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Alright, so I'm trying to make an expression-as-a-string solver, so that the user can input a string, such as 2+4*5/10, and it will print out the answer, 4. I have some code written, but it doesn't apply the order of operations; it simply solves the equation in order of the operators - e.g. 2+4*5/10 would produce 3, which is incorrect. How do I make it so that multiplication and division are performed first, then addition and subtraction? Here's the code I have right now:

class Expressions
{
String E;
void SetE(String e)
{
    E = e;
}

int EvalE()
{
    int res = 0;
    int temp = 0;
    char op = '+';

    for(int i=0;i<E.length();i++)
    {
        if(E.charAt(i)=='*'||E.charAt(i)=='/'||E.charAt(i)=='+'||E.charAt(i)=='-')
        {
            if(op=='*')res*=temp;
            else if(op=='/')res/=temp;
            else if(op=='+')res+=temp;
            else res-=temp;

            temp=0;
            op=E.charAt(i);
        }
        else
        {
            temp = temp*10+E.charAt(i)-'0';
        }
    }

    if(op=='*')res*=temp;
    else if(op=='/')res/=temp;
    else if(op=='+')res+=temp;
    else res-=temp;

    return res;
}
}
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Parse it into an expression tree. –  Kevin Nov 8 '13 at 3:25
    
    
Beware the dreaded integer divisions. –  David Wallace Nov 11 '13 at 1:38

3 Answers 3

Use two for loops.

In your first loop, search for * and / operators. Evaluate that part and replace that part of the string with the result of the evaluation.

In your second loop, do all the + and - as you're already doing.

So for the example you use, 2+4*5/10, your first loop would look for * or /. Upon finding the *, it evaluates 4*5. That's 20, so the string is modified into 2+20/10. Check again, and it finds the /, and modifies the string into 2+2.

Now you go through your second loop, and get 4.

share|improve this answer
    
That's what I thought I had to do, but I'm not really sure how to replace 4*5 with 20. –  user2967415 Nov 8 '13 at 3:32
    
Start by finding the index of the substring 4*5, perform the multiplication on that substring, turn the result into a string, then use the replace method. –  nhgrif Nov 8 '13 at 3:38
    
Ok, I suppose my real problem is that I don't know how to make 4*5 a substring. I know it needs to be like E.substring(E.indexOf('4'),E.indexOf('5')+1) in this case, but I have no idea how to specify which which character should be the beginning index and which should be the ending index, when E can be any string. Thanks for the help so far though! –  user2967415 Nov 8 '13 at 3:50
    
E.subString( (E.indexOf("*") - 1), (E.indexOf("*") + 1) )? I'm not perfectly familiar with Java's String methods. –  nhgrif Nov 8 '13 at 3:51
    
That would work, but the numbers can be any size. So if 4 were actually 278, then that wouldn't work. –  user2967415 Nov 8 '13 at 3:53

You need to do two steps instead of one. In first step you parse equation into the reverse polish notation, then in second step you run through that and calculate results. Nice bonus is you get brackets support for (almost) free :-)

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Actually @nhgnf answer is much simpler if you don't need to go beyond four basic operations –  PiotrK Nov 8 '13 at 3:29
    
Haha, yea... but I like your answer better actually. –  nhgrif Nov 8 '13 at 3:34

Split the expression into two simpler expressions, then use recursion.

You have to do the following steps in precisely this order, or you will mess up the order of operations.

  1. Look for the rightmost + sign. If there is such a +, then use recursion to evaluate the sub-expression to the left of it, then the sub-expression to the right of it, then add them and return the result.
  2. If there's no + sign, then look for the rightmost - sign that's preceded by a number (that is, it's subtraction, not negation). If there is such a -, then use recursion to evaluate the sub-expression to the left of it, then the sub-expression to the right of it, then subtract them and return the result.
  3. If there's no + or - sign, then look for the rightmost * sign. If there is such a *, then use recursion to evaluate the sub-expression to the left of it, then the sub-expression to the right of it, then multiply them and return the result.
  4. If there's no +, - or * sign, then look for the rightmost * sign. If there is such a *, then use recursion to evaluate the sub-expression to the left of it, then the sub-expression to the right of it, then divide them and return the result. If you're using integers, you'll have to think about whether you want integer division or floating point. You might also want to do some kind of check around dividing by zero.
  5. If there's no +, -, * or /, then all you've got is numbers and whitespace. Maybe a negative sign. Strip out the whitespace, parse it and return it.

Example: "6 - 5 - 4 + 3 * -2"

  • First, split at the +, and use recursion to evaluate "6 - 5 - 4 " and " 3 * -2".
  • For "6 - 5 - 4 ", split at the second - , and use recursion to evaluate "6 - 5 " and " 4 ".
  • For "6 - 5 ", split at the -, and use recursion to evaluate "6 " and " 5 ".
  • For " 3 * -2", split at the *, because the - is not preceded by a number. Use recursion to evaluate " 3 " and " -2 ".
  • For each of "6 ", " 5 ", " 4 ", " 3 " and " -2 ", there are no operators, so we just strip out the white space and parse.
  • The result of our calculation will be "((6-5)-4)+(3*-2)", so the order of operations worked out correctly.
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