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I have a class that takes the in an array and its size. in the class I have an index operator "[]" that has been overloaded to pass in its contents to a class member function and return that function. It also checks if I am accessing contents out side of the array size.

     this_type operator[] (int index)  
    {
        assert (index > 0 && index<=len);
        at(index);
        return c_arr()[index];
    }

I made a copy constructor for it

   //constructor
    my_array(this_type const arr[], int size)
    {
    len = size;
    assert(arr != NULL);
    assert(size >= 0);

    this->arr = new this_type[size];
    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
        (*this).arr[i] = arr[i];
    }
    //copy constructor
    my_array( const my_array<this_type>  & arr)
    {
    this->arr = new this_type[sizeof(arr)];
    memcpy(this->arr, arr.arr, sizeof(this_type)*arr.len);
    }
    my_array(int size)
    {
    len = size;
    assert(size >= 0);

    this->arr = new this_type[size];
    }

But it does not seem to pass in the array size value when called to the member function "len". Any thoughts?

    #include <iostream>
    #include <cassert>
    #include <assert.h>
    using namespace std;

    template <class this_type> 
    class my_array
    {
    private:
    this_type *arr;
    int len;

    int sum()
    {
        int sum;
        for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
            sum += arr[i];
    }

    public:


    int size() const
    {
    return len;
    }

    this_type &at(int index)
    {
    assert( index >= 0 && index < len);
    return arr[index];
    }

    my_array(this_type const arr[], int size)
    {
    len = size;
    assert(arr != NULL);
    assert(size >= 0);

    this->arr = new this_type[size];
    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
        (*this).arr[i] = arr[i];
    }
    my_array( const my_array<this_type>  & arr)
    {
    this->arr = new this_type[sizeof(arr)];
    memcpy(this->arr, arr.arr, sizeof(this_type)*arr.len);
    }
    my_array(int size)
    {
    len = size;
    assert(size >= 0);

    this->arr = new this_type[size];
    }
    ~my_array()
    {
    delete[] arr;
    }

    this_type* c_arr()
    {
        return arr;
    }

     this_type & operator[] (int index)
        {
        assert (index > 0 && index<=len);
         at(index);
         return c_arr()[index];
    }

     this_type operator[] (int index)  
    {
        assert (index > 0 && index<=len);
        at(index);
        return c_arr()[index];
    }
    friend istream & operator>>(istream &lhs, my_array<this_type> &rhs);

    friend ostream & operator<<(ostream &lhs, my_array<this_type> &rhs);
    };
    template <class this_type> 
    ostream & operator<<(ostream &lhs, my_array<this_type>&rhs)
    {
    for ( int i = 0; i < rhs.size(); i++)
        lhs << rhs.arr[i] << endl;
    return lhs;
    }
    template <class this_type> 
    istream & operator>>(istream &lhs, my_array<this_type> &rhs)
    {
    for ( int i = 0; i < rhs.size(); i++)
        lhs >> rhs.arr[i];
    return lhs;
    }




    int main()
    {
    char arra[5]={'c','o','d','e','s'};

    my_array<char> arr(arra,5), arr1(5), arr2(arr);
       for(int t=0;t< 9;t++)
      {
       //use the operator that is attached to the class instance
        cout << arr2[t];

   }
    for(int t=0;t< 9;t++)
    {
    cout<<arr2.c_arr()[t];
    }
    return 0;
    }
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
this->arr = new this_type[sizeof(arr)];

This line from your copy constructor is not correct. arr is an object of your my_array class. sizeof(arr) is a compile time constant, and completely independent of the number of elements allocated for the array. Those elements are not even contained in the class. They are on the free store, and the class holds a pointer to them. What you want instead is this:

this->arr = new this_type[arr.len];

You also want to assign to the len member of the object you are constructing.

this->len = arr.len;

I am obliged to say that, unless you are creating this class for learning purposes, just use std::vector.

share|improve this answer
    
okay but , this->len = arr.len; still isn't putting the assigning the arr.len value to this->len. –  user2317666 Nov 8 '13 at 3:55
    
@user2317666: Do you have a compileable code example that demonstrates this problem? The one currently in your question does not. If it does, what output are you getting, and what output are you expecting? –  Benjamin Lindley Nov 8 '13 at 4:06

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