block I have blub = Blub() outside __init__? That's essential; otherwise, Python won't recognize it as a descriptor. –  icktoofay Nov 8 '13 at 3:27
    
@icktoofay: Alright, I'm starting to understand, but now I have a new question, which I will have to start a new thread for, I suppose. Thank you very much, however. –  Sean Nov 8 '13 at 3:46

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